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NEWS
March 28, 2012
Regarding the recent debate on birth control pills and their morality, if a Roman Catholic woman can afford to buy the pills and then uses them, is she a sinner? No one seems to address this conundrum. Given their ability to purchase the pill, how do Christian women who use birth control against the rules of their religion rationalize that decision? One way is a perpetual confession of one's sins, which suggests hypocrisy. Another is to stand up and challenge one's religion.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Jaclyn Peiser and The Baltimore Sun | March 19, 2014
Wedding etiquette doesn't just involve knowing which fork to use when eating your starter salad -- it's way more than that. It could involve thank-you notes, destination weddings and deciding who pays that hefty reception bill. We asked Lizzie Post of the Emily Post Institute (emilypost.com) and co-author, with her sister Anna, of "Emily Post Wedding Etiquette, 6th Edition," about how to approach those awkward situations that may arise when planning your wedding. If it's a destination wedding, is the couple responsible to pay for at least part of the expenses of guests?
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NEWS
November 29, 2012
U.N. Ambassador Susan Rice has become a willing pawn in Senate Republicans' efforts to force President Barack Obama into a costly and unnecessary fight over who will serve as his secretary of state when Hillary Clinton leaves that post in the new year. Once a trio of Republicans announced they would block Ms. Rice's confirmation for a job to which she had not been appointed, her aggressive efforts to smooth matters over have only given her opponents more opportunity to put the president in a box. Secretary of state is a position for which presidents do not typically have to use political capital, but now, at a time when Mr. Obama needs every bit of power he gained through re-election, he is being forced to expend it to defend someone he may or may not have intended to nominate in the first place.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | November 13, 2013
With last Saturday's 45-30 victory over Franklin & Marshall, the No. 8 Johns Hopkins football team captured its third straight Centennial Conference title and the program's ninth championship. So does that make Saturday's regular-season finale at McDaniel meaningless? Not to coach Jim Margraff. “You look at each game to win,” he said Wednesday morning. “I know exactly what you're asking. ... I've talked to our guys already. They're excited and they want to get rolling.” The Blue Jays (9-0 overall and 8-0 in the conference)
NEWS
By Peter A. Jay | September 28, 1997
HAVRE DE GRACE -- It was still early, the end-of-summer sun just beginning to glisten on the dew, when Matt showed up at the barn in his camouflage clothing. ''I could use a little help,'' he said.It was the first morning of the new bow-and-arrow deer season, and Matt had been out in the woods long before sunrise, up in the same tree his father has favored for many years. It's a good location, and at first light he'd had a shot. He'd hit his deer squarely. In fact, the arrow passed right through it. But then the deer had bounded away.
NEWS
By Cynthia Tucker | September 12, 2005
ATLANTA - A week after Hurricane Katrina roiled the waters of the Mississippi and Lake Pontchartrain and flooded southeastern Louisiana, conservative commentator George Will compared the crisis with the urban riots of the 1960s. On ABC's This Week, Mr. Will voiced skepticism about the prospects for economic recovery in the region. "I hope New Orleans recovers," he said. "Newark hasn't from the '67 riots. Detroit hasn't from the '67 riots." At the time, it seemed an odd moment in an otherwise mundane discussion of the politics of natural disaster, since Katrina's devastation was fueled by nature, not social unrest.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | February 28, 1993
Few movies have ignited the public imagination like Neil Jordan's "The Crying Game." Even today, a full three months after its release and more than a week after the Academy of Motion Pictures effectively outed its co-star with a nomination for a role in a gender different from the one in which he begins the movie, a movie critic gets calls."
SPORTS
By Ray Frager | December 21, 2008
Titans@Steelers 1 p.m. [chs. 13, 9] This game presents quite a conundrum - for the officials. Both teams have benefited from rather, uh, curious calls this season in games against the Ravens. The Steelers got that mystery-plane replay reversal last week, and the Titans were awarded a fortuitous roughing-the-passer penalty on a play where Kerry Collins felt less pressure than you'll get at Christmas dinner from Mom about giving her grandkids. So, with no Ravens in the game, which team gets today's bogus call?
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | January 28, 1992
Q. How is safe sex like free lunch? A. It is what there is no such thing as.Bush is wiping out affirmative action. No tinpot Klansman is going to steal his thunder again.We are going to sell corn to Soviet republics and if they pay for it on time we are going to sell them even more. Some people call that foreign aid, but it is unclear which side is being aided.American Jews cherish Yitzhak Shamir's country, not his policies. There's a difference.Chesapeake conundrum: Oil or the last oyster, choose one.
