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NEWS
November 30, 2011
I am a big fan of transparency and disclosure in government, but one of the leaps made in The Sun's recent article about contributions by certain companies to the Democratic Governor's Association is misleading and needs to be corrected. ("Firms with Md. interests give to Democratic group," Nov. 27.) After describing contributions by a company called Competitive Power Ventures, the article states that in "October, CPV got what it wanted" when the Maryland Public Service Commission ordered utilities to consider proposals for new power plants to be built in Maryland.
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SPORTS
By Jon Meoli and The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2014
When Orioles first baseman Steve Pearce was sidelined for five games last week, his absence left a big hole in the lineup. Nobody realized it more than manager Buck Showalter. "He's in a little bit different stage of his career where people are counting on him, and he's kind of become a guy that we're leaning on," Showalter said. "That's what I've tried to relay to him, that you're a valuable part of this club. " Pearce, who was released by the Orioles earlier this season - and for the first six years of his career was the definition of a replacement player - has been one of several unlikely contributors for a team that won the American League East crown and is preparing to start the postseason on Thursday at Camden Yards.
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NEWS
May 11, 2013
The obituary for Richard E. Hug (May 7) fell far short of honoring the legacy of a man who dedicated so many years to helping make Baltimore's non-profits better able to fulfill their missions. While the obit focused on Dick's political fundraising, it did not recognize the contributions he made to organizations such as Kennedy Krieger Institute, the National Aquarium in Baltimore , and the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, to name but a few. He was a founding board member of the aquarium.
NEWS
September 17, 2014
Much attention is being paid to the relative fundraising prowess of the candidates and their cash-on-hand advantages as the election approaches ( "Howard developer's campaign contributions are cause for concern," Sept. 11). But what does this really signify? If there were a direct correspondence between dollars raised and votes received, only millionaires would be holding office. Where are the contributions coming from? From individuals who believe deeply in the candidate stance on issues?
NEWS
September 11, 2014
Jon Weinstein, the District 1 Democratic candidate for the Howard County Council, tried to reassure the voting public that "nobody should be concerned" about the $9,000 in contributions linked to developer Don Reuwer ( "Howard developer uses 'LLC loophole' on Weinstein finance report," Sept. 4). I am most certainly not reassured. Learning that the Reuwer contributions constitute more than 16 percent of Mr. Weinstein's fundraising total makes me highly skeptical. Learning that another 38 percent comes from PACs (including the Home Builders PAC of Howard County and the police, fire and teachers' unions whose members will benefit from County Council votes)
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | January 3, 2013
Catonsville developer Steve W. Whalen Jr. pleaded guilty Thursday in Baltimore County Circuit Court to five counts of election-law violations for illegally funneling money to a county councilman's campaign and exceeding political contribution limits. Whalen, 62, was fined $53,000 in a plea agreement worked out by his attorneys and state prosecutors. He already has paid $5,000 in civil fines related to the case, his lawyer said. Each count had carried a potential of one year in prison.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee and The Baltimore Sun | January 10, 2013
Terrell Suggs has been quiet lately, compiling zero sacks and just seven tackles in the Ravens' past six games, including the team's 24-9 victory over the Indianapolis Colts in last Sunday's AFC Wildcard round. The five-time Pro Bowler has a few valid excuses. He missed the first six games of the season after undergoing surgery to repair a partially torn right Achilles tendon in April and then tore his right biceps in a 23-20 loss to the Pittsburgh Steelers on Dec. 2. That injury sidelined him for the Ravens' 31-28 overtime loss to the Washington Redskins the following Sunday and persuaded the coaching and medical staffs to shelve him for the regular-season finale against the Cincinnati Bengals on Dec. 30. After Sunday's win, Suggs told Yahoo!
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | June 11, 2014
Baltimore officials approved a $3.4 million deal Wednesday to sell a Fells Point pier for development of a luxury hotel after chiding a developer for trying to include campaign contributions to local politicians as part of the project's costs. Recreation Pier Developers listed contributions to City Councilman James B. Kraft and Del. Peter A. Hammen as part of the more than $3 million it has spent on the project, including the $2 million purchase of the Recreational Pier on Thames Street from the city in 2010.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | April 11, 2014
After a landmark U.S. Supreme Court ruling, Maryland election officials said Friday that they will no longer enforce a state law that imposes an overall limit of $10,000 on campaign contributions in a four-year election cycle. State officials said they would continue to enforce a Maryland law limiting individuals to contributing no more than $4,000 to a particular candidate during an election cycle. Donors, however, are now free to give $4,000 to as many candidates as desired. Without the limit, moneyed donors are likely to give more - or be asked to give more - and lower-profile races are more likely to get their attention.
EXPLORE
February 13, 2013
Who among us has done something of which we are not particularly proud? Why does one misdeed overshadow the goodness of an individual? I have known the Whalen family for over 30 years and have seen their goodness and the contributions they have made to the Catonsville community. First and foremost, Mr. Whalen has provided thousands of jobs for Catonsville and Baltimore area workers — from construction folks and office workers to those who keep parking lots swept of snow.
