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AN EDITORIAL FROM THE AEGIS | June 23, 2011
The likelihood of a negotiating impasse between Harford County Public Schools and the local teachers union will no doubt drag out further any final contract settlement between the two sides. The stalemate may also eventually trigger a test of the state's new binding arbitration law for teacher negotiations, but we're still a fur piece from that unfortunate occurrence. We do know the teachers were promised a 3 percent raise, a step increment raise for next year and another one to catch up from the one missed in the current year as salaries were frozen.
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NEWS
By Kevin Rector and The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2014
The International Longshoremen's Association is investigating the largest dockworker union at the port of Baltimore over racially tinged allegations that local leaders stacked its membership in advance of coming local elections. Two members of the ILA executive council convened meetings in Baltimore this week to investigate the grievances filed by members of Baltimore's Local 333, confirmed Jim McNamara, a national ILA spokesman. The hearings occurred as two senior ILA officials, including Atlantic Coast District President Dennis Daggett, met in Baltimore this week with representatives of the Steamship Trade Association of Baltimore and the United States Maritime Association, or USMX, to continue local contract negotiations for Local 333. The two associations represent port shippers that employ ILA labor.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2014
All across the globe, worried Metropolitan Opera fans, not to mention assorted pundits and politicians, are caught up in the suspense of the company's testy contract negotiations with its many unions. Last night's late-hour reprieve -- management agreed to extend talks for 72-hours, rather than impose a lockout at midnight -- has only revved up the anxiety even more. To provide an appropriate soundtrack for these tense times, I offer one of the greatest examples of musical tension in all of opera, Siegmund's extended cry of "Walse!"
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2014
All across the globe, worried Metropolitan Opera fans, not to mention assorted pundits and politicians, are caught up in the suspense of the company's testy contract negotiations with its many unions. Last night's late-hour reprieve -- management agreed to extend talks for 72-hours, rather than impose a lockout at midnight -- has only revved up the anxiety even more. To provide an appropriate soundtrack for these tense times, I offer one of the greatest examples of musical tension in all of opera, Siegmund's extended cry of "Walse!"
NEWS
By Carol L. Bowers and Carol L. Bowers,Staff Writer | May 10, 1993
An arbitrator will begin listening today to the differences between the Board of Education and teachers union that led to an impasse in contract negotiations.This is the second time in three years outside help has been needed to settle issues between the two sides.The $383.4 million school operating budget, recently forwarded to the County Council by County Executive Robert R. Neall, includes money for step or merit increases for employees. Each step amounts to about a 2 percent pay raise, and about 54 percent of the Board of Education's 6,767 employees would qualify to receive them.
NEWS
By Carol L. Bowers and Andrea F. Siegel and Carol L. Bowers and Andrea F. Siegel,Sun Staff Writers | September 15, 1994
After a bitter summer that pitted the Anne Arundel County school unions against the school board, the two sides must now learn to trust each other as they begin contract negotiations.The monthslong process, which starts Oct. 5, comes just after relations between the four unions and the school board hit bottom. The unions represent 7,300 employees."In successful negotiations each side must trust the other side," said Jim Pickens, president of Local 1693 of the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees.
NEWS
By Devon Spurgeon and Devon Spurgeon,SUN STAFF | August 18, 1999
Thirty Anne Arundel County police officers are handing out leaflets and organizing meetings to persuade their fellow officers to abandon the Fraternal Order of Police and let the Teamsters represent them in contract negotiations with the county.The effort -- dubbed "Operation Second Chance" -- began this week with organizers placing leaflets singing the praises of the International Brotherhood of Teamsters Local 103 in mailboxes late at night."One of the biggest benefits of the Teamsters is that when an issue surfaces within our bargaining unit, a professional from Local 103 addresses the issue with the Chief, County or press, not a fellow police officer who may be subjected to coercion from management," said the letter signed by the Anne Arundel County Police Officers Teamsters Organizing Committee.
SPORTS
By Joe Strauss and Joe Strauss,SUN STAFF | April 30, 1998
CHICAGO -- Six weeks after assuming control of all contract negotiations with the Orioles' unprecedented number of pending free agents, majority owner Peter Angelos has returned control to assistant general manager Kevin Malone, according to club sources.The move is considered an indication that the club is stepping up efforts to negotiate extensions for pitcher Scott Erickson and left fielder B. J. Surhoff, who both appeared close to agreement earlier this spring.Malone has spoken with Erickson's lead agent, Rick Thurman, several times in the past several days, including yesterday, about a possible five-year deal.