FEATURES
By Michael Dresser | November 15, 1995
1993 Ridge Geyserville ($22)The Thanksgiving conundrum strikes again. The fact is, the traditional turkey dinner defies wine match-ups, but one of the better ones I've found is a great California zinfandel. Now Ridge's classic Geyserville bottling is no longer a legal zinfandel, with only about 60 percent of that varietal in the blend, but it still conveys much of the character of that exquisite grape. Overall, it's an exceptional wine that's evolving each vintage toward a style all its own, not pureley zin. But it has all the blackberry fruit and spice and smokiness that helps great zin stand up to all Thanksgiving can throw at it (except the dreaded sweet potatoes)
NEWS
November 29, 2012
U.N. Ambassador Susan Rice has become a willing pawn in Senate Republicans' efforts to force President Barack Obama into a costly and unnecessary fight over who will serve as his secretary of state when Hillary Clinton leaves that post in the new year. Once a trio of Republicans announced they would block Ms. Rice's confirmation for a job to which she had not been appointed, her aggressive efforts to smooth matters over have only given her opponents more opportunity to put the president in a box. Secretary of state is a position for which presidents do not typically have to use political capital, but now, at a time when Mr. Obama needs every bit of power he gained through re-election, he is being forced to expend it to defend someone he may or may not have intended to nominate in the first place.
NEWS
March 28, 2012
Regarding the recent debate on birth control pills and their morality, if a Roman Catholic woman can afford to buy the pills and then uses them, is she a sinner? No one seems to address this conundrum. Given their ability to purchase the pill, how do Christian women who use birth control against the rules of their religion rationalize that decision? One way is a perpetual confession of one's sins, which suggests hypocrisy. Another is to stand up and challenge one's religion.
NEWS
By Rob Levine | September 6, 2011
My daughter Arielle had her first day of kindergarten last week. Parents were invited to stay in the classroom through circle time. As I sat cross-legged next to my wife on our portion of the magic circle, I listened to morning announcements with a renewed sense of interest - not as a parent, but as a food marketer. I have spent a good portion of the past 13 years working with manufacturers to sell food and beverage products into school lunch programs. And while I'm well versed in federal and state guidelines, including "bread equivalents," whole grain requirements, commodity programs and menu cycles, I have not looked at school lunch from the vantage point of the gatekeeper audience: parents.
NEWS
By George Liebmann | November 22, 2010
The level of youth unemployment, the highest since records began to be kept on the present system in 1978, is the great undiscussed issue in American politics. The numbers for July 2010, a month when youth employment usually reaches a seasonal high because of summer jobs programs, showed that fewer than half of those between 16 and 24 were employed — 48.9 percent — compared to a record high of 70 percent in 1988. The unemployment rate was 19.1 percent in 2010, compared to 9.6 percent in 2000.
NEWS
August 23, 2010
Farming, according to President Harry S. Truman, a man familiar with rural life, depended on "good manure. " When Mr. Truman's wife Bess was asked why the president couldn't use the more delicate word "fertilizer," she replied that it had taken her 25 years to get him to say "manure. " Whatever it is called — litter, droppings, excreta — it is a major factor in chicken farming, as anyone who has been caught downwind of a chicken house can attest. Maryland produces nearly 300 million broilers per year, and a byproduct of that process is an estimated 400,000 pounds of what the industry refers to as "chicken litter.
BUSINESS
By JAY HANCOCK | June 1, 2005
Alan Greenspan is finally worrying publicly about asset prices. After famously staying silent while the 1990s stock bubble swelled to unsustainable size, the Federal Reserve chairman seems to be responding to critics who say he should coach investors when he thinks they're not getting a good deal. Problem is, investors aren't listening. So far Greenspan's attempts to talk down the bond and housing markets have had zero effect. Such demonstrated impotence might be even worse than if he had never opened his mouth in the first place.
FEATURES
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | July 7, 1996
At some of the country's best wine shops, there exists an institution known as the "bargain bin."Into this bin, the wine merchants deposit a hodgepodge of bottles. Sometimes they will be wines that weren't quite up to snuff, but some will be overlooked treasures -- relegated to the bin because the retailer wants to clear some shelf space.This is my version of the bargain bin -- the scraps of full columns that never came together, maybe a small gem of a recommendation and probably a dose of vinegar or two.Safe in portThere's good news for those who savor the best-known agricultural export of Oporto, Portugal.
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