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NEWS
July 20, 2002
A PARAPLEGIC man is suing a Florida strip joint for being in violation of his civil rights because there is no wheelchair access to upstairs private rooms where he could get a "lap dance." The club owner said he could use a private room downstairs. But the plaintiff's lawyer replied that "separate but equal is not good enough." Sometimes, on controversial issues, we're conflicted as to whether this or that "constitutional right" can possibly be what the Founding Fathers intended. On this one, we're sure.
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NEWS
By Olivia Bobrowsky and Olivia Bobrowsky,olivia.bobrowsky@baltsun.com | July 5, 2009
Josh Cohen grew up a saxophone player, studying music at the University of Maryland. Then Bill Clinton ran for president in 1992, and Cohen switched paths at the age of 18. "That was the first national presidential campaign that I really followed, and it just engaged me in a way that nothing had engaged me before," said the Annapolis native who's now in the race for mayor. "I realized that people can actually devote their time to working on issues that make a difference." The next semester, Cohen dropped his music classes and ended up graduating with a degree in economics.
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NEWS
April 15, 1997
YOUR APRIL 9 editorial, ''Netanyahu gives not an inch,'' in its interpretation of the facts, is clearly biased.As the democratically elected prime minister of Israel, Benjamin Netanyahu has sought to abide by the Oslo accords he inherited from his predecessor.Israel would grant limited autonomy to Palestinians, and the PLO would renounce violence and formally expunge from its charter articles that call for Israel's destruction.The parties expressly left other controversial issues -- such as the status of Jerusalem and the character of a Palestinian entity -- for later negotiation.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | September 24, 2004
DERRY, N.H. - The George W. Bush for President Show is now playing in a state near you, and it's a marvel of organization and affirmation. When the president flew into this southern New Hampshire Republican stronghold the other afternoon for what was billed as a town meeting, the state party and the Bush state campaign team assembled a crowd of nearly 2,000 faithful to greet him, packing a large gym. Town hall meetings are a storied tradition in New...
NEWS
November 2, 1994
District 33 is the focal point of some of Anne Arundel County's most controversial issues. With the departure of Del. John G. Gary, who is running for county executive, and retiring Del. Elizabeth Smith-Anderson, many strong candidates for the House of Delegates stepped forward to deal with these problems. Alas, some of the most promising ones lost in the primary; still, voters have the chance to elect three solid representatives Tuesday.They are two-term incumbent Democrat Marsha G. Perry; Democrat David G. Boschert, a county councilman for 10 years; and Republican Robert C. Baldwin, a building contractor, civic leader, moderate party activist and protege of former Rep. Marjorie Holt.
NEWS
September 17, 1993
Dr. Joycelyn Elders, the nation's new surgeon general, took office last week having made it clear that she intends to tackle some tough and controversial issues. At the top of her list is the country's epidemic of adolescent pregnancy, a problem Dr. Elders has targeted as a leading cause of poverty and a contributor to many other social ills, from infant mortality to welfare dependency. So far, however, the federal government has found no coherent or effective approach to the issue.One of the first challenges facing the new surgeon general is to define a national agenda for facing up to a problem that is putting increasing burdens on state and local governments.
NEWS
By Donna E. Boller and Donna E. Boller,Staff writer | January 19, 1992
Critics of a program on homosexuality at Wilde Lake High School lastfall say they aren't entirely happy with the school board's responseto their concerns, but believe they did get school officials to opensimilar programs in the future to opposing viewpoints.A similar issue is expected to come before the school board this week. A group of parents plans to petition the board to bar a scheduled talk on living with AIDS to eighth-graders at Glenwood Middle School. A homosexual man infected with the AIDS virus is scheduled to speak.
NEWS
July 16, 1996
COMMISSIONER W. Benjamin Brown's planned heart-bypass surgery today may result in a pause in the decision-making of the Carroll County Board of Commissioners, but we expect his absence from county government will be a short one.So does Mr. Brown, as he installs electronic communications equipment at home to ease his re-entry during recuperation. He pledges to resume active involvement with civic affairs long before the end of a three-month recovery period urged by his physicians.On a three-member board, important issues are often decided ** by a single vote.
NEWS
By Joel McCord and Candus Thomson and Joel McCord and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | August 9, 2001
To the surprise of her staff and state environmental leaders, Sarah Taylor-Rogers resigned abruptly yesterday as secretary of the Department of Natural Resources. A former assistant secretary, she was named to the post two years ago after Gov. Parris N. Glendening abruptly fired her predecessor, John R. Griffin. A Glendening spokesman gave no reason for Taylor-Rogers' resignation, which is effective immediately. "She chose to resign," said Michael Morrill, the spokesman. "The governor thanked her for her work at DNR."
NEWS
By Pat Gilbert and Pat Gilbert,Sun Staff Writer | August 23, 1994
Republican Douglas B. Riley and Democrat Vincent J. Gardina entered the Baltimore County Council four years ago riding the wave of anti-incumbent fervor.Both came from community activist backgrounds. And a year ago, both seemed likely to win re-election in their party's primary without opposition.Although they are still the favored incumbents, they now face candidates who have emerged to challenge them in the way they challenged other incumbents in 1990 -- by claiming they have failed to do the job voters elected them to do.In the 4th District, Mr. Riley faces a Sept.
