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By Michael Wines and Michael Wines,New York Times News Service | July 19, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Robert M. Gates was regularly briefed in 1986 on Central Intelligence Agency efforts to assist the Nicaraguan contras by the CIA official who admitted last week that he joined in a cover-up of the Iran-contra scandal, according to a former agency official familiar with Mr. Gates' schedule.The briefings, which numbered from three to seven over a six-month period, were said to focus on a legal and congressionally approved CIA program to assist the rebels, not on the separate, secret arms pipeline to the contras that was then being run from the White House by Oliver L. North.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Alexandra Fenwick and Alexandra Fenwick,SUN STAFF | June 17, 2004
Every Wednesday night at 8, Lovely Lane Church is filled to bursting with the sound of stomping, clapping, laughing, banjo-plucking and guitar-strumming. A peek into the church's recreation hall reveals a brigade of dock shoes, jazz shoes, sneakers and even bowling shoes dancing their way across a blond hardwood floor to the commands of a caller urging their wearers to form patterns like a "right hand star" in time with the live band on stage. The scene is dizzying; the fiddler is going a mile a minute, the women's colorful skirts flare as they whirl around the room, and the men's feet don't seem to stop.
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NEWS
By DENNIS BERNSTEIN AND ROBERT KNIGHT and DENNIS BERNSTEIN AND ROBERT KNIGHT,Knight-Ridder/Tribune News Service | September 29, 1996
BOB DOLE AND Bill Clinton are dueling over who will be tougher in the fight to end America's growing drug dependency. Yet neither candidate has condemned the CIA's alleged involvement in generating the nation's largest influx of drugs in modern history.Thanks to a recent investigative series in the San Jose Mercury News, the CIA-drug connection is back in the news."This drug network opened the first pipeline between Colombia's cocaine cartels and the black neighborhoods of Los Angeles, a city now known as the 'crack' capital of the world," Gary Webb of the Mercury News wrote.
NEWS
By Linda Chavez | December 4, 2003
WASHINGTON -- The Reagans, the controversial made-for-TV movie, finally made its way into American homes this week -- but not nearly as many homes as originally planned after CBS moved it to its smaller, premium cable channel Showtime. I watched the entire three-hour melodrama in order to participate in a special Showtime panel discussion, aired after the movie, along with five other people who were invited to comment. The other guests included Reagan biographer and former Washington Post reporter Lou Cannon; veteran newsman Marvin Kalb; longtime Reagan adviser Martin Anderson, who is also the editor of three published collections of Ronald Reagan's letters, speeches and radio commentaries; and two Reagan critics, AIDS activist Hilary Rosen and the film's co-producer, Carl Anthony.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 6, 1996
WASHINGTON -- The Central Intelligence Agency said yesterday it has no record of any CIA relationship with the principal members of a Nicaraguan-American cocaine-trafficking ring that operated in California during the 1980s.In a legal declaration filed in federal court in San Diego and released in Washington, the CIA said it knew as early as 1984 that cocaine smuggler Norvin Meneses was a major drug trafficker.But it said a search of its records found no evidence of any CIA relationship with Meneses.
NEWS
November 17, 1996
Jack Blum was special counsel to a Senate subcommittee that investigated contra drug operations in 1987-88. On Oct. 23, he testified before the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence, chaired by Sen. Arlen Specter. The hearings were sparked by the San Jose Mercury News' series "Dark Alliance." Here are excerpts from Blum's testimony:Blum: If you ask the question, did the CIA sell drugs in the black neighborhoods of Los Angeles, to finance the contra war, the answer will be a categorical no.The fact of the matter is, we found no evidence whatsoever to suggest that there was a targeting of the African-American community.
NEWS
February 24, 1991
Nicaragua has little to show for a year of democratically elected government dedicated to reconciliation. Few Nicaraguans are reconciled.Inflation is running at 12,000 percent and unemployment at 40 percent. The government of Violetta Chamorro is split between moderates, who approve her concessions to the ousted Sandinistas, and hard-line ex-contras who want faster land redistribution to former contra soldiers.The Sandinista-controlled unions are on a new round of strikes, anticipating austerities that the International Monetary Fund wants Mrs. Chamorro to impose.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 17, 1998
WASHINGTON -- The Central Intelligence Agency continued to work with about two dozen Nicaraguan rebels and their supporters during the 1980s despite allegations that they were trafficking in drugs, according to a classified study by the CIA.The new study has found that the CIA's decision to keep these paid agents, or to continue dealing with them in some less-formal relationship, was made by top officials at the agency's headquarters in Langley, Va., in...
NEWS
January 17, 1992
MANAGUA, Nicaragua -- The government of President Violeta Chamorro spurred negotiations with armed bands yesterday in an effort to pacify Nicaragua on the eve of a visit by U.S. Secretary of State James A. Baker III.A peaceful Nicaragua is a must for continued U.S. aid. Mr. Baker, who arrives for a five-hour visit today, stressed the need for peace last November after rioting by Sandinista Front militants caused millions of dollars of damage to public property.Interior...
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | November 19, 1996
Speakers at a forum on the alleged CIA-crack connection last night in East Baltimore called for a national records act that would enable the release of documents that could reveal the full extent of U.S. intelligence involvement in importing crack cocaine from Latin America.The forum last night at Dunbar High School -- sponsored by Sojourner Douglass College, the Central American Solidarity Committee and Radio One Inc. -- attracted more than 200 people, who heard speakers allege that CIA operatives were involved with drug traffickers in the 1980s to raise money for the contra army, which was fighting the Marxist Sandinista government in Nicaragua.
