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By Pat Dailey and Pat Dailey,Chicago Tribune | October 9, 1991
THE FOOD TRENDS for 1991 have been charted: safer fish, '60s-style hippie foods, two-dishwasher kitchens. But food trends are for trendwatchers and a small group of people clustered at the top of the foodie pyramid. It's another story for the rest of the world."In my next kitchen, I'd love to have a vending machine and a microwave oven -- forget about the stove," says Joan Coleman, half seriously.Coleman, who lives in Dixon, Ill., is the mother of two boys, ages 6 and 9. Like an ever-increasing number of women, she has a full-time job outside the home.
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By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | February 22, 2014
Two Korean citizens have been sentenced to prison for their roles in a food stamp fraud scheme and may face deportation, the U.S. Attorney in Baltimore announced this week. The cases were part of a food stamp fraud sting that implicated 10 convenience store owners in the Baltimore area in September. Authorities said the defendants, eight of whom have pleaded guilty to food stamp fraud or wire fraud so far, would illegally redeem food stamps in exchange for cash. Hyung Cho, 40, of Catonsville, was sentenced to 38 months in prison and three years of supervised release, and his mother Dae Cho, 67, of Catonsville, was sentenced to 18 months in prison.
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FEATURES
By New York Times News Service > | October 6, 1991
If the '80s were the "light" decade, then the '90s are the "healthy" decade. Supermarkets exploded in the 1980s with light foods promising fewer calories. But now low-calorie isn't enough. Today, food has to be healthful as well.Frozen dinners and entrees bearing names like Healthy Choice, Eating Right, Le Menu Healthy, Healthy Slices and for kids, Snoopy's Choice, are crowding freezer sections in supermarkets they vie for shoppers' attention.Many of this new breed are about as low as they can go in calories, fat, sodium and cholesterol and still be palatable to most people.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | March 27, 2013
Like someone on a diet who can think about nothing but food, I feel bombarded by bad food news even as I try to clean up what is on my plate. I am not a vegan. I am not even a vegetarian. But I have been trying for a while now to clear the junk out of my diet the way I should be clearing the junk out of my closets. Bad carbs, red meat, fast food, salt, sugar and anything fried. Soft drinks, fruity drinks, processed foods and desserts are out, too. Whole grains, omega-3s, fresh or frozen fruits and vegetables, Greek yogurt, water and kale are in. And like any serial dieter, I fall on and off this food wagon, but I thought I was part of a pretty big crowd of older Americans who were watching their blood sugar levels and their cholesterol levels in exchange for a few more years on this mortal coil.
FEATURES
By Charlyne Varkonyi | November 28, 1990
Bad economic news can be good news for your diet in the long run.When the frills are gone, we go back to the basics. And this means by default we may be cutting the fat from our diets as well as from our budgets.Lean times mean lean meals. This doesn't mean you have to have a whole week's menus filled with hearty soups, beans with rice and boiled potatoes with cabbage. But it does mean you need to learn how tobalance more expensive meals with some of these low-fat, low-cost meals. And you can't get balance without learning to shop with a battle plan worthy of Operation Desert Shield.
FEATURES
By Carol J.G. Ward and Carol J.G. Ward,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | March 18, 1998
You might be a penny-pincher if:* The arrival of the Sunday grocery circulars are the highlight of your week.* Convenience foods are a dirty words in your kitchen.* Leftovers are your best friends.If any of the above describes you, you're not alone.A plea from a reader for money-saving grocery tips drew responses from others who shared strategies that help them cut their food bills. Gradecia Medlin of Gaston, S.C., condensed all the advice into one rule: "Grocery savings takes careful planning and determination."
NEWS
By Sandra Pinckney | April 3, 2005
I love Sundays. From the Sunday paper to Sunday supper, it's my day to recharge, relax and, most of all, to cook. When my daughter was little, I would spend the day cooking for the week. It made it easier to serve wholesome meals on school nights, if I didn't have to start from scratch. Things have changed a lot since then. There has been an explosion of convenience foods on the market ... everything you can imagine from precooked bacon to microwave mac and cheese. Fast-food restaurants are everywhere, and they make it so easy for you. With drive-through windows, you don't even have to get out of the car. Quick, cheap, convenient.
