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NEWS
July 12, 1992
Is the General Assembly fiddling while Baltimore burns? That disturbing possibility has crossed the minds of some city officials after hearing bad news from the Baltimore Area Convention and Visitors Association: The city's convention business could be off $60 million next year, and without help from Annapolis on building a much bigger meeting hall, Baltimore could see even worse revenue drops in the future.The simple fact is that Baltimore has been overtaken as a convention venue by such cities as Philadelphia; Charlotte, N.C.; Orlando, Fla., and Atlanta, which are expanding or have recently enlarged their meeting sites to accommodate bigger conferences.
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BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | March 24, 2014
The city-owned Hilton Baltimore spent nearly all of the $2.8 million it generated in hotel occupancy taxes — money the city gave it last year to help the struggling convention center hotel make its debt payments, officials said. The hotel did return $72,000 of the tax money to city coffers. Baltimore City Finance Director Harry E. Black called it a turning point for the hotel, which at one point last year looked as if it might need even more help. The West Pratt Street hotel has lost more than $50 million since opening in 2008 as it struggled to make payments on the $301 million in tax-exempt municipal bonds issued to finance its construction.
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NEWS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,Sun reporter | August 2, 2008
When the $301 million, city-owned Hilton Baltimore Convention Center Hotel opens this month, city officials believe it still can bring sorely needed convention business to the city despite a weak economy that has dampened demand for lodging. Hotel and city officials, who offered yesterday the first peek inside the 757-room hotel, say early booking results by convention groups and other travelers are promising. And the hotel will achieve its goal of opening on time and on budget, they said.
NEWS
November 4, 2013
A downtown convention center with a publicly-funded Hilton hotel is not a circumstance unique to Baltimore. Cleveland will have its own large-scale Hilton opening for business in 2016, it was announced last month. Why? Because without a convention center hotel, city leaders recognized Cleveland couldn't succeed in the highly competitive meetings industry. Sound familiar? Baltimore went through a similar decision-making process nearly a decade ago and came to an identical conclusion.
NEWS
By June Arney and June Arney,SUN STAFF | September 18, 2003
Baltimore's convention business dipped in the most recent fiscal year to its lowest level since the size of the city's convention center was tripled in 1997, according to statistics released this week. Convention-related hotel bookings also slumped to two-thirds the budgeted level in the fiscal year ended June 30, the Baltimore Area Convention and Visitors Association reported. Months of turmoil at the city's convention and visitors bureau - while its operation underwent a review that led to its president's ouster - along with a national convention travel slump contributed to the miserable showing, industry officials said.
NEWS
By June Arney and June Arney,SUN STAFF | May 31, 2003
As the search for a new leader for Baltimore's beleaguered convention bureau stretches into its fifth month, the city is at a competitive disadvantage and rapidly losing critical ground to competing cities, experts say. "Every month that passes hurts the destination and hurts the hotel industry," said Speros A. Batistatos, owner of Destination Development Group, a Chicago-based convention and hospitality consulting company. "Baltimore starts to suffer from a lack of visibility in the marketplace."
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | March 5, 2012
A $900 million proposal to build a downtown sports and entertainment arena linked to an expanded Baltimore Convention Center would appeal to national and international convention planners seeking a "destination package" and could transform the city, according to a Maryland Stadium Authority study released Monday. Gov. Martin O'Malley and Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake requested the study, which analyzed a proposal to build an 18,500-seat arena and a 500-room Sheraton Hotel, both privately financed, next to a publicly funded convention center expansion at Charles, Pratt, Sharp and Conway streets.
NEWS
November 4, 2013
A downtown convention center with a publicly-funded Hilton hotel is not a circumstance unique to Baltimore. Cleveland will have its own large-scale Hilton opening for business in 2016, it was announced last month. Why? Because without a convention center hotel, city leaders recognized Cleveland couldn't succeed in the highly competitive meetings industry. Sound familiar? Baltimore went through a similar decision-making process nearly a decade ago and came to an identical conclusion.
NEWS
May 24, 2006
The Baltimore Area Convention and Visitors Association rolls out its new campaign today to sell the city as a secret worth getting in on. There's plenty to share about Baltimore: its hospitality, cultural attractions, conviviality, entertainment venues and accessibility. But the pitch can't target only tourists; it must entice convention and meeting planners if the city's convention business is to thrive. The BACVA professionals know this. That's why, within 24 hours of unveiling their new slogan and branding campaign, they will be promoting the city under the "Baltimore - Get In On It" banner at the Greater Washington Society of Association Executives, a big industry trade show with the potential to score convention business.
