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By David L. Greene and David L. Greene,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 5, 2002
WASHINGTON - President Bush has been crisscrossing the country at a frenzied pace to help Republicans in tight election races. Control of Congress hangs in the balance. If Republicans were to command both the House and Senate, Bush's agenda would stand a better chance of passage. Truth be told, though, Bush should not necessarily run victory laps if Republicans win big in the elections today. Some analysts say that, paradoxically, Bush's prospects for re-election would strengthen if Democrats - and not Republicans - control both chambers of Congress.
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NEWS
By PAUL WEST and PAUL WEST,WASHINGTON BUREAU CHIEF | December 2, 2007
WASHINGTON // Presidential races are intensifying on both sides, and the story lines are choice: Will Hillary hold off Barack? Can a surging Mike Huckabee go all the way? Will John McCain, left for dead a few months ago, stage a miracle comeback in New Hampshire? The campaign is playing out against a backdrop of unusually consequential issues and themes: an unpopular war, simmering fears of another terrorist strike, a visceral backlash against illegal immigrants, disgust with Washington gridlock, and a strong desire for change.
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NEWS
February 17, 2007
CHARLES NORWOOD JR., 65 Ga. congressman Rep. Charles Norwood Jr., a blunt-spoken Republican who sold his dental practice and ran for Congress at age 52, died Tuesday at his home in Augusta, Ga., after battling cancer and lung disease. The House interrupted debate on an Iraq war resolution for two moments of silence in his honor. A feisty, tobacco-chewing conservative who loved to hunt and railed against government bureaucracy, Norwood was part of the Republican wave that took control of Congress in 1994.
NEWS
March 9, 2007
The proposal by the Democratic leaders of the House of Representatives to set a timeline for bringing U.S. troops home from Iraq - one that would probably extend well into next year - contains a certain amount of common sense and an excess of caution. That's understandable, but disappointing. The Democrats are clearly nervous about simply pulling the plug on the war, in all likelihood unleashing a very ugly wave of heightened violence in Iraq and perhaps beyond - and in all certainty setting themselves up to take more of the blame than they deserve for the whole misbegotten enterprise having gone from bad to worse.
NEWS
September 15, 2002
Several paragraphs about endorsements from organized labor received by C.A. Dutch Ruppersberger, the Democratic nominee for the 2nd Congressional District, were omitted from an article in yesterday's editions. Among those endorsing Ruppersberger are the state and local branches of the AFL-CIO, the International Association of Firefighters, United Auto Workers, United Food and Commercial Workers, United Mineworkers of America and United Steelworkers of America. Ken Allen, president of the Baltimore County Supervisory, Management and Confidential Employees, said he believes union members will support Ruppersberger because the race could help Democrats regain control of Congress, which he said would be better for unions.
NEWS
October 18, 1996
WITH THE presidential debates now part of the history of the 1996 campaign, attention is bound to focus in the 19 days remaining on the battle for control of Congress. Republican challenger Bob Dole was gritty and determined in his last face-to-face encounter with an elusive President Clinton, but he remains at a distinct disadvantage in all the major opinion polls.Mr. Dole has to hope for the breakthrough that, so far, has never come: Perhaps hard evidence that Indonesian political contributions to the Democratic Party influenced U.S policy toward the Suharto regime.
NEWS
March 9, 2007
The proposal by the Democratic leaders of the House of Representatives to set a timeline for bringing U.S. troops home from Iraq - one that would probably extend well into next year - contains a certain amount of common sense and an excess of caution. That's understandable, but disappointing. The Democrats are clearly nervous about simply pulling the plug on the war, in all likelihood unleashing a very ugly wave of heightened violence in Iraq and perhaps beyond - and in all certainty setting themselves up to take more of the blame than they deserve for the whole misbegotten enterprise having gone from bad to worse.
NEWS
October 23, 1990
The headline on the full page advertisement on Page 11A of The Sun Monday read: "I'M MAD AS HELL AND I'M NOT GOING TO TAKE IT ANYMORE!" It was placed by Jack Gargan of Tampa, Fla. It has appeared or will appear in 132 newspapers, according to Mr. Gargan. His goal is to get people to "rise up and and vote every incumbent senator and congressman out of office!"A recent Gallup Poll showed a mere 24 percent of the American people have confidence in Congress. About half the people in another Gallup Poll said they were going to vote against the incumbents in their state and district.
NEWS
April 14, 1996
WHAT IS GRIDLOCK to some voters is the checks and balance system to others. Traditionally Americans have looked to Congress to curb an excess of power in the presidency. But this year, if a New York Times/CBS poll is reasonably accurate, the pressure goes the other way.Working in President Clinton's favor is the public's supposed wariness about turning both the White House and the Congress over to the Republicans for the first time since Dwight D. Eisenhower's 1952 victory. With voters blaming Speaker Newt Gingrich and the Republican Congress for two government shutdowns, the GOP in this post-primary season is at its lowest point in voter esteem in 12 years.
BUSINESS
By John E. Woodruff | December 4, 1994
Generations of lore holds that Republicans are good for financial markets, but the Dow Jones industrial average nose-dived last month after the GOP won control of both houses of Congress for the first time in decades. Analysts began to suggest for the first time that the market was beginning to look ahead to the next recession, and some said it could begin by the end of 1995.Is it time to wonder about the next recession? Can the Fed manage the ever-elusive "soft landing" when the current growth cycle runs out of steam?
