Advertisement
HomeCollectionsContract Workers
IN THE NEWS

Contract Workers

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
By TOM PETERS | February 22, 1993
Simstar Inc. President David Reim is "an entrepreneur of the '90s," writes journalist Steve Kaufman in the San Jose Mercury News. "Working with four Macintoshes in the bedroom of his Sunnyvale [Calif.] apartment, he is building a company that makes interactive multimedia software for health care patients."As the company's only employee, he teams up with independent partners. "I simply view myself as a general contractor who manages his subcontractors over a computer network," he told Kaufman.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | April 9, 2014
The FBI is investigating a former University of Maryland contract worker who said he took College Park administrators' personal information from the campus network and posted online about the stunt to draw attention to major security flaws. David Helkowski said in an interview with The Baltimore Sun that he noticed vulnerabilities months before a February attack exposed nearly 300,000 sensitive records. Frustrated that issues continued even after he raised concerns while working on a university website, Helkowski said, he took the data to raise alarm.
Advertisement
NEWS
February 19, 1996
IT IS TROUBLING to see 170 employees of Broadway Services Inc. still denied the wage increase the city promised contracted service workers more than a year ago. After all, that company supported the city's decision to improve the floor wage paid to janitors, cafeteria workers and others who are employed by private companies to work at city buildings.Broadway Services president Tom McGowan even predicted some companies might not pass on their increased labor costs to the city because they would want to remain competitive in bidding for city work.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | March 25, 2014
The head of the Mayor's Office of Information Technology has been placed on paid leave indefinitely as Baltimore's inspector general investigates allegations that the department made payments to contractual employees for work they may not have performed, city officials confirmed Tuesday. Chris Tonjes, the mayor's chief of information technology, was ordered Monday to take administrative leave for the duration of the investigation, said Kevin Harris, a spokesman for Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake.
BUSINESS
June 22, 1997
Hot jobs: Cornell University School of Hotel Administration reports that 99 percent of its graduating seniors last month will walk into full-time jobs. That stacks up against national averages that 74 percent of bachelor's degree candidates will have a job within a year and 83 percent of business school grads will land full-time jobs. Cornell reports average starting salaries of $30,000, plus signing bonuses.Hot fingers: Employees will swipe $400 billion worth of goods and services from American companies this year, predicts the Association of Certified Fraud Examiners in Waltham, Mass.
BUSINESS
January 20, 1992
Training still vitalDespite the recession, training and development remain as important strategies for corporations that want to be competitive.That's why U.S. businesses spend $210 billion annually in employer-based training -- and intend to keep doing so."The new economy has profound implications for the way we use people on the job," writes economist Anthony Patrick Carnevale in his book, "America and the New Economy: How New Competitive Standards are Radically Changing American Workplaces" (Jossey-Bass, $29.95)
NEWS
By Liz Bowie and Liz Bowie,SUN STAFF | February 25, 1998
The Baltimore school board agreed last night to pay about 2,000 nonunion school employees $7.70 per hour as of July 1 and give them the opportunity to obtain health benefits.The agreement, pushed by the Baltimoreans United in Leadership Development, means the school board is complying with a 1994 city law that gives city contract workers a "living wage" -- one that is well over the minimum wage of $5.15.The group of workers most helped by the agreement are food service workers and bus attendants, who work about 20 hours a week and receive no benefits.
BUSINESS
By JIM MATEJA AND RICK POPELY and JIM MATEJA AND RICK POPELY,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | March 25, 2006
General Motors Corp., reeling from $10.6 billion in losses last year, will fire hundreds of its U.S. salaried employees starting next week, according to people familiar with the plan. GM's engineering staff has been told all leaves have been canceled. They have been ordered to report for work Tuesday morning - what employees already are calling "Black Tuesday" - with company cars and keys. GM wouldn't comment on Tuesday's meeting, but insiders said only the engineering staff is affected - for now. The firings will be followed by another round in April, according to at least three GM people with direct knowledge of the plan who declined to be identified because it hasn't been made public.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie and Liz Bowie,SUN STAFF | February 25, 1998
The Baltimore school board agreed last night to pay about 2,000 nonunion school employees $7.70 an hour as of July 1 and give them the opportunity to obtain health benefits.The agreement, pushed by Baltimoreans United in Leadership Development, means the school board is complying with a 1994 city law that gives city contract workers a "living wage" -- one well over the minimum wage of $5.15.The group of workers most helped by the agreement are food-service workers and bus attendants, who work about 20 hours a week and receive no benefits.
