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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | March 11, 2010
James Robert "Bobby" Sherman, a general contractor and avid outdoorsman, died Friday of cancer at his Sykesville home. He was 74. Mr. Sherman, the son of farmers, was born and raised in London, Ky. He moved to Baltimore in the 1940s with his mother, who came to work in the city's war plants, and attended city public schools. Mr. Sherman had worked in the construction industry for years and was the owner and operator of Sherman Builders, a commercial and residential construction company.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Kevin Rector and The Baltimore Sun | September 14, 2014
The officials who are responsible for safeguarding the nation's intelligence secrets are trying to figure out how to better vet millions of employees and contractors with security clearances, after auditors found that some of those workers owed more than three-quarters of a billion dollars in unpaid taxes. About 83,000 employees and contractors at the Department of Defense owed more than $730 million in unpaid taxes, the Government Accountability Office reported last month. Last year, the agency reported that 8,400 executive-branch civilian employees and contractors owed $85 million.
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NEWS
February 9, 1992
Buschman Construction Co. recently was honored with two Contractor of the Year Awards from the Maryland Improvement Contractors Association.Buschman Construction received its award for the Gill project in Marriottsville in the category of "Best Large Addition" and the Wensil project in Elkridge for "Best Kitchen Remodeling."BUILDER CITEDFOR WORKGoodier Builders of Ellicott City was selected by the National Association of Home Builders to receive the gold medal award of excellence in the category of "11-50 Units."
BUSINESS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | September 8, 2014
Annapolis biodefense company PharmAthene Inc. has formed a strategic alliance with a Florida-based federal contractor to collaborate on development of a nerve agent treatment and other products. PharmAthene and Nanotherapeutics Inc. will share their expertise and resources under an agreement, financial details of which they did not disclose. Their first collaboration will be on PharmAthene's medical countermeasure for nerve agent poisoning. Nanotherapeutics, based in Alachua, Fla., has a $359 million, 10-year contract with the Department of Defense to develop and manufacture vaccines and other treatments.
BUSINESS
By Gus Sentementes and Baltimore Sun reporter | December 6, 2010
I just got word that ManTech International Corp. , a publicly traded defense contractor, is holding a career open house this Friday. It will be held at the BWI Airport Marriott , from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. The company, which provides technology and services for national security programs, is seeking to fill more than 400 open positions that require various levels of security clearances. The new positions are for locations in the Baltimore-Washington area, including a new facility that's opening in Aberdeen in March.
NEWS
July 10, 2011
I was appalled to learn recently how the three young children of my neighbors on Henrietta Street in Federal Hill were put at risk of lead poisoning. The law allows only contractors who are certified to remove lead-based paint. In this renovation, a certified contractor won a contract for the paint removal and then scooted around the EPA requirement by subcontracting the work. The subcontractor was not certified, and indeed failed to take the required precautions. Lead-based paint dust and debris were spread over the property and neighboring properties.
BUSINESS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | September 8, 2014
Annapolis biodefense company PharmAthene Inc. has formed a strategic alliance with a Florida-based federal contractor to collaborate on development of a nerve agent treatment and other products. PharmAthene and Nanotherapeutics Inc. will share their expertise and resources under an agreement, financial details of which they did not disclose. Their first collaboration will be on PharmAthene's medical countermeasure for nerve agent poisoning. Nanotherapeutics, based in Alachua, Fla., has a $359 million, 10-year contract with the Department of Defense to develop and manufacture vaccines and other treatments.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | May 21, 2012
A Circuit Court judge has ruled against a contractor who claimed Baltimore County owed the company $1.4 million in a dispute over construction of the County Detention Center. Judge Judith C. Ensor rejected the appeal from George Moehrle Masonry Inc., a company based in Frederick, and affirmed the decision of a county hearing officer, who had awarded the company $72,603. According to a statement from the county, Moehrle had a $3 million contract for work to be performed in 2004 and 2005.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | October 12, 2010
City Council President Bernard C. "Jack" Young's office violated city policy by using the services of a computer contractor hired by the Department of Transportation without negotiating a separate contract, according to a report this week by the city's inspector general. According to inspector general David N. McClintock, Young's chief of staff asked transportation officials if the computer contractor could work on the council's website shortly after Young took office in February. The chief of staff, William Driscoll, worked for the transportation department prior to joining Young's staff.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | February 2, 2014
The company that ran Baltimore's problematic speed cameras in 2012 will not retain its contract for billing ambulances fee in Anne Arundel County after an audit discovered multiple problems. The county requested an audit of Xerox State and Local Solutions after a Fire Department employee discovered discrepancies in ambulance bills. Officials said the audit from J.H. Henry Consulting of Pittsburgh found billing errors, including a failure to collect hundreds of thousands of dollars' worth of ambulance fees because employees were unaware of medical coding regulations.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | September 5, 2014
The state ethics board is reviewing one of the firms bidding to build and operate the Purple Line after the engineering company was acquired by another MTA contractor. Engineering design firm AECOM, which in 2011 was awarded an 8-year, $60-million contract with the MTA to oversee the Purple Line and the proposed Red Line in Baltimore, among other projects, announced in July that it had reached an agreement to acquire engineering and construction firm URS Corp. URS Corp. is the lead design company for a group known as the Maryland Purple Line Partners, one of four groups that have been short-listed by the state to submit proposals for what will be a public-private partnership with the state to build the transit line linking Montgomery and Prince George's counties.
