Advertisement
HomeCollectionsControl Group
IN THE NEWS

Control Group

FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By SAN FRANCISCO EXAMINER | July 4, 1996
University of Illinois researchers have found that when workers listen to the music of their choice, their productivity improves, whether they are engaged in menial administrative tasks or more complex analytical work.What's more, tuned-in employees report feeling more enthusiastic and relaxed.Based on surveys of their moods, music also was found to block out distractions and reduce fatigue and nervousness. However, it was the improved relaxation, and not other factors, that accounted for the boost in productivity, the researchers said.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | January 17, 2013
The National Rifle Association and a trade organization representing the $13.6 billion gun industry began work in Annapolis this week as the General Assembly prepared to debate some of the nation's strictest gun laws. The NRA held a meeting for about 25 lawmakers Thursday to discuss strategy in a conversation expected to intensify as early as Friday morning, when Gov. Martin O'Malley releases details of his gun control plan. On Wednesday, the National Shooting Sports Foundation registered prominent Annapolis firm Alexander & Cleaver on its behalf.
Advertisement
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | April 20, 1993
WASHINGTON -- With the effectiveness of Head Start under attack, a widely followed long-term study suggests that the federal program and others like it for poor children can make a difference beyond the children's school years.The survey, by the High/Scope Educational Research Foundation of Ypsilanti, Mich., has tracked 62 people since the late 1960s, when the participants were 3- and 4-year-olds and enrolled in the Perry Preschool Program in Ypsilanti. Sixty-one students in a control group not enrolled in a preschool program also were tracked, during the same time, between the ages of 3 to 11 and again when both groups were 14, 15 and 19.The participants who attended Perry, now 27, have greater earning power, more stable marriages and fewer children out of wedlock than those in the control group, according to the latest installment of the study, which was released Sunday in Boston at a meeting of the Education Writers of America.
NEWS
By Bob LaMendola and Bob LaMendola,South Florida Sun-Sentinel | December 22, 2006
Just as exercise strengthens the body, a new study has found for the first time that brain exercise strengthens the ability of seniors to think more clearly and perform everyday tasks needed to continue to live independently. Healthy seniors who had just 10 hours of classes to improve their reasoning powers reported having significantly less trouble than others with cooking, shopping and other activities, the study showed - and the benefits were still present five years later. The study, in this week's Journal of the American Medical Association, holds out hope that simple classes for the public could have powerful effects on seniors' lives, said Sally Schumaker, a professor of public health at Wake Forest University.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | May 22, 2006
Before he entered the Quantum Opportunities Program, Darwin Ajin said he was about to quit school. Ajin, 16, is a junior at Herndon High School in Virginia. His parents are immigrants from Guatemala who moved to the Washington suburb. Two years ago, before he joined QOP, Ajin said he was making F's and D's in all his subjects. He noticed some of his friends went to QOP, located in an apartment complex three miles from the high school, to get help with their homework. One of his teachers asked Ajin if he wanted to be part of the program.
NEWS
By Bob LaMendola and Bob LaMendola,South Florida Sun-Sentinel | December 22, 2006
Just as exercise strengthens the body, a new study has found for the first time that brain exercise strengthens the ability of seniors to think more clearly and perform everyday tasks needed to continue to live independently. Healthy seniors who had just 10 hours of classes to improve their reasoning powers reported having significantly less trouble than others with cooking, shopping and other activities, the study showed - and the benefits were still present five years later. The study, in this week's Journal of the American Medical Association, holds out hope that simple classes for the public could have powerful effects on seniors' lives, said Sally Schumaker, a professor of public health at Wake Forest University.
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,Staff Writer | October 19, 1993
Hoping to capitalize on a perceived groundswell in public opinion, a state group will announce today a sweeping gun control proposal that would give Maryland one of the strictest gun laws in the nation.The proposal, which is certain to face stiff opposition in Annapolis, would require a Marylander to pass a safety test and acquire a license before buying a handgun or handgun ammunition.State residents would be limited to two handgun purchases a year and could own no more than 10 handguns overall unless they received special permission from the state police.
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | January 17, 2013
The National Rifle Association and a trade organization representing the $13.6 billion gun industry began work in Annapolis this week as the General Assembly prepared to debate some of the nation's strictest gun laws. The NRA held a meeting for about 25 lawmakers Thursday to discuss strategy in a conversation expected to intensify as early as Friday morning, when Gov. Martin O'Malley releases details of his gun control plan. On Wednesday, the National Shooting Sports Foundation registered prominent Annapolis firm Alexander & Cleaver on its behalf.
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | September 16, 1994
There were winners and losers in Tuesday's primary election, but there was also something else:A quiet revolution.In June of last year, I wrote about how Marylanders Against Handgun Abuse (MAHA) intended to propose a comprehensive gun control bill, send it to each candidate for state office in the 1994 election and then tell the public which candidates supported gun control and which did not.The comprehensive bill would:1. Require the licensing of handgun and handgun ammunition purchasers.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 4, 2005
MIAMI -- A national gun-control group is riling Gov. Jeb Bush and Florida's mighty tourism industry by warning visitors that arguing with locals here could get them shot. The group, the Brady Campaign to Prevent Gun Violence, based in Washington, began handing out fliers at the Miami International Airport yesterday, cautioning visitors to take "sensible precautions" and to be aware that altercations on highways, in nightclubs or on the beach could provoke a shooting. The fliers offer tips such as "Do not argue unnecessarily with local people" and "If someone appears to be angry with you, maintain to the best of your ability a positive attitude and do not shout or make threatening gestures."
