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Controlled Burning

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NEWS
May 13, 2000
THE BIGGEST casualty of the wildfire now sweeping through north New Mexico may not be the hundreds of homes burned in Los Alamos. It could well be the credibility of the National Park Service and sister agencies that manage hundreds of millions of acres of publicly owned lands. Particularly vulnerable is the long-accepted practice of controlled burning -- setting small fires to burn off dried brush and trees to prevent the eruption of wildfires. Hundreds of thousands of acres are purposely burned each year to create fire breaks, cleared areas beyond which natural or accidental fires cannot advance because of a lack of fuel.
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NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | April 10, 2014
A snowy winter kept the state's brush fire season at bay into March, but now Maryland forestry officials are conducting controlled burns to prevent accidental blazes later this spring. The Maryland Department of Natural Resources is conducting burns at Sandy Point State Park and on Hart-Miller Island on Thursday, officials said. Trained forest service crews set the fires using torches fueled by a solution of diesel and gasoline, said  Monte Mitchell, state fire superviser with the natural resources department's forest service.
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NEWS
By Amanda Angel and Amanda Angel,SUN STAFF | October 26, 2003
IN MARYLAND, the serpentine barrens run through the northwest corner of Cecil County and enter Harford just south of Broad Creek and perpendicular to the Susquehanna River. The geological formation arcs through Mill Green and turns up in patches along Deer Creek and Little Deer Creek. The largest concentration of serpentinite in Maryland is at Soldiers Delight Natural Environmental Area in Owings Mills, where the thin soil and unique vegetation is on display to the public. According to Martin F. Schmidt Jr. in the book Maryland's Geology, "Serpentinite's attractive green color has led to its use as a decorative rock known as `green marble,' " which is a famous product of the Harford County quarry at Whiteford.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey and Annie Linskey,Sun reporter | February 16, 2007
The day before a fire cadet died in a live-fire training exercise in a city rowhouse, another cadet and a fire lieutenant were injured in a similar controlled burn in East Baltimore, fire officials acknowledged yesterday. It took several days for the Fire Department to confirm the earlier exercise, and a spokesman declined to provide additional details. A recruit, Daniel Nott, suffered a first-degree burn on his cheek and a firefighter, Lt. Sam Darby, was burned on his hand, fire officials said.
NEWS
January 12, 1994
FIRE* Snydersburg: Hampstead, Manchester and Arcadia of Baltimore County responded to a reported barn fire on Snydersburg at 12:50 p.m. yesterday.It was later reported as a controlled burning.Units were out for 15 minutes.
NEWS
May 19, 1995
FIRE* Gamber: Gamber was dispatched to a large brush fire on Niner Road at 9:29 a.m. Wednesday. Units discovered the blaze was a controlled burning and returned to their station in 21 minutes.
NEWS
May 31, 1994
FIRE* Winfield: Winfield, New Windsor and Mount Airy were dispatched to a reported house fire in the 1700 block of Bloom Road at 5 p.m. Wednesday. The first engine on the scene discovered a controlled burning at a house under construction. The blaze was covered with dirt by the construction workers. Units were out 17 minutes.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 26, 1998
ORLANDO, Fla. -- Faced with more long-range drought conditions in Florida, state officials are seeking $35 million for an aggressive controlled-burning program to prevent a repetition of last summer's fires, which destroyed more than 500,000 acres.The state Agriculture Department, criticized by agriculture groups and timber landowners for not being aggressive enough in using controlled burning before last summer's fires, said it planned to burn considerably more than the 2 million acres of public and private land that were burned in 1998.
NEWS
April 7, 1998
FireSykesville: Firefighters from Gamber and Liberty Road in Baltimore County assisted Sykesville at 7: 43 p.m. Saturday, responding to a chimney fire in the 1800 block of Littlewood Court. Units were out 40 minutes.Sykesville: Firefighters responded at 11: 25 p.m. Friday to a controlled burning on Marriottsville Road. Units were out 18 minutes.Pub Date: 4/07/98
NEWS
June 8, 1999
FireLineboro: Firefighters from Lineboro, Manchester, Hampstead, Glen Rock, Pa., and Pleasant Hill, Pa., responded at 2: 19 p.m. Saturday, responding to a house fire in the 4200 block of E. Main St. Units were out 46 minutes.Hampstead: Firefighters responded at 3: 45 p.m. Sunday to a controlled burning in the 1200 block of Woodland Court. Units were out 40 minutes.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,SUN STAFF | November 25, 2003
Clad in yellow flame-retardant gear, a handful of men walked through Soldiers Delight Natural Environment Area yesterday, dribbling flame from metal cans and turning the grassland into what looked like black cotton candy. Soldiers Delight is a 1,900-acre serpentine grassland, an unusual ecological system that supports dozens of rare or endangered plants and insects. But unless it is periodically cleared through controlled burning, other plant species - enemy No. 1 is the pine tree - slowly manage to encroach and change the character of the soil.