NEWS
By Johanna Neuman and Johanna Neuman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 11, 2003
WASHINGTON - Donald T. Regan, who rose from an Irish working class background to serve as a groundbreaking chairman and chief executive officer of Merrill Lynch and later as Treasury secretary and disputed chief of staff for President Ronald Reagan, died yesterday. He was 84. Mr. Regan, who had been battling cancer, died at a hospital in Williamsburg, Va. He was admitted to the hospital Sunday. The target of first lady Nancy Reagan's ire, he was a tenacious White House chief of staff, who demanded loyalty, controlled the flow of information and likened his role to that of a prime minister.
NEWS
May 2, 2003
Albert A. Hakim, 66, an Iranian-born former Silicon Valley businessman who was a central figure in the Reagan administration's Iran-Contra scandal of the 1980s, died of a heart attack April 25 in Inchon, South Korea, where he moved a few years ago. Charged with five felony counts of conspiracy to divert funds illegally to the Nicaraguan contras and theft of government property, Hakim pleaded guilty in 1989 to a single misdemeanor count of making an...
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | August 19, 2002
I WOULD LIKE to ask the usual suspects - state highway crews, state police, U.S. Park Police, Anne Arundel County police and other Hon Man contras - to respect the "Hon" placard Hon Man placed on the Welcome-to-Baltimore sign on the BW Parkway on Saturday morning. That's the first such "Hon" posting since March, when a doctor told Baltimore's unofficial greeter he had non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. The man is up and around again, and doing his thing. So, in the strongest Bawlmer accent I can muster, I'd like you all to leave his sign "A-lone!"
NEWS
By Jay Hancock and Jay Hancock,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 19, 2001
WASHINGTON - Concerned that the United Nations might convene in September without a U.S. ambassador, the Bush administration and congressional Republicans are stepping up pressure on Senate Democrats for quick action on the disputed nomination of John D. Negroponte. Democrats are resisting, saying the administration hasn't produced key documents that could shed light on Negroponte's sensitive tenure as ambassador to Honduras in the 1980s. Negroponte, 62, was closely involved with the U.S. effort to arm the contras fighting the leftist Sandinista government in Nicaragua.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 30, 2001
WASHINGTON - His name conjures up vague images of the 1980s, a time of hostages and Central American "freedom fighters," the ayatollah and Oliver L. North. Elliott Abrams, a key figure in the Iran-contra scandal, which tarnished the Reagan administration, is again working for a Republican president, a move that is delighting conservatives and troubling liberals. The former assistant secretary of state, who pleaded guilty to two counts of misleading Congress and was pardoned by President George Bush, began his duties this week as senior director of the office of democracy, human rights and international operations on the National Security Council staff at the White House.
FEATURES
By Amanda J. Crawford and Amanda J. Crawford,SUN STAFF | June 25, 2001
It's Baltimore, the late 1980s. And a wild band with circus-act flair and a charismatic drummer has just started to play its unique blend of avant-garde funk-rock-jazz-rap-big band-punk-soul music at Maryland Institute parties. They have played a handful of gigs but have decided at a rowdy basement house party that it's time to choose a name. Band members scrawl ideas on slips of paper to be drawn from a hat just as they go on. But a friend drops the hat and the names disappear under the crush of feet on a beer-soaked floor.
NEWS
October 10, 1991
Predictably, the Wall Street Journal screamed "character assassination" in its editorial comment on this week's guilty plea by Elliott Abrams, one of the Reagan administration's fiercest ideological warriors. Abrams pleaded guilty to two misdemeanor counts of withholding information from Congress about secret administration efforts to aid the Nicaraguan contras. He also agreed to cooperate with the independent prosecutor, Lawrence Walsh, in his probe of the Iran-contra scandal and other high-level wrongdoing during the Reagan administration.
NEWS
May 2, 2003
Albert A. Hakim, 66, an Iranian-born former Silicon Valley businessman who was a central figure in the Reagan administration's Iran-Contra scandal of the 1980s, died of a heart attack April 25 in Inchon, South Korea, where he moved a few years ago. Charged with five felony counts of conspiracy to divert funds illegally to the Nicaraguan contras and theft of government property, Hakim pleaded guilty in 1989 to a single misdemeanor count of making an...
NEWS
By Jay Hancock, Gary Cohn and Tom Bowman and Jay Hancock, Gary Cohn and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 7, 2001
WASHINGTON - John D. Negroponte, a retired career diplomat who helped conceal from Congress the murder, kidnapping and torture abuses of a CIA-equipped and -trained Honduran military unit while he was ambassador to that country in the 1980s, was nominated yesterday by President Bush to be the next U.S. ambassador to the United Nations. Bush said that Negroponte will be a "key member" of the administration's foreign policy team. A State Department spokesman called Negroponte "one of our most accomplished professional diplomats" despite questions about the former ambassador's conduct in Honduras.
NEWS
By Edward Hegstrom and Edward Hegstrom,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 8, 1998
PALOMAR, Nicaragua -- The newspapers say the Nicaraguan civil war ended eight years ago, but Comandante Modesto Olivar swears it isn't true.A Sandinista combat fighter who joined the movement 20 years ago at age 16, Olivar never adjusted to civilian life after the Sandinista leaders and the U.S.-backed contras reached a peace agreement in 1990.So, the comandante recently dragged out his old AK-47 assault rifle and retreated into this remote, malaria-ridden tropical forest, where he has joined 200 ex-Sandinista fighters who refuse to give up the war.The rebels, known as the Andres Castro United Front, control this vast, roadless wilderness along the Wani River.
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