BUSINESS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | October 26, 2012
Yellow Cab, which has operated in the Baltimore area since 1909, has been named taxi operator of the year by the industry's trade group, the Taxicab, Limousine & Paratransit Association. Behind the wheel is Mark Joseph, a graduate of American University in Washington, who began his career at Yellow Cab in 1976 and was president and CEO for 20 years. When Connex North America acquired Yellow Transportation in 2001, Joseph rose through the executive ranks to become president and chief operating officer of Connex, now Veolia Transportation, and vice chairman and CEO of Veolia.
BUSINESS
By Chris Korman, The Baltimore Sun | August 16, 2013
Even after losing Otakon, the city's biggest convention, Visit Baltimore promoted its success booking future conventions last week. Baltimore's tourism business ticked up somewhat in fiscal year 2013, which ended June 30. Visit Baltimore, the city's convention and visitors bureau, said it sold 477,764 convention room nights for future dates, the third-most of all time. Still, the loss of the giant anime convention demonstrates the need for the city to expand and refresh its convention center in the next decade as business travel rebounds, city officials said.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | June 19, 2013
The mayor of Baltimore does not want to be on the wrong side of history this time, so she fully supports $107 million in tax increment financing to aid the development of Harbor Point, that big slab of old, chromium-saturated land adjacent to Harbor East — you know, Doughville, the upscale city-within-the-city developed by bread magnate John Paterakis. Apparently, Stephanie Rawlings-Blake regrets the vote she cast 15 years ago against giving a substantial tax break to Paterakis, the wealthy and politically influential owner of H&S Bakery and developer of Harbor East.
BUSINESS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | October 26, 2012
Yellow Cab, which has operated in the Baltimore area since 1909, has been named taxi operator of the year by the industry's trade group, the Taxicab, Limousine & Paratransit Association. Behind the wheel is Mark Joseph, a graduate of American University in Washington, who began his career at Yellow Cab in 1976 and was president and CEO for 20 years. When Connex North America acquired Yellow Transportation in 2001, Joseph rose through the executive ranks to become president and chief operating officer of Connex, now Veolia Transportation, and vice chairman and CEO of Veolia.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | August 23, 2012
City convention officials booked the third-highest number of convention room nights ever over the past fiscal year, Visit Baltimore, the city's tourism and convention bureau, announced Thursday. The room nights are reserved for future years. Visit Baltimore booked 475,554 convention room nights in city hotels as far out as 2032 during the fiscal year that ended June 30. Two-thirds of those bookings will be for events held in 2016 or later. Though the number of bookings edged up just 4 percent over the previous year's figure — by 18,000 bookings — it represented the third-highest number of future reservations in a single year, behind 522,000 room nights reserved in fiscal 2009 and 495,000 in fiscal 2010.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | March 5, 2012
A $900 million proposal to build a downtown sports and entertainment arena linked to an expanded Baltimore Convention Center would appeal to national and international convention planners seeking a "destination package" and could transform the city, according to a Maryland Stadium Authority study released Monday. Gov. Martin O'Malley and Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake requested the study, which analyzed a proposal to build an 18,500-seat arena and a 500-room Sheraton Hotel, both privately financed, next to a publicly funded convention center expansion at Charles, Pratt, Sharp and Conway streets.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | November 14, 2011
As the Four Seasons Baltimore opened to its first guests Monday, the city's newest waterfront hotel looked forward to many more. Over a dozen couples have booked weddings, companies have set up corporate accounts, and business is strong for year-end holiday events, said Julien Carralero, the hotel's general manager. Even the $6,000-a-night Royal Suite has potential takers, he said. The hotel even has its sights set on a specialized niche: entertainers and other celebrities seeking privacy and pampering.
NEWS
June 19, 1995
Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke's power play to seize control of the board that oversees the city's tourism and convention promotional efforts sends precisely the wrong signal. It marks a giant step backward in Baltimore's attempts to compete against other cities for convention business.The loss of Crown Central Petroleum owner Henry A. Rosenberg Jr. as chairman of the Baltimore Area Convention and Visitors Association is one this city can ill afford. He has been one of the city's biggest and most consistent boosters.
BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho, The Baltimore Sun | July 22, 2011
Hotel rooms booked for future years by convention or business groups declined nearly 8 percent in the past fiscal year, Baltimore's convention and tourism agency said Thursday. Visit Baltimore said 457,051 rooms were booked for business conferences between next year and 2020, down from the 495,896 hotel room nights booked in fiscal 2010 for future years. "It's still a fantastic year," said Tom Noonan, president and chief executive of Visit Baltimore, who announced the figure at the organization's annual business meeting.
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts, The Baltimore Sun | June 20, 2011
The city-owned Hilton Baltimore Convention Center Hotel performed better in its second full year of operation than in its first, but officials warned that the slow economic recovery means several more years could pass before it turns a profit. In terms of cash flow, the 757-room hotel on Pratt Street ended 2010 "slightly above break-even," with $9.7 million on hand at the end of the year, compared with $8.4 million at the beginning, according to a financial statement provided this month to the city's Board of Estimates.
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