FEATURES
By Rosemary Black and Rosemary Black,New York Daily News | March 2, 1994
Temptations beckon from every corner. Soft music and enticing aromas fill the air, and a white-coated salesman offers samples and a smile. Before you know it, you've done it again -- spent more than you should have and gotten less than you should have.Sound like your favorite department store? Wrong. The scene -- acted out at least once a week for millions of Americans -- is your supermarket, where more than 10,000 items are competing for your food dollar.Many shoppers still practice tried-and-true methods to cut back spending -- like clipping coupons and going with a list.
FEATURES
By Susan Hipsley and Susan Hipsley,Special to The Sun | November 13, 1994
Thanksgiving is the only major holiday centered entirely around a meal. Of course, this means the one who prepares it 11 days from now will feel the weight of 370 years of tradition bearing down on her already overburdened shoulders.But T-day meal preparation doesn't have to be stressful. And cooking it certainly doesn't have to be as time-consuming as the first one in 1621 in Plymouth, Mass. The Pilgrims and Native Americans had to build a fire just to fix simple corn on the cob. We can give it a jolt of radar love and put it on the table.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | March 27, 2013
Like someone on a diet who can think about nothing but food, I feel bombarded by bad food news even as I try to clean up what is on my plate. I am not a vegan. I am not even a vegetarian. But I have been trying for a while now to clear the junk out of my diet the way I should be clearing the junk out of my closets. Bad carbs, red meat, fast food, salt, sugar and anything fried. Soft drinks, fruity drinks, processed foods and desserts are out, too. Whole grains, omega-3s, fresh or frozen fruits and vegetables, Greek yogurt, water and kale are in. And like any serial dieter, I fall on and off this food wagon, but I thought I was part of a pretty big crowd of older Americans who were watching their blood sugar levels and their cholesterol levels in exchange for a few more years on this mortal coil.
NEWS
By Sandra Pinckney | April 3, 2005
I love Sundays. From the Sunday paper to Sunday supper, it's my day to recharge, relax and, most of all, to cook. When my daughter was little, I would spend the day cooking for the week. It made it easier to serve wholesome meals on school nights, if I didn't have to start from scratch. Things have changed a lot since then. There has been an explosion of convenience foods on the market ... everything you can imagine from precooked bacon to microwave mac and cheese. Fast-food restaurants are everywhere, and they make it so easy for you. With drive-through windows, you don't even have to get out of the car. Quick, cheap, convenient.
FEATURES
By Carol J.G. Ward and Carol J.G. Ward,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | March 18, 1998
You might be a penny-pincher if:* The arrival of the Sunday grocery circulars are the highlight of your week.* Convenience foods are a dirty words in your kitchen.* Leftovers are your best friends.If any of the above describes you, you're not alone.A plea from a reader for money-saving grocery tips drew responses from others who shared strategies that help them cut their food bills. Gradecia Medlin of Gaston, S.C., condensed all the advice into one rule: "Grocery savings takes careful planning and determination."
FEATURES
By Joe Crea and Joe Crea,KNIGHT-RIDDER TRIBUNE | June 5, 1996
Had it not been for the numbness and tingling in my left arm, our routine run for provisions might have gone like any other swing through the grocery store, and this column would have provided a far more conventional approach to food.Fortunately, it was wake-up time in the canned foods aisle.That odd, eerie sensation in my arm wouldn't go away. It angered me, initially. "Aw, come on," I groused to no one in particular. "I don't have time for this."The irony was, I'd been standing there comparing the nutritional contents among different packages of convenience foods.
