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NEWS
By Russell Baker | November 11, 1993
AMERICANS love crime in movies, television and books, but gibber and quake when it walks their streets. This is one of many contradictions that confuse efforts to reduce crime.A nation hooked on violent entertainment can hardly be expected to give it up because it just may happen to provide insensitivity training for children, can it?So reasons galore are adduced for not giving it up: It is not proven for sure that these entertainments do debase children. Even if it were proven, people who like being entertained with horrific violence are entitled to a steady supply.
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NEWS
By David Horsey | May 20, 2014
The late, great New York senator, Daniel Patrick Moynihan, famously said, "You are entitled to your opinion, but you are not entitled to your own facts. " That sentiment, however wise, seems sadly quaint in an era when many Americans strongly prefer a "reality" that conforms to their opinion, not to objective facts. A fresh case in point is Marco Rubio, the boyish Florida senator who is considered a serious contender for the U.S. presidency in 2016. Sunday, on ABC's "This Week," Mr. Rubio said, "I do not believe that human activity is causing these dramatic changes to our climate the way these scientists are portraying it," adding that he also did "not believe that the laws that they propose we pass will do anything about it, except it will destroy our economy.
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NEWS
By Robert Benjamin and Robert Benjamin,Sun Staff Writer | April 17, 1994
SINGAPORE -- This affluent city-state is a Southeast Asian Oz, a miraculous place of undeniable material achievements -- ,, complete with its own wizard, founding father Lee Kuan Yew.But it also may be as close as you can get to a "Brave New World" -- a nation of educated sheep controlled by an authoritarian government so thoroughly and efficiently that even though Singapore is committed to capitalism, it's openly admired by the Chinese Communist Party."
NEWS
December 5, 2013
It is most disturbing that former Maryland Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. and so many current members of the U.S. Senate and House do not understand that minority rule in either house of Congress was one of the fears expressed by the Framers of the Constitution ( "The nuclear option: then and now," Dec. 1). The "nuclear option" of eliminating the filibuster for certain appointments is not a reversal of the intent of the Framers - it is a return to their original intent. Indeed, the entire portion of Rule 22 of the Senate that requires any vote to be more than a majority of the quorum present is in violation of the higher ranking "supreme law of the land.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | February 19, 1994
Life is full of contradictions between such things as rationality and intuition, order and chaos, scientific knowledge and our own imperfect perceptions of the world. Those opposites have become more extreme in this age, when technological advances bombard us with so much knowledge that we can comprehend it only in tiny, even meaningless, fragments."A Far Light," a challenging new exhibit at the University of Maryland Baltimore County, brings together seven artists whose works deal with such issues.
NEWS
June 25, 1991
America's preoccupation with fitness has produced some jarring contradictions -- light cheesecake and light beef, diet ice cream and low-calorie Twinkies. So it probably could have been expected: Taylor California Cellars is now marketing a diet Chablis, which has 50 percent fewer calories than the real stuff, and 70 percent less alcohol.The new wine is supposed to appeal to men and women who don't usually drink alcohol but are a tad uncomfortable ordering a diet Coke with scampi. But it will, undoubtedly, be a smash hit among joggers and fiber-eaters as well.
FEATURES
By Gary Graff and Gary Graff,Knight-Ridder Newspapers | May 21, 1992
It's music that doesn't bop or drive or grind or charge.Instead, it washes across your ears in sonic sheets, blending guitars, drums and vocals into dense layers that disregard the standard stereophonic sensibilities of balance, clarity and separation.It's a sound of contradictions -- thick but ethereal, dissonant but melodious, complex but seemingly simple, mostly because it's difficult to pick individual parts out of the deliberately murky mixes.The touchstones are familiar: Any fan of late-'60s psychedelia will hear echoes of the Beatles, Pink Floyd and the Velvet Underground.
NEWS
By TRUDY RUBIN | May 26, 2006
TEHRAN -- The contradictions that make Iran so difficult for Westerners to understand are on view on arrival at Tehran airport. Since we fingerprint Iranians when they enter America, anyone holding an American passport is escorted the length of Tehran airport to be fingerprinted. Each finger is individually pressed on an inkpad and pressed again on white paper, leaving stains. But the whole process is accompanied by smiles and apologies. The Iranian relationship with the U.S. may be problematic, but Iranians are happy to greet Americans face to face.
NEWS
By Richard Eder and Richard Eder,Los Angeles Times | February 6, 1994
Title: "Bertolt Brecht Journals, 1934-1955"Editor: John Willett; translated from the German by Hugh RorrisonPublisher: Routledge0$ Length, price: 556 pages, $39.95Bertolt Brecht was ostensibly a Marxist playwright, but that is a bit like saying that George Bernard Shaw was a vegetarian playwright. Brecht, like Shaw, in fact, juggled ideas like flaming torches while trying, less successfully than Shaw, to keep his distance from the heat. In his theater the ideas are primarily characters; their role is far more dramatic than intellectual.
