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Control Room

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By MILTON KENT | March 17, 1995
With 13.1 seconds left in overtime of yesterday's first-round NCAA tournament game between St. Louis and Minnesota, the CBS control room is whipped into a state of organized frenzy.In the front row of the booth, Bob Fishman, CBS' college basketball director, and Bob Dekas, the producer, each are flailing their hands, while barking orders to any and everyone who will listen.For the first time all day, there are potentially dramatic moments coming from the bank of monitors in this cold, darkened room in a tractor-trailer wedged under the bowels of the Baltimore Arena.
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Editorial from The Aegis | March 29, 2012
Since 1989, the opening credits to "The Simpsons," the longest running animated series on TV, has featured a short bit of animations showing the buffoon patriarch Homer sacked out at his post in the control room at a nuclear power plant. It's probably no coincidence that when the show was first going into production, the Peach Bottom Atomic Power Station was in the national spotlight for being shut down in the aftermath of U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission inspectors finding a real-life nuclear operator asleep at his post in the control room.
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | June 18, 2004
Set just before and during the field-combat phase of the Iraq war, Control Room produces 84 minutes of gripping footage about the controversial Qatar-based Al-Jazeera Satellite Channel, which transmits news to 40 million Arabs. But the movie offers neither lucid analyses of the channel nor probing portraits of its journalists. Following the custom of cinema-verite documentary-makers who keep titles and narration to a minimum, the film's Egyptian-born director, Jehane Noujaim, a graduate of Harvard's Visual Studies department and MTV's documentary division, gives this factual picture the tension and esprit of a feature like Broadcast News.
NEWS
By SUSAN GVOZDAS and SUSAN GVOZDAS,Special to The Sun | February 24, 2008
It's 9 a.m. Tuesday and TV weatherman Jacob Facemire is looking over the forecast: cloudy and cold. He takes note of the high and low temperatures and picks out a drawing of clouds on white poster board. Ten minutes later, the anchors of the WOES-TV morning show introduce him. He holds up the poster and delivers the forecast to his audience of 375 students at OES, or Odenton Elementary School. Jacob, 10, is part of the rotating fifth-grade classes that get to host the five-minute broadcast of announcements.
SPORTS
By Phil Jackman | February 28, 1992
Camera 1 is play-by-play, an overview. Camera 2 hones in on the action around the puck. Cameras 3 and 4 are hand-held at each end of the arena. Camera 5 waits for assignment. Wait, there's more.Video Tape Recorder A records the hand-helds, B does the reverse angle from center ice at the top of the building and VTR 820 records the tight angle play of Camera 2. All this bric-a-brac is buzzing, whirring and delivering its pictures to a control board operated by five people playing with dials, switches, buttons and bows while keeping a check on various meters and the Dow Jones closing average.
NEWS
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,SUN STAFF | February 1, 2003
The Maryland Transit Administration blamed lax control room employees yesterday for allowing a subway train to go down a section of track that was supposed to be closed, leading to a collision with a maintenance truck Sunday that sent 11 people to hospitals with minor injuries. The employees failed to answer the maintenance crew's request to leave the tunnel where it was working, then failed to send a signal to the train operator to use a different track, said MTA spokeswoman Suzanne Bond.
SPORTS
By MILTON KENT | March 15, 1996
NEW YORK -- Like the groundhog, Rick Gentile, temporarily the most important man in America, only occasionally poked his head out of the mini-control room off to the side of Studio 43 at the CBS Broadcast Center here yesterday.And like the furry animal whose presence indicates an end to winter, the appearance of Gentile, with his curly salt-and-pepper hair stuffed inside a Final Four cap, meant all was well with CBS' NCAA tournament coverage."We had a good day. We just didn't have any buzzer-beaters," said Gentile, CBS Sports senior vice president of production, and the man who heads the team that decides when the Connecticut-Colgate blowout your local station has been assigned becomes the Stanford-Bradley game.
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Editorial from The Aegis | March 29, 2012
Since 1989, the opening credits to "The Simpsons," the longest running animated series on TV, has featured a short bit of animations showing the buffoon patriarch Homer sacked out at his post in the control room at a nuclear power plant. It's probably no coincidence that when the show was first going into production, the Peach Bottom Atomic Power Station was in the national spotlight for being shut down in the aftermath of U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission inspectors finding a real-life nuclear operator asleep at his post in the control room.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Del Quentin Wilber and Michael Dresser and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | June 16, 1999
Prison officials pointed their fingers at Bell Atlantic yesterday for the failure of four alarms to sound an alert to nearby communities when two inmates escaped last month from Maryland Correctional Institution in Jessup.Richard Rosenblatt, director of neighboring Patuxent Institution, told legislators that a phone company employee diverted wires from the Jessup complex to the remote alarms while doing maintenance work. He said company representatives had repeatedly assured state officials that such a failure would not occur.
