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NEWS
August 6, 2012
I believe The Sun, along with many other news outlets, misses the major issues regarding the Chick-fil-Astory: Why is there such intolerance for CEO Dan Cathy's personal views, and such disregard for his freedom of speech ("Chick-fil-A gets busted by the thought police," Aug. 2)? In his business practices, the man never treated gay individuals prejudicially, nor did he post his views in his restaurants. Instead, he responded honestly to a direct question about his views on marriage in a few interviews and chose to contribute to organizations that supported traditional family values.
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SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | October 8, 2014
Redshirt junior quarterback Moses Skillon made a brief appearance in Morgan State's 24-9 victory at Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference foe Florida A&M last Saturday, playing on one series in the third quarter and another in the fourth. But coach Lee Hull said Tuesday that redshirt senior Robert Council is still the starter for the Bears (3-3 overall and 2-1 in the league). “Robert's our quarterback,” Hull said during his weekly conference call organized by the MEAC. “We're going to ride with Robert for the whole season.
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NEWS
By Staff report | March 25, 1992
The embattled president of Annapolis' Black Officers Association will remain at the helm, despite the controversy following his recent criticism of the city's police chief.Association members met Mondaynight to discuss the impromptu news conference that Officer George Kelley had two weeks ago. At the time, Kelley accused Chief Harold Robbins of racial intimidation and of trying to weaken the 9-year-old association.His remarks surprised and angered senior officers, who said they knew nothing about the news conference and fully supported the chief.
SPORTS
By Matt Zenitz and Baltimore Sun Media Group | October 5, 2014
Maryland football players and coaches spent Sunday breaking down and critiquing their 52-24 loss Saturday to Ohio State at Byrd Stadium. Now the Terps hope to take advantage of their bye week before preparing for their Oct. 18 home game against Iowa. In particular, Maryland (4-2, 1-1 Big Ten Conference) will look to get as healthy as possible. Several players, including starting outside linebacker Matt Robinson (Atholton) and reserve defensive backs Zach Dancel and Daniel Ezeagwu, missed Saturday's game against the Buckeyes, now ranked No. 15. Starters such as inside linebackers Cole Farrand and L.A. Goree also have been playing through injuries.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,Sun Staff Writer | April 14, 1994
R. Edward Shilling is known for a bold style, and his time as superintendent has been fraught with controversy.The past two years have brought one controversy after another, but the superintendent said he never had a year that didn't.He said recent years have not been more difficult than the first -- the controversies just change."I think the [superintendent's position] is stressful and controversial most of the time," Mr. Shilling said.Among the controversies he has faced:* He has decried a national conservative movement that he said has a political agenda and steadfastly supported that movement's main target: outcomes-based education.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | July 19, 2012
For the past seven years, Darnella Parks and her entire family - from toddler nieces to her 84-year-old grandmother - have attended Artscape. They come for the crafts, the food and, most of all, the live entertainment. But this year, the 33-year-old Towson resident and her family are skipping Friday's opening night - not because of the heat or the crowds, but because of the music. Brian McKnight, the 16-time Grammy nominee who for years built a reputation as a clean-cut, R&B ladies' man, is scheduled to take Artscape's main stage Friday night.
NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,Staff writer | October 31, 1990
For 22 years, C. Merritt Pumphrey's job as clerk of the Circuit Court has been under lock-and-key, but the past year has brought forth a development seldom seen in the county election spectrum.Pumphrey, whose past opponents have never gathered more than 39 percent of the vote, is facing tough opposition from a challenger looking to bring controversy into a traditionally low-key contest.Margaret Rappaport, a 55-year-old former school teacher who has openly criticized what she calls "The Merritt System" of running the clerk's office, is hoping to put Pumphrey out of business.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | February 23, 2005
Circumstances surrounding the death of one of the major characters in Clint Eastwood's Million Dollar Baby have some columnists, pundits and advocacy groups railing against the movie as immoral, sacrilegious and yet another example of Hollywood's left-leaning bias - and certainly not worthy of its status as an Oscar front-runner. The controversy's effect on the film's Oscar chances (it has been nominated for seven awards, including best picture) remain to be seen. But when you're in the race for an Academy Award, it's likely that controversy will follow.