NEWS
February 17, 2007
CHARLES NORWOOD JR., 65 Ga. congressman Rep. Charles Norwood Jr., a blunt-spoken Republican who sold his dental practice and ran for Congress at age 52, died Tuesday at his home in Augusta, Ga., after battling cancer and lung disease. The House interrupted debate on an Iraq war resolution for two moments of silence in his honor. A feisty, tobacco-chewing conservative who loved to hunt and railed against government bureaucracy, Norwood was part of the Republican wave that took control of Congress in 1994.
NEWS
By Ronald Brownstein and Ronald Brownstein,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 7, 2006
WASHINGTON -- The war in Iraq continued to dominate the battle for control of Congress yesterday, as President Bush and Democratic leaders launched their final appeals in a midterm election that could go down as the most expensive and one of the nastiest ever. With a flurry of late national surveys differing on whether Republicans might be reducing the Democratic advantage, leading Democrats urged Americans to demand a new direction in Iraq by ousting the GOP majorities in the House and Senate.
NEWS
By David L. Greene and David L. Greene,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 5, 2002
WASHINGTON - President Bush has been crisscrossing the country at a frenzied pace to help Republicans in tight election races. Control of Congress hangs in the balance. If Republicans were to command both the House and Senate, Bush's agenda would stand a better chance of passage. Truth be told, though, Bush should not necessarily run victory laps if Republicans win big in the elections today. Some analysts say that, paradoxically, Bush's prospects for re-election would strengthen if Democrats - and not Republicans - control both chambers of Congress.
NEWS
September 15, 2002
Several paragraphs about endorsements from organized labor received by C.A. Dutch Ruppersberger, the Democratic nominee for the 2nd Congressional District, were omitted from an article in yesterday's editions. Among those endorsing Ruppersberger are the state and local branches of the AFL-CIO, the International Association of Firefighters, United Auto Workers, United Food and Commercial Workers, United Mineworkers of America and United Steelworkers of America. Ken Allen, president of the Baltimore County Supervisory, Management and Confidential Employees, said he believes union members will support Ruppersberger because the race could help Democrats regain control of Congress, which he said would be better for unions.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | September 4, 2002
MILFORD, N.H. -- This year's Labor Day celebrations once again spotlighted approaching congressional elections, as candidates here and around the country intensified their efforts in traditional parades, picnics and speeches. With the first anniversary of the terrorist attacks just around the corner, the patriotic spirit was particularly evident in towns like this one. Marchers donned Revolutionary and Civil War garb, and in nearby Salem one politician even unctuously dedicated his self-serving campaigning to the victims of 9/11.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,SUN STAFF | May 6, 2002
Although she has not publicly committed to running for Congress, former Rep. Helen Delich Bentley has asked for and received guarantees that she would get a seat on the powerful House Appropriations Committee and retain her seniority if she won. Such promises are standard procedure for both parties to entice potentially strong candidates to run. In a year when control of Congress is likely to hinge on a few dozen races around the country, the national Republican...
NEWS
By Ronald Brownstein and Ronald Brownstein,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 7, 2006
WASHINGTON -- The war in Iraq continued to dominate the battle for control of Congress yesterday, as President Bush and Democratic leaders launched their final appeals in a midterm election that could go down as the most expensive and one of the nastiest ever. With a flurry of late national surveys differing on whether Republicans might be reducing the Democratic advantage, leading Democrats urged Americans to demand a new direction in Iraq by ousting the GOP majorities in the House and Senate.
NEWS
By Jack Germond and Jules Witcover | August 20, 1992
HOUSTON -- President Bush's strategy of emulating Harry Truman's successful 1948 campaign against an uncooperative Congress seems at first blush a foolhardy one.With general agreement that the current legislative gridlock results from split responsibility -- the executive branch in Republican hands, the legislative in Democratic -- the obvious answer is control of both branches by one party, and the chances of the Republicans winning Congress seem next...
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | July 23, 2001
WASHINGTON - As a president elected with a minority popular vote, George W. Bush and his political strategists obviously recognize that he faces a stiff test between now and 2004 to position himself for re-election. For all the brave talk about having a mandate, the jury is still out on the comfort level the American people feel with him in the Oval Office. That test in fact may have a much closer deadline of less than 16 months from now, in the next congressional elections. If the Democrats manage to hold onto or increase their one-vote majority in the Senate and pick up the six seats they need to control the House, the second half of President Bush's term could be a nightmare for him. Events of recent weeks on Capitol Hill have already demonstrated how critical to Mr. Bush's agenda the loss of Senate leadership and disaffection of Republican moderates in the House have become.
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 1, 2000
WASHINGTON - With elections less than a week away, Republicans are tantalizingly close to gaining control of both the White House and Congress for the first time in nearly a half-century. The down-to-the-wire national campaign has all but obscured the prospects for that historic achievement, which would cap decades of partisan realignment away from the Democrats and toward the Republicans. "My hunch is, that's the most logical scenario," says Stephen Hess of the Brookings Institution.
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