Advertisement
HomeCollectionsControl Pills
IN THE NEWS

Control Pills

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,sun reporter | October 25, 2006
What had been -- up to now -- a placid contest for a key state Senate seat in Howard County erupted in recriminations this week when incumbent Republican Sen. Sandra B. Schrader accused Democrats of smearing her with misleading charges on the issue of birth control. Standing on a bench before a group of about 50 cheering supporters in front of the county office building in Ellicott City on Monday, Schrader blamed County Executive James N. Robey, her Democratic opponent, for a descent into what she called "gutter politics."
Advertisement
FEATURES
By SUSAN REIMER | June 14, 2005
MY COLLEGE friends and I found out through the grapevine about a doctor in town who would prescribe birth control pills. One after another, we climbed the stairs to his dusty and dimly lit second-floor office and endured a humiliating pelvic exam in exchange for a prescription for a packet of pills. It was 1970, and it was illegal. We were unmarried, and unmarried women could not legally receive birth control information or products until 1972. We were just 18 or 19 years old, and teenagers could not legally receive birth control information or products until 1977.
NEWS
December 14, 1990
For the first time in three decades, American women have access to a new, effective birth control option offering greater control over their reproductive lives and the possibility of quelling the furor over abortion. Norplant, a surgical implant approved by the Food and Drug Administration this week, is in essence a new way of introducing pregnancy-preventing hormones into a woman's system. Its effectiveness and longevity make it far superior to existing methods.A small fan-like arrangement of soft tubes implanted under a woman's skin protects against pregnancy for five years and can be easily removed once a woman decides to conceive.
NEWS
By Tom Horton and Tom Horton,SUN STAFF | December 5, 2003
LAWYER, WRITER, bartender, Zen Buddhist, environmentalist and fierce defender of bay watermen - Mary Madison's one of the more interesting people to emerge on the Chesapeake scene. She's editor of the Waterman's Gazette, the monthly newspaper published in Annapolis by the Maryland Watermen's Association, which represents the state's commercial crabbers, fishermen and oystermen. I've read the Gazette for more than 20 years, but often I would spend about a minute doing it. Since Madison took over a few years ago, that's changed.
FEATURES
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon, Ph.D. and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon, Ph.D.,SPECIAL TO THE SUN King Features Syndicate | August 26, 1997
What can you tell us about St. John's wort? My wife saw a TV show that said it is being used in Europe to treat depression.I am currently on Zoloft, and have taken Prozac in the past. These drugs have helped, but I have had trouble with side effects, especially insomnia and sexual complications. I would very much like to get off Zoloft, though of course I will continue to see my doctor regularly.If I should need treatment in the future, I would be interested in trying a more natural alternative.
FEATURES
By M.K. Guzda and M.K. Guzda,The Evening Sun | August 13, 1991
REGINA SMITH wanted her tubes tied.She was 17 and had just given birth to her daughter, Crystal.She didn't want another unplanned pregnancy, but her doctors told her that, as a rule, they don't sterilize teen-agers.After her daughter was born 18 months ago, the South Baltimore woman used no birth control method, she says. "I won't take the pills," she says adamantly, shaking her head while hoisting baby Crystal on her hip. "They're a pain and a hassle to remember every day."The pain and hassle were reduced last week, when, in a 20-minute procedure, a midwife inserted into Regina Smith's upper arm a birth control implant lasting five years.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,Washington Bureau of The Sun | July 25, 1991
WASHINGTON -- The anti-abortion Crisis Pregnancy Centers in Baltimore and four other Maryland locations are providing faulty information about abortion and birth control and are deceiving women into thinking they offer abortion services, a complaint to the state attorney general's office alleged yesterday."
NEWS
February 13, 1993
Norplant and African AmericansThe recent public discussion of the contraceptive Norplant is very distressing.As a female obstetrician/gynecologist who has Norplant and directs a family planning clinic, I am distressed at the chorus of men attempting to deny women the power to make an informed decision as to whether to use a contraceptive.Throughout history -- whether it be wife-burning, stoning women for adultery, female genital mutilation or fundamentalistpatriarchy, men, often under the self-assumed mantle of religion, seek to control women's lives.
NEWS
March 6, 2012
Maybe it's time we change the name of the birth control pill. What Rush Limbaugh doesn't understand is that women are not always about men. The so-called "pill" has been out for over 50 years now, and we aren't going to give it up. It changed our lives. We are in control, and it's not always about not getting pregnant. It really should be called "the regulator," or perhaps the "health pill. " There are many benefits for going on this course of medicine. We can control our periods (something men don't understand)
FEATURES
By JOE GRAEDON AND TERESA GRAEDON and JOE GRAEDON AND TERESA GRAEDON,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 10, 1995
When I read your column about the woman who got pregnant on birth-control pills, I was gratified to see that this had happened to someone else besides me.I had been on birth-control pills for five years and went to my dentist for tooth pain. He gave me penicillin VK for two weeks.After I had finished the antibiotic, a friend told me I should take a pregnancy test. It came back positive, even though I had taken my pill regularly. I was devastated. My husband and I hadn't planned to have any more kids.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.