SPORTS
By Mike Preston and Mike Preston,SUN STAFF | September 1, 1999
Ravens defensive end Michael McCrary is expected at practice today, and the team could begin negotiations about a contract extension by this afternoon, according to his agent, Michael George.Ravens officials declined to comment, but George and McCrary both confirmed that the sixth-year player was flying in from Phoenix, Ariz., last night. McCrary left the team Saturday afternoon after contract negotiations broke down Friday following two days of talks.Ravens officials said Monday that negotiations would not resume until McCrary returned to Baltimore.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | November 20, 2013
Giant Food and Safeway workers, who are negotiating with management over a labor contract that expires Dec. 20, plan to picket Thursday outside a new Giant store in northwest Washington. United Food and Commercial Workers Local 400, one of two UFCW locals representing 28,000 Giant and Safeway workers in the Baltimore-Washington area, organized the "informational picket" planned for the grand opening of Giant at 8th and O streets N.W. Local 400 voted last week to authorize union leadership to call a strike against the supermarket chains if the sides fail to reach an agreement before the contract expires.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | June 24, 2014
Service workers at Johns Hopkins Hospital plan to begin a four-day strike at the hospital Friday after contract negotiations with the East Baltimore medical institution broke down. The 1199 SEIU United Healthcare Workers East labor union, which represents 2,000 Hopkins workers, gave the hospital a strike notice last week in case an agreement was not met. The strike would be the second in two months for the union, which held a three-day walkout in April. The two sides, which began negotiations four months ago, reached a stalemate late Monday after a full day of bargaining.
SPORTS
By Jon Meoli and The Baltimore Sun | June 3, 2014
Bud Norris has been in Baltimore for almost a year, but it appears he's kept a keen eye on the goings-on back in Houston. The Orioles right-hander took to Twitter Tuesday morning to tear into the contract extension the Astros signed prospect Jon Singleton to yesterday, and said the deal is "terrible. " Norris added Singleton should have listened to the players union, not his agent. Singleton, who was promoted to the majors Monday, signed a club-friendly extension without ever taking a swing in the big leagues.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | May 1, 2014
The labor union representing service workers at The Johns Hopkins Hospital are planning a march and media blitz to criticize the hospital's labor practices after contract negotiations ordered by a federal mediator broke down late Wednesday. The workers, members of 1199 SEIU United Healthcare Workers East labor union, plan to march in downtown Baltimore May 10. Next week, they will place commercials on Baltimore radio stations and advertisements in national newspapers, including The Wall Street Journal and The New York Times.
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | April 19, 2014
After an investigation that revealed missing money and questionable financial practices, officials of a national longshoremen's union are considering seizing control of a Baltimore chapter — a move that could complicate contract negotiations at the port. According to an internal committee report of the International Longshoremen's Association obtained by The Baltimore Sun, a "trusteeship hearing" in Baltimore found that money was missing from accounts of ILA Local 333. It also found that union debit cards were used for nonunion expenses.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, Meredith Cohn and Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | April 2, 2014
The board overseeing Maryland's health exchange voted unanimously Tuesday evening to scrap its dysfunctional website and adopt software developed by Deloitte Consulting and used by the more successful health exchange in Connecticut. The software is free for Maryland to use but Health Secretary Joshua M. Sharfstein will negotiate an emergency $40 million to $50 million contract with the software company to develop the site. Isabel FitzGerald, secretary of the state's Department of Information Technology, who stepped in to help fix the exchange, will oversee the project.
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | March 1, 2014
The port of Baltimore's continuing labor dispute, which boiled over in a three-day dockworkers strike in October before a three-month "cooling-off" period, now simmers with uncertainty. Labor peace in the port seems precarious. A contract covering the handling of vehicles and other local matters has expired, and workers voted down a new contract. The union says it won't strike and management says it won't lock out the dockworkers. The only certainty is that the port has lost work, and some of it might never return, port officials said.
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | March 1, 2014
The port of Baltimore's continuing labor dispute, which boiled over in a three-day dockworkers strike in October before a three-month "cooling-off" period, now simmers with uncertainty. Labor peace in the port seems precarious. A contract covering the handling of vehicles and other local matters has expired, and workers voted down a new contract. The union says it won't strike and management says it won't lock out the dockworkers. The only certainty is that the port has lost work, and some of it might never return, port officials said.
NEWS
March 10, 1991
The Board of Education, in contract negotiations with the Carroll County Education Association, plans to require all high school physicaleducation teachers hired after July 1991 to coach at least two sports.Do you think the school board should make coaching mandatory for high school phys ed teachers.? Do you think physical education training automatically makes those teachers more qualified to coach?
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | February 3, 2014
Members of a longshoremen's union at odds with port of Baltimore employers will vote next week on whether to accept the employers' "best and final" contract offer. The contract has been on the table for weeks, and union members have disagreed over whether to sign it. The secret ballot vote, scheduled for Feb. 11, has the potential to end an extended stalemate between the International Longshoremen's Association Local 333 and the Steamship Trade Association of Baltimore, which represents employers.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | November 20, 2013
Giant Food and Safeway workers, who are negotiating with management over a labor contract that expires Dec. 20, plan to picket Thursday outside a new Giant store in northwest Washington. United Food and Commercial Workers Local 400, one of two UFCW locals representing 28,000 Giant and Safeway workers in the Baltimore-Washington area, organized the "informational picket" planned for the grand opening of Giant at 8th and O streets N.W. Local 400 voted last week to authorize union leadership to call a strike against the supermarket chains if the sides fail to reach an agreement before the contract expires.
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