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NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,tim.wheeler@baltsun.com | September 24, 2009
A Maryland Transit Administration official said Wednesday that the state plans to check the electronic system controlling Baltimore's subway trains after federal safety officials warned that glitches with a similar control system for Washington's Metro might have caused a fatal crash there in June. Vern Hartsock, MTA's deputy director for engineering and construction, said he expects to meet today with a team of experts in response to a call by the National Transportation Safety Board to examine similar train control systems for problems or weaknesses.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | May 5, 2014
Hackerman House, one of the three buildings that make up the Walters Art Museum , will be closed for about two and a half years beginning July 1, a museum official announced Friday. In addition, galleries housing 19 t h century art on the fourth floor of the Centre Street building will be closed to the public between June 23 and Oct. 25, according to museum spokeswoman Mona M. Rock. It's all part of a long-planned, $5.2 million refurbishment of the museum. Most of the work will involve replacing the 23-year-old fire suppression and climate control systems, Rock said.
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SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,Special to The Sun | February 16, 2008
Mike Trombetta, the top Maryland trainer in percentage a year ago, is scheduled to visit the winner's circle before the sixth race at Laurel Park today for a special presentation acknowledging that achievement. He hopes to make a return trip later in the program. Trombetta will saddle morning-line favorite Control System for the Grade II, $300,000 Barbara Fritchie Handicap, the co-feature of the track's three-stakes Presidents Day weekend, the most lucrative of the winter season in Maryland.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,tim.wheeler@baltsun.com | September 24, 2009
A Maryland Transit Administration official said Wednesday that the state plans to check the electronic system controlling Baltimore's subway trains after federal safety officials warned that glitches with a similar control system for Washington's Metro might have caused a fatal crash there in June. Vern Hartsock, MTA's deputy director for engineering and construction, said he expects to meet today with a team of experts in response to a call by the National Transportation Safety Board to examine similar train control systems for problems or weaknesses.
SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,Special to The Sun | February 17, 2008
In a field of better-known horses and trainers, Golden Dawn and Michael Hushion didn't exactly stand out. But when the $300,000, Grade II Barbara Fritchie Handicap ended at Laurel Park yesterday, everyone knew their names. With an astute ride from Channing Hill, Golden Dawn walloped the competition, beating favored Control System by six lengths and leaving last year's Fritchie champion, Oprah Winney, in her wake. Oprah Winney was eased and finished last among eight starters. The bettors weren't deceived, making Golden Dawn the 4-1 second choice to Control System, who was making her debut over the Laurel strip where she trains.
NEWS
February 6, 1991
The runway collision on Friday in Los Angeles between a commercial airliner and a small commuter plane that left 32 people dead is a clear warning that the air traffic control system of major U.S. airports is dangerously overextended. According to the Federal Aviation Administration's own statistics, near-collisions between planes on the ground climbed almost 50 percent last year, to 267. And the agency still may not have enough experienced controllers to handle heavy traffic at the nation's busiest airports.
BUSINESS
By Robert Little and Robert Little,SUN STAFF | January 13, 2002
The guys at Integral Systems Inc. had a great idea. Instead of controlling satellites with bulky mainframes and mini-computers, like everyone else, they'd fly them with desktop computers. And instead of building custom-made systems each time a bird went into orbit - like everyone else - they'd make one generic system that could fly satellites from any manufacturer, in any orbit, on any mission. Anything. Their control system would be easier to use, cheaper by a factor of 10, and people with satellites would be crazy to buy anything else.
FEATURES
By DAVE BARRY | July 3, 1994
As a frequent flier, I am alarmed about the air traffic control situation.As you probably know, air traffic control is the system set up by the federal government to keep airplanes from crashing any more than is absolutely necessary. This is accomplished via radar. Here's how it works: A thing at the airport sends out radar beams that travel through the atmosphere until they strike an airplane, causing it to shake violently during the meal service. The radar beams then bounce off the plane and travel back the other way until they are detected by the supersensitive ear of the bat, which is thus able to locate the mosquito, eat it, and throw up.No, wait, that is sonar.
NEWS
By Robert Scheer | August 22, 1991
IN A SCENARIO that smacked of spy thrillers, the coup in the Soviet Union raised frightening questions about who was in charge of the codes that could launch almost half of the world's nuclear arsenal.A leading Soviet space scientist and several top American experts contend that the highly centralized and automated Soviet command and control system was at risk durRobertScheering the coup."It's the first time in human history when organizers of a coup could also seize the buttons that control the weapons of mass destruction," said Roald Z. Sagdeyev, the former director of the Soviet space program and a leading Soviet arms expert.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,Staff Writer | March 27, 1993
Russia has signed an agreement with an international group of companies, including a local unit of the Westinghouse Electric Corp., to begin work on an estimated $10 billion program to modernize that country's air traffic control system.Westinghouse is the only U.S. member of the consortium, which includes Thomson-CSF, the world's second-largest electronics company, and JVC Buran, a joint venture of Russian industry groups with Alenia, a leading Italian radar manufacturer.While the three companies have rarely teamed on projects, they are hardly strangers.