BUSINESS
By Kristine Henry and Kristine Henry,SUN STAFF | September 18, 1999
Baltimore Marine Industries Inc. said yesterday that it has won several contracts that will bring the shipyard more than $9 million in new work.The contracts are one more step in BMI's ascent since it was created out of the former BethShip. Bethlehem Steel sold the shipyard to a New York-based merchant banking fund in 1997.Since then, BMI has boosted employment from 25 to 750 -- about 50 more than BethShip had when it was put up for sale -- and 150 contract workers. The turnaround has come with help from workers, who agreed to a 75-cent hourly wage cut, to $12.75, in return for profit-sharing.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper and Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | March 18, 2014
Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake said Tuesday that she has ordered an investigation into the administration's information technology department, saying the city has received allegations that contractual employees have been paid for work they did not perform. "There have been very serious allegations of fraud and abuse leveled against the office, and we will get to the bottom of it," the mayor said. "I want to know if any of these allegations are true. " Rawlings-Blake said she directed city Inspector General Robert H. Pearre Jr. to lead the investigation of the Mayor's Office of Information Technology.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | November 13, 2013
A man who stole personal data of thousands of Baltimore County employees while working as a information technology contract worker was identified Wednesday after being extradited from Florida. Baltimore County police said Courtney Calbert, 34, of Dundalk made off with employees' banking information, Social Security numbers, and other personal information when he worked for a county contractor between December 2011 and July 2012. County officials have said more than 12,000 current and former county workers are affected.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | March 21, 2013
The Senate Finance Committee voted unanimously Thursday for a proposed law that would require state licensing of medical staffing companies after a radiographer was accused of exposing hundreds of Marylanders to hepatitis C. In a telephone call after the vote, Sen. Thomas Middleton, a Charles County Democrat, said that chances are high it will pass the full Senate as well, given the case of David Kwiatkowski, who allegedly stole syringes of drugs...
BUSINESS
October 25, 2008
Corporate service center for XLHealth to open XLHealth, owner of a Medicare health plan for people with chronic conditions, will create a corporate service center in Montgomery Park Business Center in Southwest Baltimore, the company said yesterday. It will employ more than 150 workers. The company owns Care Improvement Plus and is based in the Warehouse at Camden Yards in downtown Baltimore. The service center will house eight departments that provide service to members and health provides, including call centers.
BUSINESS
By JIM MATEJA AND RICK POPELY and JIM MATEJA AND RICK POPELY,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | March 25, 2006
General Motors Corp., reeling from $10.6 billion in losses last year, will fire hundreds of its U.S. salaried employees starting next week, according to people familiar with the plan. GM's engineering staff has been told all leaves have been canceled. They have been ordered to report for work Tuesday morning - what employees already are calling "Black Tuesday" - with company cars and keys. GM wouldn't comment on Tuesday's meeting, but insiders said only the engineering staff is affected - for now. The firings will be followed by another round in April, according to at least three GM people with direct knowledge of the plan who declined to be identified because it hasn't been made public.
NEWS
February 15, 2005
THE STATE'S new budget for the Department of Juvenile Services has set the agency up for more failure. It reads like Year Two of a reform blueprint that hasn't yet had a Year One. This year's crop of children - and more - could thus be left in the lurch. The General Assembly should insist on a more practical approach, one that ensures adequate facilities remain in place while the department works to improve care in the future. It would mean a real increase in funding, as Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. has pledged, not a reverse bait and switch.
NEWS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,Staff Writer | April 17, 1993
It was "Black Friday" for hundreds of Anne Arundel County workers who got pink slips yesterday as part of County Executive Robert R. Neall's plan to shrink county government.Department heads distributed 372 letters to contractual employees, workers whose positions will be cut and those in danger of being bumped from a job by someone with more seniority.Mr. Neall announced Wednesday that he will cut 440 positions, including 120 vacant slots, effective June 30 as part of a government reorganization plan to save $5 million.
NEWS
By Jean Thompson and Jean Thompson,SUN STAFF | November 15, 1995
School bus drivers and aides met at a rain-soaked rail crossing in West Baltimore yesterday to draw attention to the hazards of their jobs and to call on their employers and city agencies to improve their wages and work conditions.Citing their responsibility for the safety of thousands of city children each day, the drivers announced plans to survey their ranks to identify 25 Baltimore roadway "danger zones and deathtraps."They plan to lobby city officials -- and the private bus companies that hired them -- to step up traffic law enforcement, improve safety at crossings and stops, and change the routes they consider most treacherous.
NEWS
By Athima Chansanchai and Athima Chansanchai,SUN STAFF | January 20, 2005
One worker lost the tip of a right finger and another fractured a leg and ankle in two separate industrial accidents that occurred within three hours yesterday at Lehigh Cement Co. in Union Bridge, authorities said. The workers were out-of-state contracted employees performing scheduled maintenance when they were injured, company officials said. "This is pretty unusual," said Brian Forsythe, production manager at the plant. He said he couldn't recall an accident in the two years he'd been there.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.