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By Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe and Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe,Special to The Sun | January 10, 1995
Q: I have been on birth control pills for almost two years, since I was 15. Should I go off them for a while to make sure my system is OK?A: When birth control pills first became available, doctors suggested that women stop taking them periodically to give their bodies a rest and, as your question suggests, make sure everything is OK. Now that we have much more experience with these pills and know more about how they work and how they affect a teen-ager's body,...
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NEWS
Susan Reimer | October 12, 2014
Author Jonathan Eig recalls hearing a rabbi say in a sermon that The Pill was the most important invention of the 20th century and scoffing at that declaration. He could think of half a dozen inventions more important. And besides, who invented it? If The Pill was so important, why wasn't there an Alexander Graham Bell or a Henry Ford story to go with it? Mr. Eig has now written that story. A rollicking, super-secret race against time, the Catholic Church and the federal government run by a disenfranchised scientist, a Catholic gynecologist women instinctively trusted, a woman who championed the pleasure of sex for women and her immensely wealthy friend.
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NEWS
By New York Times | August 21, 1991
There has been a dramatic jump in the number of women using birth control pills, with more women staying on the pill longer and an increasing number remaining on the pill into their 40s, a new study has found.Among the other surprising findings in the study, a large survey regarding the contraceptive choices of American women, was that those who rely on intrauterine devices, which can be difficult to obtain in the United States, report the highest level of satisfaction of any contraceptive users.
NEWS
March 6, 2012
Maybe it's time we change the name of the birth control pill. What Rush Limbaugh doesn't understand is that women are not always about men. The so-called "pill" has been out for over 50 years now, and we aren't going to give it up. It changed our lives. We are in control, and it's not always about not getting pregnant. It really should be called "the regulator," or perhaps the "health pill. " There are many benefits for going on this course of medicine. We can control our periods (something men don't understand)
NEWS
By SHARI ROAN and SHARI ROAN,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 14, 2006
This is turning out to be a pivotal year in birth control. In the past six months, the Food and Drug Administration has approved an oral contraceptive that eliminates a monthly menstrual period, and can prevent mood swings and other side effects. It also has approved two others that feature shorter periods. And soon it's expected to sign off on a yearlong oral contraceptive and a simpler version of a contraceptive implant. Of course, there's no long-term data on the new methods - and they aren't for everyone - but doctors consider this new generation of birth control to be less risky and more sophisticated than the decades-old predecessors.
NEWS
By Thomas H. Maugh II and Thomas H. Maugh II,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 21, 2004
Birth control pills reduce the incidence of heart attacks and other forms of cardiovascular disease and lower the incidence of certain types of cancer, including ovarian and endometrial cancer, researchers said yesterday. A team from Wayne State University in Detroit used the huge volume of data available for 162,000 women in the Women's Health Initiative - the same study that showed that hormone replacement therapy was much riskier than previously believed - to provide the most definitive word yet on the safety of "the pill."
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,King Features Syndicate | October 26, 2003
The continuing bad news about hormone replacement therapy has me upset. Can you clear up another question for me? The news has focused on the dangers of estrogen plus progestin for older women. What about the danger to younger women taking the same hormones as birth control pills? Are our daughters at risk from using birth control pills that contain estrogen and progestin? Most birth control pills are combinations of estrogen and progestin, not that different from postmenopausal hormone replacement therapy (HRT)
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | October 8, 1992
In a discovery that could reshape the debate over the French abortion pill, RU486, researchers have found it can enable women to avoid abortions by serving as a highly effective morning-after pill.In a new study, Dr. Anna Glasier and her colleagues at the University of Edinburgh gave RU486 or a standard pregnancy-preventing regimen of high doses of birth control pills to 800 women who requested emergency help.Both treatments prevented pregnancy in women who had had unprotected sexual intercourse in the preceding 72 hours, but RU486 caused far less nausea and vomiting, the study found.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 11, 2000
Women who took birth control pills before 1975 and whose mothers or sisters had breast cancer have a substantially increased risk of developing the disease and should take special care to have regular mammograms and breast exams, researchers are reporting. The warning applies only to women with a family history of breast cancer and not to the general population, where studies have shown a slight increase in breast cancer risk from birth control pills, which disappears 10 years after use of the pills is stopped.
