Advertisement
HomeCollectionsContracted Aids
IN THE NEWS

Contracted Aids

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Fort Lauderdale Sun-Sentinel | January 23, 1991
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. -- A Fort Pierce, Fla., woman who is the first person ever to claim that she contracted AIDS from a dentist has won a $1 million settlement from the late dentist's insurance company.Kim Bergalis, 22, got the award yesterday from CNA Insurance Co., which wrote Dr. David Acer's $1 million dental malpractice insurance policy. The settlement came a day before the company's time had expired to contest Bergalis' claims that she contracted AIDS from Acer when he removed her wisdom teeth in December 1987.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Gady A. Epstein and Gady A. Epstein,SUN STAFF | April 13, 2001
City Council President Sheila Dixon said yesterday that she should have sought competitive bids for a contract to manage the City Council's computer system rather than hire a friend and campaign aide to do the job for $95 per hour. "I was wrong. I should have put it out for bid," Dixon said of the computer contract, which she gave to Dale G. Clark in a deal struck in February last year and approved by the city Board of Estimates. Clark's small Baltimore-based company, Ultimate Network Integration, has earned $101,000 in 12 months under the deal, according to records supplied by Dixon's office.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Jean Marbella | December 3, 1990
Dozens of patients who had been operated on by Dr. Rudolph Almaraz called Johns Hopkins Hospital yesterday in response to revelations that the breast cancer surgeon died of AIDS.By midafternoon yesterday, after The Sun reported that the 41-year-old doctor died of acquired immune deficiency syndrome two weeks ago, about 50 people had called the hospital, said Dr. Timothy Townsend, an epidemiologist and senior director for medical affairs at Hopkins. Operators told callers to contact Dr. Townsend at his office today.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | June 28, 1999
A Connecticut-based company will provide support to Maryland and six other applicants studying whether a magnetic levitation train would work in their areas. U.S. Secretary of Transportation Rodney Slater announced Friday that MK Centennial, based in Hamden, Conn., has been awarded the federal contract to provide engineering services, professional staff and other assistance to Maryland, Pittsburgh, New Orleans, Atlanta, Las Vegas, Los Angeles and Port Canaveral, Fla. The contract amount was not immediately available.
NEWS
May 23, 1991
The death of two organ transplant recipients from AIDS is a clear reminder of the insidious nature of this human immunodeficiency virus. The donor, a 22-year-old Virginia man, was shot to death during a robbery in 1985. Doctors who recommended using his organs to help other people live had no way of knowing the murder victim had contracted AIDS, because his tissues reportedly tested negative for the virus.That didn't tell the whole story, it turns out. The man apparently contracted the disease shortly before he was killed.
NEWS
By Randy Shilts | December 20, 1991
ANYONE who has a heart can sympathize with the anguish of the Bergalis family over the recent death of their daughter Kimberly.Like so many other victims of AIDS, Kimberly died too young.No AIDS sufferer in the United States dominated the AIDS policy debate this year the way Bergalis did. But the story of Bergalis and her family became largely a tale of anger.The Bergalises are angry that their daughter was infected with this horrible virus. I understand that. I'm angry too that I've had to watch half of my friends waste away and die miserable deaths from this disease.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | January 17, 1992
WASHINGTON -- While male homosexuals still account for the majority of AIDS cases, the disease is spreading most rapidly among heterosexuals, the government reported yesterday.More than 206,000 Americans have contracted AIDS since 1981, including an estimated 133,000 AIDS patients who have died, according to the Centers for Disease Control in Atlanta.And the pace of AIDS diagnoses is accelerating rapidly. The first 100,000 cases in the United States were diagnosed over nearly eight years; the second 100,000 cases came in two years, between September 1989 and November 1991.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | December 5, 1990
Twenty years ago, there was a great deal of poetry being written to protest the Vietnam War. Some of it was good, but a lot of it wasn't. That doesn't mean, however, that the poetry that wasn't so good should never have been written. It certainly didn't hurt, and it probably helped.Those thoughts are occasioned by two shows that opened on Saturday in celebration of "Day Without Art 1990": "Visual AIDS" (through Dec. 22), sponsored by the Museum for Contemporary Arts/Maryland Institute at the Famous Ballroom, 1717 N. Charles St., and, two doors away at 1713, the BAUhouse's "AIDS=AID" (through Jan. 11)
NEWS
By Anna Quindlen | November 12, 1991
THE LAST time we heard so much about a smile was when those ridiculous buttons surfaced a decade ago, the ones with the happy face and the legend "Have a nice day."Those were phony; Magic Johnson's smile is real, a grin that says feelgood as surely as the rest of him says basketball.Some basketball players, because of their height and a certain hauteur, seem to demand genuflection. Magic Johnson always looks to me like a guy you should hug.That was especially true when he told the world he was infected with the AIDS virus, said he was going to become a national spokesman and flashed the grin.
SPORTS
By Alan Greenberg and Alan Greenberg,The Hartford Courant | February 8, 1993
Unique is one of the most misused and overused words in the English language, but this is what was unique about Arthur Ashe: Although he harbored and expressed strong opinions on some of the vital issues of our world, he was liked and respected by all.Think of the other most-beloved public figures you know. Where did they stand on the AIDS issue, on the plight of Haitian refugees, on apartheid in South Africa? Usually, they stood quietly on the sideline, careful not to express a strong opinion for fear of offending part of their vast constituency.