NEWS
February 22, 1999
PLACES OF worship used to be considered integral to a community. In some suburban communities, however, churches and synagogues now sometimes are derided as intrusive. Neighbors say these institutions -- some much larger than the places they replace -- will alter the look and feel of their surroundings.The issue arose in recent years when Baltimore's historic Bethel A.M.E. Church wanted to build in Baltimore County; when Riverdale Baptist, a 2,000-member congregation in Prince George's County, sought to move to southern Anne Arundel; and when First Baptist Church of Guilford proposed a new sanctuary-community center, which the Howard County Board of Appeals approved last fall amid controversy -- and then inexplicably rejected this month.
NEWS
By Brenda J. Buote and Brenda J. Buote,SUN STAFF | October 9, 1997
For two decades, few people have understood the multicolored metal sculpture outside Baltimore's federal courthouse. Even fewer have liked it.As workers at the Edward A. Garmatz federal courthouse finished dismantling "Baltimore Federal" yesterday and sent it away for a five-month makeover, many who work at the building expressed hope it would never return."
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2014
I joined Christine Brennan, of "USA Today," and Howard Kurtz on "Media Buzz" today to talk about TMZ and the performance of mainstream media in covering -- or not covering -- the Ray Rice story. I was at first surpised to hear Brennan, who knows this turf as well as anyone, say an argument could be made that it is "the biggest controversy to ever hit a U.S. sports league. " But having thought about it since, I think she could be right. #sigshell { float: left; width: 320px; height: 52px; margin: 20px 0px; display: block; }
SPORTS
Don Markus and The Baltimore Sun | August 28, 2014
COLLEGE PARK - There are no commemorative T-shirts worn at practice to remind Sasho Cirovski and his Maryland men's soccer team of their controversial loss to Notre Dame in the final of last year's College Cup. There is no new slogan etched onto the walls or scrawled across a whiteboard in the The memory of what happened last December - and the seemingly obvious Fighting Irish hand ball that was missed early in what turned out to be a gut-wrenching, 2-1...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dan Singer and The Baltimore Sun | August 15, 2014
When inspiration hits, Wayne Coyne needs to act on it. “You just feel like, 'This is what I want to say right now,' and you have to absolutely say it before you can be rational again,” the Flaming Lips frontman said on the phone recently from Fredonia, N.Y., where he was working on an upcoming release.  The Oklahoma-based Flaming Lips - who headline the Silopanna Music Festival on Saturday - are entering the fourth decade of a career that...
NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | August 8, 2014
Baltimore's new curfew fell like an unseen curtain across the city Friday night, and on many blocks, children continued to play outside for the first few minutes, oblivious to the controversial law. But at Poe Homes in West Baltimore, two mothers sitting on their front porches said they were obeying the rules willingly and happily. "It gets dark at 8 o'clock," said Nicole Williams as her 8-year-old son, Isaiah Turner, ran around just before the new law fell into place. "What child has reason to be outside?"
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | July 31, 2014
Criticism of President Barack Obama's nominee to lead the Social Security Administration appeared to evaporate Thursday at a confirmation hearing that featured few questions about controversial service cuts and recent allegations of mismanagement. Carolyn W. Colvin's hearing before the Senate Finance Committee - which took place hours ahead of a scheduled monthlong recess - drew only two Republicans and lasted less than an hour, an indication the Maryland native might face an easier path to the job than initially expected.
NEWS
July 31, 2014
The wonderful McKeldin Fountain at Baltimore's Inner Harbor was running beautifully recently. The site was clean thanks to a team of workers, and there were several families there enjoying this important architectural landmark with its bridges, waterfalls, sculpture and passageways. I can't understand why The Sun is refusing to cover the controversy over losing such an important structure. The city plans to remove this piece of Baltimore history to replace it with nothing but grass.
SPORTS
April 27, 2007
Good morning -- Schilling controversy -- Red Sox Nation probably is also upset no one here pronounces it "sawx."
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | July 27, 2014
The University of Maryland, University College has a history of experimentation. With its roots in a 1920s night school, the institution expanded in the 1940s and '50s into Europe and Asia to educate military personnel. Then as the Internet flourished, it embraced online learning. Now the state university is experimenting again. This month, President Javier Miyares unveiled a proposal from a group of business leaders he assembled that would tie the university's future more closely to the private sector.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | July 5, 2014
Anyone who wants a job next year at Anne Arundel Medical Center — whether as a surgeon or security guard — will have to prove they don't smoke or use tobacco. The Annapolis hospital's new hiring policy might be controversial, but it is legal in Maryland and more than half of the United States. And it's a type of job screening that is gaining favor with employers — from hospitals to companies such as Alaska Airlines — trying to control rising health costs and cultivate a healthier, more productive workforce.
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