Advertisement
HomeCollectionsControl
IN THE NEWS

Control

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
NEWS
January 28, 2014
So, Dan Rodricks actually thinks it's unbelievable that there are people who feel that "you don't expect that kind of thing to happen to you," as he was reportedly told by an 18-year-old worker in the aftermath of the shootings at the Mall in Columbia ( "Expecting the horrible is the American way Jan. 25). Mr. Rodricks reports that he had to ask the worker at the mall, not once, but twice, "Really?" Well, guess what, Dan? Yes, there are those of us who are surprised when such events happen.
Advertisement
NEWS
January 5, 2014
Last week, Gov. Martin O'Malley's administration announced that it had exceeded its goal for enrolling low-income Marylanders in the Medicaid program as part of the health insurance expansion under the Affordable Care Act. In addition to improving the health and well being of 111,000 people who have gotten coverage under the Medicaid expansion, state officials hope the expanded coverage will ultimately help reduce health care costs as the previously uninsured...
NEWS
January 3, 2014
- To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com . Please include your name and contact information.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | January 3, 2014
Local governments are charged with enforcing state regulations limiting polluted runoff from new development, and the state is supposed to check on them. Only state officials acknowledge they aren't doing it. Environmental advocates say the lack of state oversight could lead to lax enforcement on the local level - and put efforts to restore the Chesapeake Bay at risk. Rain washing dirt, fertilizer and other pollutants into storm drains and then waterways is a major source of bay pollution - the only category that has grown despite costly cleanup efforts.
NEWS
January 2, 2014
Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor made a reasonable decision when, on New Year's Eve, she temporarily blocked implementation of the Affordable Care Act's contraception coverage mandate in a case brought by a religious order of nuns that operates homes for the poor and elderly in Catonsville and elsewhere. It certainly doesn't hurt to wait a few days and hear the government's argument for immediate implementation. But the 11th hour drama doesn't change the fact that the contraceptive coverage requirement is good policy, and the mechanism for groups like the Little Sisters of the Poor to avoid violating their religious tenets is reasonable.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | January 2, 2014
Baltimore Police are investigating after drug evidence vanished Thursday from the agency's evidence control unit in police headquarters. Capt. Eric Kowalczyk confirmed that a citizen was in the evidence unit Thursday to pick up property, and drug evidence went "missing. " He would not identify the evidence or elaborate on how much was taken or how the chain of custody was broken. "We are currently conducting a criminal and administrative investigation to see what transpired," Kowalczyk said.
HEALTH
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | January 1, 2014
A Roman Catholic order of nuns who care for the elderly poor was hopeful Wednesday after the Supreme Court temporarily blocked an Obamacare provision that would have required it to authorize birth control coverage for employees starting with the new year. The Obama administration has allowed some religious nonprofits to sidestep the so-called contraception mandate by filing a form that would allow a third-party administrator to provide the coverage at no cost to the organization.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells and Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | December 28, 2013
A group of Catonsville nuns who claimed that the new federal health care law's contraceptive coverage requirement would violate their religious beliefs are actually exempt from the mandate, a U.S. district judge concluded Friday. The Little Sisters of the Poor operates St. Martin's Home in Catonsville and about 30 other homes for the poor and elderly across the country, including in Colorado, where the federal lawsuit was filed on their behalf in September by the Becket Fund for Religious Liberty.
SPORTS
By Jeff Zrebiec and The Baltimore Sun | December 22, 2013
As the New England Patriots were turning the game into a rout with two late defensive touchdowns, wide receiver Torrey Smith sat on an otherwise empty bench, surveying a scene that no Raven could fathom. M&T Bank Stadium was just about empty by then, and the signs of resignation were everywhere. In a game they knew they had to win to control their playoff future, the Ravens hadn't just been beaten by the Patriots. They had been routed, overwhelmed and embarrassed, a 41-7 blowout qualifying as their most lopsided home loss in team history and worst defeat under coach John Harbaugh.
NEWS
By Gerald W. Winegrad | December 15, 2013
Thirty years ago, the governors in Maryland, Virginia and Pennsylvania; the mayor of D.C.; and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency administrator signed the first Chesapeake Bay Agreement, solemnly pledging to stem the flow of pollutants and bring the bay into compliance with the Clean Water Act. As a state senator, I optimistically witnessed this event and thought the job would be done in a decade. But today - after more detailed pledges to reduce nutrients, sediment and toxic chemicals - we are still far from meeting these commitments.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.