NEWS
July 20, 2002
A PARAPLEGIC man is suing a Florida strip joint for being in violation of his civil rights because there is no wheelchair access to upstairs private rooms where he could get a "lap dance." The club owner said he could use a private room downstairs. But the plaintiff's lawyer replied that "separate but equal is not good enough." Sometimes, on controversial issues, we're conflicted as to whether this or that "constitutional right" can possibly be what the Founding Fathers intended. On this one, we're sure.
NEWS
By Joel McCord and Candus Thomson and Joel McCord and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | August 9, 2001
To the surprise of her staff and state environmental leaders, Sarah Taylor-Rogers resigned abruptly yesterday as secretary of the Department of Natural Resources. A former assistant secretary, she was named to the post two years ago after Gov. Parris N. Glendening abruptly fired her predecessor, John R. Griffin. A Glendening spokesman gave no reason for Taylor-Rogers' resignation, which is effective immediately. "She chose to resign," said Michael Morrill, the spokesman. "The governor thanked her for her work at DNR."
NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,SUN STAFF | June 27, 2001
McHENRY - A marina owner wants to launch a bigger, better tour boat, but some neighbors say the vessel should remain dry-docked. A would-be entrepreneur pitches the idea of a floating hot dog stand, and businesses along the shore cry foul. Jet Skis and other personal watercraft? Some love the thrill; others see them as noisy pests that have no place in the tranquil coves of Deep Creek Lake. At this Western Maryland getaway, most folks agree that the spring fishing's been good, and hopes are high for a lucrative summer tourist season.
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,SUN STAFF | July 15, 1999
Bringing his surging Republican presidential campaign into heavily Democratic Maryland, Texas Gov. George W. Bush raised about $400,000 at a Baltimore fund-raiser last night after endorsing the importance of faith-based institutions during a stop at an east-side community center.Confident and folksy, Bush energized a crowd of about 500 at a downtown hotel with a 20-minute speech that outlined a socially compassionate, fiscally conservative agenda but steered clear of hot-button issues such as abortion.
NEWS
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 29, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Armed with a flush federal budget surplus, President Clinton will propose significant changes in Medicare today, seeking to extend its solvency until 2025 while providing a new prescription drug benefit for the elderly and disabled.The drug benefit, a voluntary plan that would allow all Medicare recipients to buy subsidized coverage of their medication, would be one of the most fundamental changes in the government health insurance program since its inception 34 years ago.Currently, traditional Medicare pays only for medication prescribed during a hospital stay.
NEWS
October 14, 1998
IN ITS picturesque 19th-century atmosphere, Bolton Hill feels like Baltimore's Georgetown, without the crowds.But there is one other significant difference: Unlike Georgetown, Bolton Hill continues to battle to achieve stability. That's why many residents are trying to get rid of Chang's Mart, a liquor and convenience store at Eutaw Place and Wilson Street.They don't like the store's clients who are so poor (or dependent on drink) that they buy liquor by the miniature bottle and beer by the container.
NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and JoAnna Daemmrich,Sun Staff Writer | September 26, 1994
For those who delight in political theater, this is the perfect season to venture to the ornate, vaulted chamber that's center stage for the Baltimore City Council.An intense, potentially divisive competition for the city's three highest positions is under way, infusing the usual posturing with broader significance. As the 19-member council returns tonight from summer recess, its legislative agenda is likely to be overshadowed by political interests.Most of the all-Democratic group already has taken sides as the feuding between Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke and Council President Mary Pat Clarke continues to flare up. Just last week, Mrs. Clarke called for Housing Commissioner Daniel P. Henson III to step aside in the wake of a sharply critical federal audit, while the mayor stood firmly behind him.Mrs.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | September 24, 2004
DERRY, N.H. - The George W. Bush for President Show is now playing in a state near you, and it's a marvel of organization and affirmation. When the president flew into this southern New Hampshire Republican stronghold the other afternoon for what was billed as a town meeting, the state party and the Bush state campaign team assembled a crowd of nearly 2,000 faithful to greet him, packing a large gym. Town hall meetings are a storied tradition in New...
NEWS
April 15, 1997
YOUR APRIL 9 editorial, ''Netanyahu gives not an inch,'' in its interpretation of the facts, is clearly biased.As the democratically elected prime minister of Israel, Benjamin Netanyahu has sought to abide by the Oslo accords he inherited from his predecessor.Israel would grant limited autonomy to Palestinians, and the PLO would renounce violence and formally expunge from its charter articles that call for Israel's destruction.The parties expressly left other controversial issues -- such as the status of Jerusalem and the character of a Palestinian entity -- for later negotiation.
NEWS
By Erin Texeira and Dan Morse and Erin Texeira and Dan Morse,SUN STAFF | April 13, 1997
Personality and style -- rather than issues -- will likely be foremost on voters' minds in next weekend's Columbia Council elections.That's because the council approved in February two controversial sports facilities and because other hot-button issues have slowly fizzled in recent months.But with five contested elections this year -- in Town Center and Dorsey's Search, Hickory Ridge, Long Reach and Oakland Mills villages -- voters have a generous sampling of personalities from which to choose in the voting Saturday at various village shopping centers.
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