NEWS
By Keiffer J. Mitchell Jr | September 8, 2008
The city-state schools partnership that was created in 1997 came with much fanfare about increased funding, increased accountability and rising test scores. Indeed, there has been increased funding and a moderate rise in test scores. However, the biggest frustration to the partnership is accountability. Mayor Sheila Dixon has floated the idea of calling for mayoral control of the Baltimore schools. This is long overdue; I advocated for such a change in a Sun op-ed more than a year ago. However, if Mayor Dixon is serious, before she calls for commissions, task forces or study groups, she must be committed to certain principles in order to gain the support of lawmakers, parents, teachers, businesses and citizens.
SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,Special to The Sun | February 17, 2008
In a field of better-known horses and trainers, Golden Dawn and Michael Hushion didn't exactly stand out. But when the $300,000, Grade II Barbara Fritchie Handicap ended at Laurel Park yesterday, everyone knew their names. With an astute ride from Channing Hill, Golden Dawn walloped the competition, beating favored Control System by six lengths and leaving last year's Fritchie champion, Oprah Winney, in her wake. Oprah Winney was eased and finished last among eight starters. The bettors weren't deceived, making Golden Dawn the 4-1 second choice to Control System, who was making her debut over the Laurel strip where she trains.
SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,Special to The Sun | February 16, 2008
Mike Trombetta, the top Maryland trainer in percentage a year ago, is scheduled to visit the winner's circle before the sixth race at Laurel Park today for a special presentation acknowledging that achievement. He hopes to make a return trip later in the program. Trombetta will saddle morning-line favorite Control System for the Grade II, $300,000 Barbara Fritchie Handicap, the co-feature of the track's three-stakes Presidents Day weekend, the most lucrative of the winter season in Maryland.
BUSINESS
By Robert Little and Robert Little,SUN STAFF | January 13, 2002
The guys at Integral Systems Inc. had a great idea. Instead of controlling satellites with bulky mainframes and mini-computers, like everyone else, they'd fly them with desktop computers. And instead of building custom-made systems each time a bird went into orbit - like everyone else - they'd make one generic system that could fly satellites from any manufacturer, in any orbit, on any mission. Anything. Their control system would be easier to use, cheaper by a factor of 10, and people with satellites would be crazy to buy anything else.
NEWS
June 11, 2001
AIR PASSENGER discontent is sky high. So is the number of passengers and scheduled flights - and the number of flights delayed or canceled. Thankfully, the Federal Aviation Administration has unveiled a $12 billion modernization plan to handle a 30 percent increase in U.S. air traffic over 10 years. Yet all air travelers can hope is that things won't get any worse. Improvements will focus on maintaining safety and managing delays. Note the italicized words. At best, there would be a modest increase in passenger safety and efficiency as the nation's air traffic system is upgraded.
NEWS
October 20, 2000
Robert Nelson, By TaNoah Morgan SUN STAFF One of two pit bulls accused of attacking a 14-year-old Millersville girl over the summer will be returned to its owner, but the other should be killed, a county police captain has decided - partly overturning an Animal Control Commission recommendation. Capt. Thomas A. Suit, who oversees Anne Arundel County Animal Control, issued a destruction order for Kane, a dog alleged to have injured three other people in earlier incidents. In taking the action, Suit sided with Animal Control Administrator Tahira S. Thomas, who wanted Kane destroyed but whose decision had been opposed by the commission.
NEWS
October 20, 2000
Robert Nelson, By TaNoah Morgan SUN STAFF One of two pit bulls accused of attacking a 14-year-old Millersville girl over the summer will be returned to its owner, but the other should be killed, a county police captain has decided - partly overturning an Animal Control Commission recommendation. Capt. Thomas A. Suit, who oversees Anne Arundel County Animal Control, issued a destruction order for Kane, a dog alleged to have injured three other people in earlier incidents. In taking the action, Suit sided with Animal Control Administrator Tahira S. Thomas, who wanted Kane destroyed but whose decision had been opposed by the commission.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,Staff Writer | February 28, 1992
As the people at the local Westinghouse division see it, there's not a big difference in keeping track of tanks on the battlefield and MTA buses making their way around the city.Westinghouse Electronic Systems Group in Linthicum has announced the sale to Milwaukee County, for $8.4 million, of a newmass transit vehicle management system that taps into the technology used in the Persian Gulf war last year.The system includes a communication network that, using a global positioning satellite, allows a dispatcher to determine the location, to within about 50 yards, of all buses in his system at all times.
BUSINESS
By Amanda J. Crawford and By Amanda J. Crawford,SUN STAFF | May 9, 2000
A unit of Lockheed Martin Corp. signed a 10-year partnership agreement yesterday with Airways New Zealand to modernize the country's air traffic control system and pursue air management contracts in other regions. Lockheed Martin Air Traffic Management, the Rockville-based provider of air traffic control systems, will replace the New Zealand air traffic control system, including three area control centers and 17 tower systems, with its SkyLine technology. Terms of the deal were not disclosed.
BUSINESS
By Kristine Henry and Kristine Henry,SUN STAFF | April 28, 2000
Seeking cash to help pare long-term debt of nearly $12 billion, Lockheed Martin Corp. said yesterday that it will sell its control systems subsidiary to BAE Systems North America Inc. for $510 million in cash. The deal is part of an overall streamlining strategy Bethesda-based Lockheed announced in September, when it said it would sell eight of its subsidiaries, bringing in an estimated $1.5 billion. Lockheed Martin Control Systems, located in Johnson City, N.Y., and Fort Wayne, Ind., makes electronic controls for the commercial and military markets, including aircraft, space and ground transportation systems.
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