HEALTH
By John Fritze and Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | August 26, 2014
Federal auditors looking into Maryland's flawed health insurance exchange are subpoenaing documents as part of their probe and have sought information from the lead contractor hired by the state to build the site. North Dakota-based Noridian Healthcare Solutions, the former prime contractor with a multimillion-dollar deal to design Maryland's online insurance marketplace, received a request for documents related to the project from the inspector general of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services on July 30, the company's president said Tuesday.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | August 23, 2014
Maryland health exchange officials have been saying for months that everything is on track for a smooth launch of their new website, where residents can buy insurance under the Affordable Care Act. The thousands who had trouble enrolling on the last dysfunctional website may be skeptical, but they have no choice but to take the officials' word for it. Exchange officials have declined to release a new audit of their preparation, despite requests from...
NEWS
By Doug Donovan, The Baltimore Sun | August 8, 2014
Maryland's health department has alerted state contractors caring for disabled adults and children that they are obligated to report incidents at their facilities that involve police, fire and medical assistance. The advisory - which comes as broader safeguards are being proposed by child advocates - was sent this week to nearly 300 professionals who work with disabled clients. Regulators said it was spurred by a recent Baltimore Sun investigation of an Anne Arundel County group home operator, LifeLine, which failed to notify regulators about numerous reports alleging abuse and neglect by its staff.
NEWS
By E.R. Shipp | August 3, 2014
If you are black and have done business with the city or the state - or have even thought of it - you probably know the name Arnold Jolivet. If you are a politician who has anything at all to do with granting government contracts, you definitely know that name. People like me, on the other hand, who go about our lives without giving a thought about procurement processes, probably know nothing of the man that a city official, a construction contractor and a staunch critic of city government admiringly described to me as a warrior.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | July 28, 2014
Arnold M. Jolivet, a longtime advocate for minority- and women-owned businesses who was a familiar presence at City Hall, died of complications from heart disease Sunday morning at Sinai Hospital. The Village of Cross Keys resident was 71. "Mr. Jolivet was a consistent, devoted and vocal champion for minority businesses," Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake said in a statement. "His unapologetic approach to overcoming obstacles will always be his legacy. He understood, as I do, that progress cannot be achieved without economic parity for minority-owned businesses.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 29, 2012
Lawrence P. "L.P. " Martin, a Catonsville contractor, died June 21 of a heart attack at St. Agnes Hospital. He was 55. Lawrence Phillip Martin was born in Catonsville and raised in the community's Paradise neighborhood. He was a graduate of Catonsville High School and what is now the Catonsville campus of the Community College of Baltimore County. He worked in the automotive department of Montgomery Ward before taking a construction job with Cearfoss Construction Co., where he worked for a decade before establishing L.P. Martin Contracting in the early 1990s.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | January 29, 2012
Robert James Mitchell, a retired Baltimore County building contractor and a one-time trainer for the Army's 82nd Airborne Division, died Wednesday of a cerebral hemorrhage at his home, "Dogwoods," in Glen Arm. He was 81. Aside from a stint at Fort Benning, Ga., Mr. Mitchell spent his whole life in Maryland. Born in the Forest Park section of West Baltimore. Mr. Mitchell was the son of Robert John Mitchell and Leona Edna Brooks. His mother was a descendant of John West, a member of the Virginia House of Burgesses, the first government of English colonists in North America.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 13, 2014
John H. Zink Jr., a retired mechanical engineer and contractor who enjoyed playing gin rummy going to the beach, died July 3 of an apparent heart attack. He was 95. Mr. Zink was lunching and playing cards with friends at the Green Spring Club when he was stricken with a heart attack. He was taken to Northwest Hospital, where he was pronounced dead, family members said. The son of John Henry Zink, founder of the Heat & Power Corp., and Isabelle Greer Seipp Zink, a homemaker, John Henry Zink Jr. was born in Baltimore and raised at Mayfair, his family's farm, which is now the site of the Mays Chapel community in Timonium.
FEATURES
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | June 13, 2014
Home improvement projects can easily cost tens of thousands of dollars, which means the stakes are high if something goes wrong. And things do. Maryland regulators received more than 4,400 complaints about home improvement contractors in the last three fiscal years, ranging from disputes about the scope of the project to no work performed at all. The Maryland Home Improvement Commission, which offers a program where homeowners can be reimbursed some...
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