NEWS
By SUSAN GVOZDAS and SUSAN GVOZDAS,Special to The Sun | February 24, 2008
It's 9 a.m. Tuesday and TV weatherman Jacob Facemire is looking over the forecast: cloudy and cold. He takes note of the high and low temperatures and picks out a drawing of clouds on white poster board. Ten minutes later, the anchors of the WOES-TV morning show introduce him. He holds up the poster and delivers the forecast to his audience of 375 students at OES, or Odenton Elementary School. Jacob, 10, is part of the rotating fifth-grade classes that get to host the five-minute broadcast of announcements.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | August 10, 2005
In the minutes before the shuttle Discovery landed at a California air base, just before the handshakes and sighs of relief, an unaccustomed silence descended on the Flight Dynamics control room at Goddard Space Flight Center. Technicians and engineers who had spent more than two years working on the shuttle's tracking and communication systems stopped chatting and peered up at large-screen TV screens where Discovery hurtled toward Edwards Air Force Base in a steep glide, approaching a dimly lit runway at 200 mph. The workers had spent most of the early morning yesterday huddled over computer screens filled with numbers and charts, calmly collecting reams of data beamed from the shuttle to an array of satellites and transmitting it to NASA's mission control center in Houston.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | July 27, 2005
GREENBELT - It happened again. A NASA space shuttle lifted off from Cape Canaveral yesterday morning, and tears pooled in Bruce Schmeck's eyes. "Every time we fly, I well up," confessed Schmeck, 52, a Baltimore native and Honeywell Technology Solutions employee who manages shuttle communications for the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt. He wasn't the only one caught up in the emotion of yesterday's "return to flight." As workers directly involved in the launch focused on their monitors, others crowded a hallway to peer through the control room windows of the Flight Dynamics Facility, where engineers track the shuttle and make sure communications antennas around the world stay pointed at it. The Goddard employees cheered, applauded and heaved a collective sigh of relief as the shuttle Discovery roared into orbit.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | August 4, 2004
As he watched years of sweat and effort disappear into the night sky atop a trail of fire almost 800 miles away, Karl Fielhauer shouted at his video screen. "C'mon baby, burn!" he yelled as Messenger, the first mission to the planet Mercury in 31 years. blasted off from Cape Canaveral in Florida. The on-time liftoff of NASA's $426 million Messenger spacecraft early yesterday was greeted by whoops and cheers from Fielhauer -- the mission's lead radio engineer -- and dozens of colleagues in the mission control center at Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Lab near Laurel.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | June 18, 2004
Set just before and during the field-combat phase of the Iraq war, Control Room produces 84 minutes of gripping footage about the controversial Qatar-based Al-Jazeera Satellite Channel, which transmits news to 40 million Arabs. But the movie offers neither lucid analyses of the channel nor probing portraits of its journalists. Following the custom of cinema-verite documentary-makers who keep titles and narration to a minimum, the film's Egyptian-born director, Jehane Noujaim, a graduate of Harvard's Visual Studies department and MTV's documentary division, gives this factual picture the tension and esprit of a feature like Broadcast News.
FEATURES
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN STAFF | June 16, 2004
In the world of media, there is little that angers the Bush administration more than the influence of Al-Jazeera - the Qatar-based satellite television channel that features news reports drawing a broad Arab audience, often depicting Americans as the heavy. Just last week, the United States did not invite the Emir of Qatar to Georgia for a summit of major world leaders as a way of signaling displeasure with Al-Jazeera's coverage. "People have suggested that it would be a good thing if the reporting were accurate on Al-Jazeera, and if it were not slanted in ways that appears to be, at times, just purely inaccurate," National Security Adviser Condoleezza Rice explained to reporters.
NEWS
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,SUN STAFF | February 1, 2003
The Maryland Transit Administration blamed lax control room employees yesterday for allowing a subway train to go down a section of track that was supposed to be closed, leading to a collision with a maintenance truck Sunday that sent 11 people to hospitals with minor injuries. The employees failed to answer the maintenance crew's request to leave the tunnel where it was working, then failed to send a signal to the train operator to use a different track, said MTA spokeswoman Suzanne Bond.
NEWS
By LISA RESPERS and LISA RESPERS,SUN STAFF | November 19, 1997
It straddles two counties, a mountain of steel and concrete nearly a mile long and more than 100 feet high, blending into the Susquehanna River as it transforms the river's flow into electricity.The exterior of the Conowingo Hydroelectric Station and Dam, nearly 70 years old, is an integral part of the landscape of Harford and Cecil counties. It draws anglers and bird-watchers to its teeming reservoir and tourists to the torrent that spills below the structure.But, deep inside, the dam has a secret life of its own.From "Turbine Hall," where 11 huge turbines hum with the sound of churning water wheels, to the dank inspection tunnel below a 90-foot spillway, workers scurry behind a wall of water.
SPORTS
By MILTON KENT | March 13, 1995
If you think the drama of NCAA tournament games is heart-stopping for players, coaches and short-term investors, try being a network executive who doesn't know whether his network will be on the air when the commercial ends.That's the situation that faced Rick Gentile, CBS Sports senior vice president of production a couple of years ago, just after the network bought up access to all 63 games, including the first-round contests.Gentile, who will serve as the tournament's executive producer when it opens Thursday afternoon, was sitting in a New York control room, moving parts of the country from the end of one game to another in a procedure called "flexing."
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | July 14, 2002
When Mayor Martin O'Malley launched his high-tech Citistat program two years ago, many grumbled it was nothing more than a public relations ploy: a bunch of computers flashing data about city services on jumbo screens in City Hall. But the firing of city parks director Marvin F. Billups Jr. on July 3 showed how the biweekly Citistat data review sessions have become a driving force in O'Malley's administration. The action also demonstrated how hard the mayor can come down on those who don't produce the numbers and results he wants.
NEWS
By Paul Reid and Paul Reid,COX NEWS SERVICE | August 17, 2000
WEST PALM BEACH, Fla. - From the bottom of the ladder, looking up, the circle of sky beyond the open hatch looks pretty small. Far away, and very small. Then a sailor pulls down on the hatch and dogs it tight. Drops of water fall past steel ladders and twisting cables and onto the deck, where they glisten in the dim red light of the control room. A voice nearby, a sailor: "It's quiet, no?" Yes, it's quiet on board the USS Hampton. During the Cold War, nuclear submarines were shrouded in quiet and secrecy, almost everything about them a mystery.
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