NEWS
By From staff reports | March 7, 1998
Senate approves bill on birth control pillsThe Maryland Senate approved a bill yesterday that would end the practice of treating birth control pills differently from other prescriptions.The measure, passed 31-14, would require health insurers to include contraceptive drugs and devices in their prescription plans. The amended version permits religious organizations to request that their insurer exclude such coverage.Women's groups and medical organizations promoted the bill as gender equity, saying national studies show women of reproductive age spend 68 percent more on out-of-pocket health costs than men. But insurance representatives argued the benefit would drive up the cost of health care.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,Sun reporter | February 1, 2008
Dr. Edward F. Lewison, an internationally recognized surgeon and authority on breast cancer who was a founder and former chief of the Johns Hopkins Hospital's Breast Clinic, died Monday of heart failure at his home in the Winthrop House condominiums on North Charles Street. He was 94. "Ed was a model practicing surgeon who had a special interest in breast cancer. He was always knowledgeable in new developments and treatments," said Dr. Richard S. Ross, former dean of the Hopkins School of Medicine.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon | December 29, 2006
I want to let you know that hormone replacement therapy (HRT) can have very serious side effects. Between 1996 and 1998, I took HRT under the advisement of my obstetrician/gynecologist. She told me that the benefits of taking HRT outweighed the risks and that it would protect my heart. The dose I took was very low. In May 1998, I drove myself to the emergency room, where I was diagnosed with deep vein thrombosis (blood clots from my calf to my groin) and also a number of blood clots in my lungs.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,sun reporter | October 25, 2006
What had been -- up to now -- a placid contest for a key state Senate seat in Howard County erupted in recriminations this week when incumbent Republican Sen. Sandra B. Schrader accused Democrats of smearing her with misleading charges on the issue of birth control. Standing on a bench before a group of about 50 cheering supporters in front of the county office building in Ellicott City on Monday, Schrader blamed County Executive James N. Robey, her Democratic opponent, for a descent into what she called "gutter politics."
NEWS
By SHARI ROAN and SHARI ROAN,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 14, 2006
This is turning out to be a pivotal year in birth control. In the past six months, the Food and Drug Administration has approved an oral contraceptive that eliminates a monthly menstrual period, and can prevent mood swings and other side effects. It also has approved two others that feature shorter periods. And soon it's expected to sign off on a yearlong oral contraceptive and a simpler version of a contraceptive implant. Of course, there's no long-term data on the new methods - and they aren't for everyone - but doctors consider this new generation of birth control to be less risky and more sophisticated than the decades-old predecessors.
NEWS
By R. ALONSO-ZALDIVAR and R. ALONSO-ZALDIVAR,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 18, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Women using the increasingly popular birth control patch could face double the risk of blood clots as women taking contraceptive pills, but more investigation is needed to see whether those preliminary findings are valid, federal regulators said yesterday. "We're not sure what this means clinically, but it's information that people need to know about," said Dr. Daniel Shames, head of the Food and Drug Administration division that evaluates contraceptives. "At this time, we do not plan on taking any specific regulatory action based on these preliminary results."
FEATURES
By SUSAN REIMER | June 14, 2005
MY COLLEGE friends and I found out through the grapevine about a doctor in town who would prescribe birth control pills. One after another, we climbed the stairs to his dusty and dimly lit second-floor office and endured a humiliating pelvic exam in exchange for a prescription for a packet of pills. It was 1970, and it was illegal. We were unmarried, and unmarried women could not legally receive birth control information or products until 1972. We were just 18 or 19 years old, and teenagers could not legally receive birth control information or products until 1977.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,SUN STAFF | July 1, 2001
Q. Do sunscreen products lose their effectiveness over time? I have had some sunscreens in my golf bag, in the trunk of my car or in a locker for a couple of years and wonder if they can still protect my skin. A. Sunscreens can eventually lose effectiveness, so check the container for an expiration date. Don't worry about your sunscreen having been exposed to heat, though. Consumer Reports tested sunscreens to simulate leaving them in a hot car during the summer. They remained effective despite exposure to temperatures of 160 degrees for more than five hours a day for two months.
NEWS
By Judy Peres and Judy Peres,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | November 7, 2004
ATLANTA - Scientists studying female sexuality have offered a possible biological explanation for the common complaint that oral contraceptive pills, used by one in four U.S. women at any given time, can dampen desire. Although the research is preliminary, two small studies presented here found that the pill reduces testosterone levels, which in turn may contribute to loss of libido. One researcher said the problem persists for some women even after they stop taking the pill. Low libido is the most frequent sexual complaint among U.S. women.
NEWS
By Judy Peres and Judy Peres,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | November 7, 2004
ATLANTA - Scientists studying female sexuality have offered a possible biological explanation for the common complaint that oral contraceptive pills, used by one in four U.S. women at any given time, can dampen desire. Although the research is preliminary, two small studies presented here found that the pill reduces testosterone levels, which in turn may contribute to loss of libido. One researcher said the problem persists for some women even after they stop taking the pill. Low libido is the most frequent sexual complaint among U.S. women.
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