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | May 22, 2006
Before he entered the Quantum Opportunities Program, Darwin Ajin said he was about to quit school. Ajin, 16, is a junior at Herndon High School in Virginia. His parents are immigrants from Guatemala who moved to the Washington suburb. Two years ago, before he joined QOP, Ajin said he was making F's and D's in all his subjects. He noticed some of his friends went to QOP, located in an apartment complex three miles from the high school, to get help with their homework. One of his teachers asked Ajin if he wanted to be part of the program.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 4, 2005
MIAMI -- A national gun-control group is riling Gov. Jeb Bush and Florida's mighty tourism industry by warning visitors that arguing with locals here could get them shot. The group, the Brady Campaign to Prevent Gun Violence, based in Washington, began handing out fliers at the Miami International Airport yesterday, cautioning visitors to take "sensible precautions" and to be aware that altercations on highways, in nightclubs or on the beach could provoke a shooting. The fliers offer tips such as "Do not argue unnecessarily with local people" and "If someone appears to be angry with you, maintain to the best of your ability a positive attitude and do not shout or make threatening gestures."
NEWS
By Jeff Barker and Jeff Barker,SUN STAFF | September 21, 2002
KENSINGTON - Local members of a national handgun-control organization are protesting the group's decision to stick with its endorsement of a Republican, Rep. Constance A. Morella, in the 8th District congressional race. Montgomery County members of the Brady Campaign to Prevent Gun Violence question the group's support for Morella in a year in which Democrats, more aligned with gun control than the GOP, have a chance to gain a majority in the House of Representatives. In a letter sent yesterday to the Brady group in Washington, three leaders of the organization's local rank and file said Morella's Democratic opponent, Christopher Van Hollen Jr., "has not only voted right on the issues, but has led the fight in the Maryland Assembly for sensible gun laws."
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Liz Bowie and Erika Niedowski and Liz Bowie,SUN STAFF | August 18, 2000
A struggle for control within the Baltimore Teachers Union has broken out, highlighting long-standing political rivalries and raising questions about how members' money is spent. On one side is Sharon Blake, the new head of the union's 7,000 teachers, who ousted the incumbent president in May by two votes. On the other is Lorretta Johnson, the president for 30 years of the chapter of about 1,600 teacher aides. For years, the two chapters have operated as one, with Johnson the unofficial leader of both.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,SUN STAFF | June 16, 2000
Unwanted cats and dogs are posing a distressing new problem for humane societies across Maryland: what to do with the animals after euthanasia. A Virginia-based rendering company, Valley Proteins of Winchester, has stopped accepting the carcasses of cats and dogs, leaving many county animal control agencies to find a new way to dispose of society's cast-off companions. "Now, all of a sudden, every animal shelter is left high and dry with no place to send their animals," said Nicky Ratliff, executive director of the Humane Society in Carroll County and president of Professional Animal Workers of Maryland, the state association of humane organizations and animal control agencies.
NEWS
By Thomas Ginsberg and Thomas Ginsberg,KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | February 1, 1998
TRENTON, N.J. -- For years, part of the emotional debate over welfare in America was focused on this question: Are welfare recipients encouraged to keep bearing children by benefits that rise every time they do?New Jersey lawmakers four years ago acted to cut off recipients from additional benefits if they had any more children. Many other states followed suit. But the question remained unanswered.A long-awaited study in New Jersey meant to answer that question was released recently - with inconclusive findings.
NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,SUN STAFF | February 22, 1996
The small-caliber bullet that struck Kenneth Harvard Jr. earlier this month while he was sledding in Howard County's Guilford neighborhood spared his life but dashed his dreams.The 19-year-old is blind in one eye from the bullet in his head and may never achieve his ambition of being a military chef.Yesterday at an Ellicott City news conference called by Howard County Clergy for Social Justice, Howard supporters of Gov. Parris N. Glendening's tough new gun control proposal cited the Guilford resident as an illustration of why such restrictions are needed.
NEWS
May 24, 1994
Marylanders Against Handgun Abuse raised $30,000 yesterday to help tell voters which candidates favor -- and which oppose -- proposals for tougher state gun control laws.The money was collected during a breakfast honoring Gov. William Donald Schaefer for an eight-year push against the National Rifle Association and other opponents of gun control."He was willing to stand up. He had much advice not to do it. But he did," said Richard O. Berndt, an officer of the organization. "He did what he thought was right."
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | January 2, 1998
Baltimore County Executive C. A. Dutch Ruppersberger has replaced the veteran chairwoman of the county Landmarks Preservation Commission, a move that cements his appointees' control over a group that has questioned his commitment to saving historic buildings.Ruth B. Mascari, chairwoman for more than five years, is being replaced as a board member by W. Boulton Kelly, 69, a semiretired architect who specialized in exterior preservations and was formerly a member of the Baltimore Commission for Historic and Architectural Preservation.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 6, 1997
Maryland's two most populous counties have become the latest jurisdictions around the country -- and the first in the state -- to adopt laws requiring that any sale of a handgun include a safety lock for the trigger.In measures passed last week, Prince George's County and Montgomery County in the Washington suburbs have followed Connecticut, Massachusetts, Chicago and more than a dozen cities and counties in California that have enacted similar laws in recent years to reduce inadvertent shootings, especially by children.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.