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,Staff Writer | July 14, 1992
Caren Kemner rolls up the short sleeves of her red, white and blue uniform shirt like some sort of James Dean wannabe. She screams at her teammates, her voice booming through a gymnasium. She glares at her opponents.But when she soars, above the other players, above the net, she is transformed. Suddenly, there is a look of pure enchantment on her face. Her eyes, glazed over in rage one moment, are suddenly focused. A frozen smile creases her lips. And her clenched right hand, the one that is taped like a prize fighter's, comes hooking down from the sky, sending a white, leather volleyball into a 95-mph dive to the floor.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | November 25, 2012
He had lost a son many years before, the boy barely more than a toddler when he died. Now another son was dead, and grief sat on him like the shawl that draped his shoulders as he rattled around the big, cold house. His wife was emotionally troubled and spent money they did not have. His subordinates were insubordinate, convinced he was out of his depth and that they could do a better job. And his country had split along a ragged seam of geography and race, boys from Maine and Vermont fighting it out against boys from Georgia and Tennessee, their bodies left broken, bloated, bloody and fly-swarmed, dead by the profligate thousands.
NEWS
October 25, 2012
A central message of those leading the campaign against Maryland's same-sex marriage law is that they are not opposed to gays and lesbians or to ensuring their civil rights. But that contention is undermined by the video of a town hall meeting at Manna Bible Baptist Church in Baltimore in which a Randallstown pastor quoted Scripture to say that homosexuality or even condoning homosexuality is "worthy of death. " He went on to say that those who vote for Question 6 are "approving these things that are worthy of death.
EXPLORE
November 7, 2011
Twenty children in Dickinson are being isolated from their community. Under the new elementary school redistricting plan, all Dickinson kids will attend either Atholton or Hammond, except for the 20 living on Blue Sea Drive, Sandrope Court and Stonebrook Lane, located north of Guilford Road and west of Broken Land Parkway. These kids in Polygons 16 and 1016 will be bused east to Guilford. To reach their closest classmate, they will travel 1.4 miles across Broken Land Parkway and along the industrial area of Guilford Road.
NEWS
July 28, 2011
If Lainy LeBow-Sachs and Zelig Robinson want to kick off the third member of the new William Donald Schaefer Foundation — longtime friend of the deceased mayor and governor, Gene Raynor — they probably have the power to do it. It is a private foundation, they control two-thirds of the votes on the board, and if they believe the first order of business ought to be to shrink the governing body from three to two, with Mr. Raynor being the unwilling casualty,...
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | June 7, 2011
Chantay Kangalee took the stand as a reluctant witness for her brother's killer on Tuesday and contradicted parts of the state's carefully built murder case against Baltimore police Officer Gahiji Tshamba. Kangalee confirmed accounts that Tshamba pulled a gun on her brother, Tyrone Brown, outside a back entrance to Mount Vernon's Red Maple lounge in the early morning of June 5, 2010, after Brown had groped one of the officer's female friends. But she added that Brown, a Marine veteran, pushed the off-duty officer and steadily advanced — with his hands held out — toward Tshamba, who was backing up with his gun drawn.
NEWS
May 29, 2011
The latest FBI crime statistics reports are out, and Baltimore, despite its lowest homicide rate since the 1980s, is still the fifth-deadliest city in the nation and the seventh most dangerous in terms of overall violent crime. It's hard to know what to make of this. Thanks in part to the statistics-driven policing strategies we imported from New York, and in part to a morbid municipal fascination with the daily body count, Baltimore tends to closely monitor the ups and downs of crime and to link the trend to the effectiveness of the police chief or mayor.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Theater Critic | January 28, 1994
Canadian playwright George F. Walker's gritty urban comedies exult in contrasts. Even the titles seem like contradictions -- "Escape from Happiness," an extremely dark domestic comedy produced at Center Stage last season, or "Love and Anger," currently receiving a hilarious, knock-down, drag-out production at Fell's Point Corner Theatre.In "Love and Anger," a middle-age lawyer named Peter Maxwell is furious with the legal system and at the same time passionately in love with justice. Maxwell discovered the discrepancy between the law and justice after suffering a stroke, which may have left him wiser, or mentally unbalanced, depending on your point of view.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ronnie Scheib, Variety | April 1, 2011
Obsessed with how people dress, New York Times photographer Bill Cunningham unfailingly dons the same shapeless jacket; a chronicler of ritzy charity events, the octogenarian tools around Manhattan on a bike. Cunningham's two weekly spreads in the Sunday Style section form complementary opposites: "On the Street" features everyday Gothamites decked out in eclectic fashion statements, while "Evening Hours" captures the rich clad in haute couture. Whatever the Times-produced, TV-ready tribute, "Bill Cunningham New York," lacks in tension is amply compensated by the pleasure of watching an enthusiast ply the craft he loves.
NEWS
March 29, 2011
In the letters to the editor on March 26, there were two contrary views concerning the issue of state tuition for illegal immigrants. Neither, however, addressed the legality of providing this benefit to illegal aliens. Obviously those Maryland senators who voted for this benefit need to review the federal law on this issue as well. The Illegal Immigrant Reform and Immigrant Responsibility Act of 1996 states that an alien who is not lawfully present in the United States shall not be eligible on the basis of residence within a state for any post-secondary education benefit unless a citizen or national of the United States is eligible for such benefit without regard to whether the citizen or national is such a resident.
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