NEWS
September 11, 2014
Jon Weinstein, the District 1 Democratic candidate for the Howard County Council, tried to reassure the voting public that "nobody should be concerned" about the $9,000 in contributions linked to developer Don Reuwer ( "Howard developer uses 'LLC loophole' on Weinstein finance report," Sept. 4). I am most certainly not reassured. Learning that the Reuwer contributions constitute more than 16 percent of Mr. Weinstein's fundraising total makes me highly skeptical. Learning that another 38 percent comes from PACs (including the Home Builders PAC of Howard County and the police, fire and teachers' unions whose members will benefit from County Council votes)
NEWS
By Kalman R. Hettleman | August 29, 2014
Since at least the 1970s, there has been little for unions to celebrate on Labor Day. The giant teachers unions - the National Education Association (NEA) and the American Federation of Teachers (AFT) - have been an exception, largely retaining their size and influence. But now even teachers unions are an endangered species. This June a California judge ruled that the tenure and seniority provisions in teachers collective bargaining agreements were unconstitutional. These contractual benefits for teachers, the judge wrote, impose "a real and appreciable impact on students' fundamental right to equality of education and… a disproportionate burden on poor and minority students.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | August 21, 2014
The officer involved in the fatal shooting of 18-year-old Michael Brown in Ferguson, Mo., is getting support from the Anne Arundel County police union. The Fraternal Order of Police Lodge 70, the union that represents officers in Anne Arundel, has donated $1,070 to an online defense fund for Ferguson police officer Darren Wilson. That's the largest donation listed for the campaign on the website gofundme.com. O'Brien Atkinson, an Anne Arundel County police officer and president of the lodge, said his members wanted to send money to help feed police officers working long shifts during the protests and unrest that have erupted since Wilson shot Brown on Aug. 9. But the national FOP suggested contributing to the legal defense fund instead.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector and Nayana Davis, The Baltimore Sun | August 11, 2014
The city of Baltimore and CSX Transportation have agreed to split the cost of rebuilding the one-block retaining wall that collapsed along East 26th Street in Charles Village, ending months of negotiations over who was responsible and how much taxpayers would cover. City officials said Monday they expect the collapse to cost taxpayers about $7.5 million - though the total could increase as construction continues - and CSX would pay the rest. The entire project is now expected to cost about $15 million, down from an initial estimate of $18.5 million.
NEWS
By Peter Morici | July 29, 2014
The Labor Department is expected to report this week that the economy added 235,000 jobs in July, and the unemployment rate remained steady at 6.1 percent. But that hardly tells the story. The jobless rate may be down from its recession peak of 10 percent, but much of this results from adults - discouraged by the lack of decent job openings - having given up altogether. They are neither employed nor looking for work. Only about half of the drop in the adult participation rate may be attributed to the Baby Boom generation reaching retirement age. Lacking adequate resources to retire, a larger percentage of adults over 65 are working now than before the recession.
NEWS
July 14, 2014
Last month, Baltimore County Executive Kevin Kamenetz wrote a letter to Maryland Transportation Secretary James T. Smith Jr. indicating his displeasure with certain aspects of the proposed Red Line light rail project. He doesn't want the county to contribute nearly as much as the state has proposed, and he wants the county's portion of the 14-mile line to be built in an "early phase" of construction. But that doesn't really capture the sheer audacity of the letter. That Mr. Kamenetz would make such demands on such a major transportation project is truly the tail wagging the dog. What he is barking at is a mere $50 million contribution - compared to financially-strapped Baltimore's expected $200 million share.
NEWS
March 3, 2011
Collective bargaining is recognized as a right of workers that allows them to achieve a form of workplace democracy. The United Nations' Universal Declaration of Human Rights adopted in 1948 states in Article 23 that "Everyone has the right to form and to join trade unions for the protection of his interests. " Yet, while we in the U.S. cheer for the Egyptians, Tunisians, Libyans and others in Middle East countries who risk their lives to achieve democracy and reach for better lives for themselves in their countries, some newly-elected public officials seek to end the democratic process of collective bargaining for public workers.
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | January 21, 2014
Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler opened a new line of attack Tuesday against fellow Democrat Lt. Gov. Anthony G. Brown: campaign contributions from donors with links to the flubbed Maryland health exchange. Gansler's gubernatorial campaign said Tuesday that it had identified more than $33,000 in donations from companies, lobbyists and executives with ties to the exchange in recent campaign finance reports that Brown has filed in the race for governor. The Gansler campaign asked whether it was appropriate for Brown to accept those donations when he oversaw the exchange.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | July 10, 2014
Baltimore County Executive Kevin Kamenetz is balking at the price of the Red Line transit project, telling state officials the county will contribute about half the funding it is being asked for - and only if certain conditions are met. Kamenetz outlined his stance in a letter to state officials late last month, saying the county is willing to pay $26.5 million in "in-kind" contributions for the transit line - covering street realignments, stormwater...
NEWS
By Sean Welsh and Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | June 30, 2014
One patient was released from hospital care and another was in stable condition at the University of Maryland Shock Trauma Monday, after the two fell 200 feet off Prettyboy Dam in northern Baltimore County this weekend, police said. It was not clear whether the men, in their early 20s, were hiking or kayaking before the fall, Baltimore Environmental Police Officer Heidi Greenleaf said, but alcohol was a factor in the incident. The men were not identified. The one who was released from York General Hospital had a broken left arm and head injuries, and the other remained hospitalized at Shock Trauma Monday with a severe head injury, possible broken bones and internal injuries, Greenleaf said.
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