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By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | October 5, 2011
University of Maryland women's basketball coach Brenda Frese said she was heartbroken that a chemotherapy drug used to treat her 3-year-old son, Tyler, for leukemia was in short supply and possibly unavailable. When she discovered that some companies have been accused of putting profit over production or distribution of cytarabine and other drugs, she was angry — and she began writing letters. "This is life or death, and the thought of some drugs being put out of reach made my stomach sick," she said in an interview.
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NEWS
By Jonathan Lesser | March 25, 2014
The Maryland Public Service Commission (PSC) currently has an opportunity to ensure that Maryland consumers are not on the hook to pay for hundreds of millions of dollars in subsidized electricity that will be generated at Competitive Power Ventures' (CPV) St. Charles facility. The PSC should act in the best interest of Maryland consumers and repeal the subsidies. In 2011, power plant developers convinced the Maryland PSC, as well as their counterparts in New Jersey, to require the two states' respective electric utilities to enter into long-term contracts that would provide billions of dollars in subsidies to build new power plants.
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BUSINESS
By KEN HARNEY | September 23, 2007
What's going on with appraisals in some parts of the country? Mortgage lenders -- and appraisers themselves -- say they're increasingly coming in with valuations higher than the contract prices agreed to by sellers and buyers. The differences can range into the thousands of dollars. Are some sellers giving in to lowball offers, fearful that they can do no better in the wake of the subprime mortgage implosion and home sale bust? Or are appraisers simply lagging behind downward market adjustments?
BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar and The Baltimore Sun | November 1, 2012
Unlicensed home improvement contractors will undoubtedly be trying to take advantage “of distraught homeowners anxious to complete repairs as soon as possible,” Maryland's Labor and Licensing Department said the day after the storm called Sandy blew through the state. “Scam artists often follow damaging storms. Don't be fooled by an unlicensed contractor who offers to do a job at a lower price than a licensed contractor,” said Leonard Howie, secretary of Maryland's Department of Labor, Licensing and Regulation, in a statement Wednesday.
BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar and The Baltimore Sun | November 1, 2012
Unlicensed home improvement contractors will undoubtedly be trying to take advantage “of distraught homeowners anxious to complete repairs as soon as possible,” Maryland's Labor and Licensing Department said the day after the storm called Sandy blew through the state. “Scam artists often follow damaging storms. Don't be fooled by an unlicensed contractor who offers to do a job at a lower price than a licensed contractor,” said Leonard Howie, secretary of Maryland's Department of Labor, Licensing and Regulation, in a statement Wednesday.
NEWS
By Jonathan Lesser | March 25, 2014
The Maryland Public Service Commission (PSC) currently has an opportunity to ensure that Maryland consumers are not on the hook to pay for hundreds of millions of dollars in subsidized electricity that will be generated at Competitive Power Ventures' (CPV) St. Charles facility. The PSC should act in the best interest of Maryland consumers and repeal the subsidies. In 2011, power plant developers convinced the Maryland PSC, as well as their counterparts in New Jersey, to require the two states' respective electric utilities to enter into long-term contracts that would provide billions of dollars in subsidies to build new power plants.
NEWS
By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | March 3, 2011
Howard County's trash disposal honeymoon is nearing an end — which likely means higher fees for residents — but public employee pensions are sound, county officials told a citizens committee studying levels of spending and borrowing for the next fiscal year. County budget director Raymond S. Wacks wanted the group, which met at the George Howard Building on Wednesday morning, to review opportunities, like the influx of federal defense-related jobs in and around Fort Meade, and potential challenges, like the cost of trash disposal and employee pensions.
BUSINESS
March 28, 2004
When a homebuyer needs financing insured by the Federal Housing Administration or the Department of Veterans Affairs, the real estate sales contract must include an addendum that gives the buyer rights and obligates the seller for additional costs. The seller's real estate broker should explain the FHA/VA addendum so that the seller knows what to expect. Typically, the buyer is not obligated to buy the property if the sales price exceeds the value established from an appraisal. If the property is not appraised at the sales price, the buyer may cancel the contract and have his deposit money returned or can complete the sale without regard to the amount of the appraised valuation.
NEWS
By Donna E. Boller and Donna E. Boller,Staff Writer | March 21, 1993
Westminster Mayor W. Benjamin Brown and City Council President William F. Haifley say they have dropped the brick issue for the new police headquarters and don't plan to raise it again.The two elected officials have opposed a March 8 council decision to overlay the new Westminster police headquarters with white brick rather than red.Staff research ordered by Mr. Haifley and Mr. Brown showed that white brick would cost about $150 more than comparable red brick, a difference of $5 per 1,000 bricks.
BUSINESS
February 29, 2004
When a seller wrongfully refuses to settle as required by his real estate contract, the buyer has a choice of remedies. The buyer can sue for monetary damages to recover the money he has lost on the transaction. Or he can sue for specific performance to have a court order the seller to settle for the property and for damages caused by the delay in obtaining performance of the contract. Which remedy the buyer chooses depends on the circumstances. It often takes months or even years for a specific performance action to be tried in court.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | October 5, 2011
University of Maryland women's basketball coach Brenda Frese said she was heartbroken that a chemotherapy drug used to treat her 3-year-old son, Tyler, for leukemia was in short supply and possibly unavailable. When she discovered that some companies have been accused of putting profit over production or distribution of cytarabine and other drugs, she was angry — and she began writing letters. "This is life or death, and the thought of some drugs being put out of reach made my stomach sick," she said in an interview.
NEWS
By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | March 3, 2011
Howard County's trash disposal honeymoon is nearing an end — which likely means higher fees for residents — but public employee pensions are sound, county officials told a citizens committee studying levels of spending and borrowing for the next fiscal year. County budget director Raymond S. Wacks wanted the group, which met at the George Howard Building on Wednesday morning, to review opportunities, like the influx of federal defense-related jobs in and around Fort Meade, and potential challenges, like the cost of trash disposal and employee pensions.
BUSINESS
By KEN HARNEY | September 23, 2007
What's going on with appraisals in some parts of the country? Mortgage lenders -- and appraisers themselves -- say they're increasingly coming in with valuations higher than the contract prices agreed to by sellers and buyers. The differences can range into the thousands of dollars. Are some sellers giving in to lowball offers, fearful that they can do no better in the wake of the subprime mortgage implosion and home sale bust? Or are appraisers simply lagging behind downward market adjustments?
NEWS
October 19, 2000
OVER THE YEARS, Baltimore City officials have come to consider Roberto Marsili a pain in the neck. And they may be right. The retired stonemason is so persistent as to be irritating. And he gets downright livid whenever anyone challenges him about his stock in trade -- dirt, rocks and concrete. Two years ago, when Phipps Construction beat out three other companies for a demolition job in Mr. Marsili's native Little Italy, it did not take long for the activist to blow the whistle. The job was being done all wrong, he insisted.
BUSINESS
By Bloomberg News | January 23, 2009
The Chicago Cubs baseball franchise sued Baltimore-based Under Armour Inc. yesterday, contending that the sports apparel maker reneged on a promised $10.8 million, five-year sponsorship agreement after its profits declined. In a complaint filed in U.S. District Court in Chicago, the ballclub said the garment maker agreed to the deal and is still using Cubs players and the team's stadium, Wrigley Field, in advertisements for its products. Under Armour told the Cubs in a Dec. 12 letter that it would not sponsor them for the next season and "would not meet any of its obligations under the agreement," according to the team's complaint, which seeks full payment of the contract price.
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