SPORTS
By Gary Lambrecht and Gary Lambrecht,SUN STAFF | January 28, 1999
Matt Cavanaugh came to Baltimore, saw the Ravens and left town yesterday without signing a contract.By this morning, Ravens coach Brian Billick expects to know whether Cavanaugh will become his offensive coordinator.Cavanaugh, who has been offered the same job with the Jacksonville Jaguars, spent most of yesterday talking with Billick at the team's Owings Mills facility. Cavanaugh's wife, Nancy, also took a look at the city."I like what I'm feeling about this place," said Cavanaugh, 42, who recently was fired as the of fensive coordinator/quarterbacks coach of the Chicago Bears.
SPORTS
By Mike Preston and Mike Preston,SUN STAFF | March 9, 1997
Ravens quarterback Vinny Testaverde agreed yesterday to terms of a new four-year contract worth $19 million, increasing the chance that the 10-year veteran will end his career in Baltimore.Michael Azzarelli, Testaverde's agent, confirmed the Ravens had restructured the final three years of Testaverde's old contract to a new four-year deal that will pay him as much as $8 million over the next two seasons, including a $2.5 million signing bonus.Testaverde, 33, will make $1.5 million in base salary for 1997, $4 million in 1998 ($1.5 million guaranteed)
NEWS
By Ronnie Greene and Ronnie Greene,SUN STAFF | October 23, 1996
Concerned about the number of no-bid contracts in Baltimore County, Councilman T. Bryan McIntire called yesterday for a thorough review of all taxpayer-funded work awarded without competitive bidding.Prompted by a Sun article, McIntire called for the review even as County Executive C. A. Dutch Ruppersberger's aides said they could justify almost every one of the 260 no-bid contracts.To make the case, Ruppersberger's staff filed memos to the County Council saying the county had no discretion in awarding at least $13.1 million of the $17.7 million in contracts.
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,Sun Staff Writer | July 28, 1995
Charleston, W.Va. -- When Pat and Fred Grounds moved into their new home a woman who lives down the street took over zucchini and butternut squash from her garden.But one of their next door neighbors put up a 12-foot privacy fence.The young couple across the way invited them to use the backyard pool anytime they wanted.And the postman refused to deliver their mail.Pat and Fred have full-blown AIDS. They trace their disease to treatments Fred received here in the early 1980s for his hemophilia.
SPORTS
By Alan Greenberg and Alan Greenberg,The Hartford Courant | February 8, 1993
Unique is one of the most misused and overused words in the English language, but this is what was unique about Arthur Ashe: Although he harbored and expressed strong opinions on some of the vital issues of our world, he was liked and respected by all.Think of the other most-beloved public figures you know. Where did they stand on the AIDS issue, on the plight of Haitian refugees, on apartheid in South Africa? Usually, they stood quietly on the sideline, careful not to express a strong opinion for fear of offending part of their vast constituency.
FEATURES
By Jean Marbella and Jean Marbella,Staff Writer | August 25, 1992
You're not a gay man. You're not an intravenous drug abuser. You're a woman who doesn't sleep around or do drugs. Why should you worry about getting AIDS?"
NEWS
By Meredith Schlow and Meredith Schlow,Evening Sun Staff | January 8, 1992
The eighth-grade students sitting on the floor of the commons room at Ruxton Country Middle School look as if they may be thinking they are too old to enjoy a puppet show.Recognizing what could be a tough audience, Willie Charpentier, prevention coordinator for the Baltimore County Office of Substance Abuse, asks the 13- and 14-year-olds to "take off the hat that says, 'I'm cool,' . . . and put on a hat of curiosity."Then she introduces the puppets, whose dialogue is a quick course about AIDS.
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,Sun Staff Writer | July 28, 1995
Charleston, W.Va. -- When Pat and Fred Grounds moved into their new home a woman who lives down the street took over zucchini and butternut squash from her garden.But one of their next door neighbors put up a 12-foot privacy fence.The young couple across the way invited them to use the backyard pool anytime they wanted.And the postman refused to deliver their mail.Pat and Fred have full-blown AIDS. They trace their disease to treatments Fred received here in the early 1980s for his hemophilia.
NEWS
By Marina Sarris and Marina Sarris,Annapolis Bureau | July 21, 1992
ANNAPOLIS -- The Maryland Republican Party has asked for an ethics investigation into Transportation Secretary O. James Lighthizer's role in awarding a "no-bid" state contract to a consulting firm owned by the wife of a former aide.A firm owned by the wife of Francis J. "Zeke" Zylwitis, who worked for Mr. Lighthizer when the secretary was Anne Arundel County executive, received a $35,200 contract from the state without going through competitive bidding procedures.The May 12 contract calls on Davidsonville-based MI Associates to review security at the Transportation Department.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | January 17, 1992
WASHINGTON -- While male homosexuals still account for the majority of AIDS cases, the disease is spreading most rapidly among heterosexuals, the government reported yesterday.More than 206,000 Americans have contracted AIDS since 1981, including an estimated 133,000 AIDS patients who have died, according to the Centers for Disease Control in Atlanta.And the pace of AIDS diagnoses is accelerating rapidly. The first 100,000 cases in the United States were diagnosed over nearly eight years; the second 100,000 cases came in two years, between September 1989 and November 1991.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.