NEWS
By Amanda Angel and Amanda Angel,SUN STAFF | October 26, 2003
IN MARYLAND, the serpentine barrens run through the northwest corner of Cecil County and enter Harford just south of Broad Creek and perpendicular to the Susquehanna River. The geological formation arcs through Mill Green and turns up in patches along Deer Creek and Little Deer Creek. The largest concentration of serpentinite in Maryland is at Soldiers Delight Natural Environmental Area in Owings Mills, where the thin soil and unique vegetation is on display to the public. According to Martin F. Schmidt Jr. in the book Maryland's Geology, "Serpentinite's attractive green color has led to its use as a decorative rock known as `green marble,' " which is a famous product of the Harford County quarry at Whiteford.
NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,SUN STAFF | September 9, 2000
Virginia pine and greenbrier grew wild and unchecked, smothering native grasses and choking rare wildflowers. Then, torched, the scrub gave way to a charred wasteland. Now, not even a year later, a prairie: acres of Indian grass swaying in the breeze, drifts of rust and gold that seem more Great Plains than Owings Mills. "Can't you just see the buffalo coming across the horizon?" says Laura Mitchell, an ecologist with the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service. "This is a whole different spot." Different, and ecologically healthier than at this time last year, say Mitchell and the other conservationists who gathered yesterday to assess the results of a "controlled burn" at Soldiers Delight Natural Environment Area.
NEWS
May 13, 2000
THE BIGGEST casualty of the wildfire now sweeping through north New Mexico may not be the hundreds of homes burned in Los Alamos. It could well be the credibility of the National Park Service and sister agencies that manage hundreds of millions of acres of publicly owned lands. Particularly vulnerable is the long-accepted practice of controlled burning -- setting small fires to burn off dried brush and trees to prevent the eruption of wildfires. Hundreds of thousands of acres are purposely burned each year to create fire breaks, cleared areas beyond which natural or accidental fires cannot advance because of a lack of fuel.
NEWS
June 16, 1999
FiresHampstead: Firefighters responded at 4: 51 p.m. Monday to wires down in the 3900 block of Sunset Drive. Units were out 45 minutes.Hampstead: Firefighters responded at 2: 55 p.m. Monday to a wash detail in the 700 block of Hanover Pike. Units were out 33 minutes.Manchester: Firefighters responded at 11: 25 p.m. Saturday to a fire alarm in the 2200 block of Old Fort Schoolhouse Road. Units were out 25 minutes.Manchester: Firefighters responded at 8: 38 p.m. Saturday to a controlled burning in the 4200 block of Millers Station Road.
NEWS
June 8, 1999
FireLineboro: Firefighters from Lineboro, Manchester, Hampstead, Glen Rock, Pa., and Pleasant Hill, Pa., responded at 2: 19 p.m. Saturday, responding to a house fire in the 4200 block of E. Main St. Units were out 46 minutes.Hampstead: Firefighters responded at 3: 45 p.m. Sunday to a controlled burning in the 1200 block of Woodland Court. Units were out 40 minutes.
NEWS
June 16, 1999
FiresHampstead: Firefighters responded at 4: 51 p.m. Monday to wires down in the 3900 block of Sunset Drive. Units were out 45 minutes.Hampstead: Firefighters responded at 2: 55 p.m. Monday to a wash detail in the 700 block of Hanover Pike. Units were out 33 minutes.Manchester: Firefighters responded at 11: 25 p.m. Saturday to a fire alarm in the 2200 block of Old Fort Schoolhouse Road. Units were out 25 minutes.Manchester: Firefighters responded at 8: 38 p.m. Saturday to a controlled burning in the 4200 block of Millers Station Road.
NEWS
January 21, 1998
State fire marshals are investigating a two-alarm fire that heavily damaged a Main Street building in Sykesville early yesterday.Five residents who lived in a second-floor apartment were displaced by the blaze, which started in the attic about 1: 30 a.m. No one was injured, state fire marshals said.The fire was discovered by Michael S. Wood, 40, who lived in the apartment with Brenda Wood, 42, Luke Wood, 16, Melanie Dodd 17, and 4-month-old Tyler Wood.Damage to the 2 1/2 -story wood building, owned by Kevin M. O'Connor of Eldersburg, was estimated at $60,000 for the structure and $10,000 for the contents.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 26, 1998
ORLANDO, Fla. -- Faced with more long-range drought conditions in Florida, state officials are seeking $35 million for an aggressive controlled-burning program to prevent a repetition of last summer's fires, which destroyed more than 500,000 acres.The state Agriculture Department, criticized by agriculture groups and timber landowners for not being aggressive enough in using controlled burning before last summer's fires, said it planned to burn considerably more than the 2 million acres of public and private land that were burned in 1998.
NEWS
April 7, 1998
FireSykesville: Firefighters from Gamber and Liberty Road in Baltimore County assisted Sykesville at 7: 43 p.m. Saturday, responding to a chimney fire in the 1800 block of Littlewood Court. Units were out 40 minutes.Sykesville: Firefighters responded at 11: 25 p.m. Friday to a controlled burning on Marriottsville Road. Units were out 18 minutes.Pub Date: 4/07/98
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