FEATURES
By Kim Upton and Kim Upton,LOS ANGELES TIMES SYNDICATE | October 15, 1995
Lately, my life feels as if the squeeze is on and I'm the orange. No matter how I plan, no matter how early I rise, there is not enough time to raise my son, keep my house clean, work a full-time job and have a good time. This is not even factoring in the strange recurrence of an additional task called dinner, which seems to arrive at our house each night -- invited or not. It's because time is spare that I've begun experimenting with shortcuts.And when it comes to dinner, some of those shortcuts have been inspired by cans with attractive labels and cute little boxes with sometimes hefty price tags.
FEATURES
By Susan Hipsley and Susan Hipsley,Special to The Sun | November 13, 1994
Thanksgiving is the only major holiday centered entirely around a meal. Of course, this means the one who prepares it 11 days from now will feel the weight of 370 years of tradition bearing down on her already overburdened shoulders.But T-day meal preparation doesn't have to be stressful. And cooking it certainly doesn't have to be as time-consuming as the first one in 1621 in Plymouth, Mass. The Pilgrims and Native Americans had to build a fire just to fix simple corn on the cob. We can give it a jolt of radar love and put it on the table.
FEATURES
By Rosemary Black and Rosemary Black,New York Daily News | March 2, 1994
Temptations beckon from every corner. Soft music and enticing aromas fill the air, and a white-coated salesman offers samples and a smile. Before you know it, you've done it again -- spent more than you should have and gotten less than you should have.Sound like your favorite department store? Wrong. The scene -- acted out at least once a week for millions of Americans -- is your supermarket, where more than 10,000 items are competing for your food dollar.Many shoppers still practice tried-and-true methods to cut back spending -- like clipping coupons and going with a list.
FEATURES
By Joe Crea and Joe Crea,KNIGHT-RIDDER TRIBUNE | June 5, 1996
Had it not been for the numbness and tingling in my left arm, our routine run for provisions might have gone like any other swing through the grocery store, and this column would have provided a far more conventional approach to food.Fortunately, it was wake-up time in the canned foods aisle.That odd, eerie sensation in my arm wouldn't go away. It angered me, initially. "Aw, come on," I groused to no one in particular. "I don't have time for this."The irony was, I'd been standing there comparing the nutritional contents among different packages of convenience foods.
FEATURES
By Kim Upton and Kim Upton,LOS ANGELES TIMES SYNDICATE | October 15, 1995
Lately, my life feels as if the squeeze is on and I'm the orange. No matter how I plan, no matter how early I rise, there is not enough time to raise my son, keep my house clean, work a full-time job and have a good time. This is not even factoring in the strange recurrence of an additional task called dinner, which seems to arrive at our house each night -- invited or not. It's because time is spare that I've begun experimenting with shortcuts.And when it comes to dinner, some of those shortcuts have been inspired by cans with attractive labels and cute little boxes with sometimes hefty price tags.
FEATURES
By Pat Dailey and Pat Dailey,Chicago Tribune | October 9, 1991
THE FOOD TRENDS for 1991 have been charted: safer fish, '60s-style hippie foods, two-dishwasher kitchens. But food trends are for trendwatchers and a small group of people clustered at the top of the foodie pyramid. It's another story for the rest of the world."In my next kitchen, I'd love to have a vending machine and a microwave oven -- forget about the stove," says Joan Coleman, half seriously.Coleman, who lives in Dixon, Ill., is the mother of two boys, ages 6 and 9. Like an ever-increasing number of women, she has a full-time job outside the home.
FEATURES
By New York Times News Service > | October 6, 1991
If the '80s were the "light" decade, then the '90s are the "healthy" decade. Supermarkets exploded in the 1980s with light foods promising fewer calories. But now low-calorie isn't enough. Today, food has to be healthful as well.Frozen dinners and entrees bearing names like Healthy Choice, Eating Right, Le Menu Healthy, Healthy Slices and for kids, Snoopy's Choice, are crowding freezer sections in supermarkets they vie for shoppers' attention.Many of this new breed are about as low as they can go in calories, fat, sodium and cholesterol and still be palatable to most people.
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