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Contract Killer

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By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | July 31, 2012
An alleged Baltimore contract killer who went by the street name "Tony Montana" is in federal custody after authorities say he agreed to execute the associate of an apparent drug dealer — who was actually an undercover FBI agent. Court documents outline a series of meetings between 46-year-old Antonio McKiver and the agent, during which conversations were recorded detailing how McKiver would take out the target in exchange for $15,000 and a kilogram of cocaine. "That ain't no problem," McKiver allegedly said in one conversation, according to court records.
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NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | March 21, 2013
A Baltimore contract killer, who was caught telling an undercover FBI agent that he would murder someone for drugs and cash, pleaded guilty Thursday and was sentenced to more than 19 years in federal prison, the U.S. Attorney's office announced.  "There are other hit men like Antonio McKiver who commit drug-related murders in Baltimore," U.S. Attorney Rod Rosenstein said in a news release. "Our challenge is to catch them before the next murder so we don't need to chase them afterwards.
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NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | March 21, 2013
A Baltimore contract killer, who was caught telling an undercover FBI agent that he would murder someone for drugs and cash, pleaded guilty Thursday and was sentenced to more than 19 years in federal prison, the U.S. Attorney's office announced.  "There are other hit men like Antonio McKiver who commit drug-related murders in Baltimore," U.S. Attorney Rod Rosenstein said in a news release. "Our challenge is to catch them before the next murder so we don't need to chase them afterwards.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | July 31, 2012
An alleged Baltimore contract killer who went by the street name "Tony Montana" is in federal custody after authorities say he agreed to execute the associate of an apparent drug dealer — who was actually an undercover FBI agent. Court documents outline a series of meetings between 46-year-old Antonio McKiver and the agent, during which conversations were recorded detailing how McKiver would take out the target in exchange for $15,000 and a kilogram of cocaine. "That ain't no problem," McKiver allegedly said in one conversation, according to court records.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | July 9, 2012
More and more these days, it seems as if the most interesting TV projects are coming from new and different places. "House of Cards,"  which Netflix is making in Baltimore, leads the parade. But DirecTV is getting in the game, too, and this week debuts a six-part mini-series about a transgendered contract killer played by Chloe Sevigny ("Big Love," "Boys Don't Cry"). "Hit & Miss," which premieres at 10 p.m. Wednesday on DirecTV's Audience Channel is a British import created by Paul Abbott, who is usually praised for "Shameless"and "State of Play.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | February 27, 1998
Lawyers for Ruthann Aron acknowledged yesterday that she hired a hit man to kill her husband and another man, but blamed her actions on childhood sexual abuse, a cheating husband, and a humiliating loss to a political rival."
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach | April 12, 2001
Films about a housewarming party at which a guest reveals his personal relationship with the abominable snowman, and a hyper-kinetic Hong Kong contract killer start John Hopkins Film Fest 2001 tonight at the Charles. The four-day festival, which moves to the Hopkins campus tomorrow, will include more than 125 feature-length films and shorts, from Darren Aronofsky's "Requiem for a Dream" to works from little-known local filmmakers. It all starts tonight at 8 with Scott Barlow's "The Last Late Night," about a dinner party that takes unforeseen turns, and a pair of shorts: "Seraglio," a tale of adultery and cabbage, and "The Hook-Armed Man," in which Jesus works at a gas station.
FEATURES
By Ron Dicker and Ron Dicker,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 8, 2002
CHICAGO -- The air conditioning blasts out the muggy Midwest afternoon, but perspiration still beads on Tom Hanks' face as he settles in for an interview at a downtown hotel. "I'm Michael Corleone back from Havana," he jokes. Hanks, the first actor to win back-to-back Academy Awards since Spencer Tracy, has not had a reason to sweat at the box office in a long time. Every one of his movies since 1992's A League of Their Own has come up dollar signs. His last 10 films have averaged more than $179 million.
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,SUN STAFF Sun staff writers William F. Zorzi Jr., Dennis O'Brien, Tom Pelton, Debbie M. Price and contributing writer Joe Mathews contributed to this article | June 13, 1997
Ruthann Aron, wealthy Potomac businesswoman and one-time U.S. Senate candidate, had found a middleman -- someone who would locate a contract killer she could pay to murder a Baltimore lawyer, according to police charges.The lawyer, she told William H. Mossburg Jr. last week, had caused her trouble in a bitter court case -- a case she had desperately wanted to win to help salvage her political reputation, according to an official familiar with the investigation."I believe in an eye for an eye," she reportedly told Mossburg.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | March 21, 2014
For 14 years, police suspected Stephen Cooke in the death of his girlfriend, a theory stoked by the lucrative life insurance payout he received after her death. It wasn't until hours before another man's trial that police say they finally got what they needed to charge him. Baltimore County police said Friday they had charged Cooke, 43, with ordering a hit on 24-year-old Heidi Bernadzikowski at their Dundalk townhouse. The man accused of killing her told investigators that Cooke paid him and another man to carry out the crime.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | July 9, 2012
More and more these days, it seems as if the most interesting TV projects are coming from new and different places. "House of Cards,"  which Netflix is making in Baltimore, leads the parade. But DirecTV is getting in the game, too, and this week debuts a six-part mini-series about a transgendered contract killer played by Chloe Sevigny ("Big Love," "Boys Don't Cry"). "Hit & Miss," which premieres at 10 p.m. Wednesday on DirecTV's Audience Channel is a British import created by Paul Abbott, who is usually praised for "Shameless"and "State of Play.
FEATURES
By Ron Dicker and Ron Dicker,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 8, 2002
CHICAGO -- The air conditioning blasts out the muggy Midwest afternoon, but perspiration still beads on Tom Hanks' face as he settles in for an interview at a downtown hotel. "I'm Michael Corleone back from Havana," he jokes. Hanks, the first actor to win back-to-back Academy Awards since Spencer Tracy, has not had a reason to sweat at the box office in a long time. Every one of his movies since 1992's A League of Their Own has come up dollar signs. His last 10 films have averaged more than $179 million.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach | April 12, 2001
Films about a housewarming party at which a guest reveals his personal relationship with the abominable snowman, and a hyper-kinetic Hong Kong contract killer start John Hopkins Film Fest 2001 tonight at the Charles. The four-day festival, which moves to the Hopkins campus tomorrow, will include more than 125 feature-length films and shorts, from Darren Aronofsky's "Requiem for a Dream" to works from little-known local filmmakers. It all starts tonight at 8 with Scott Barlow's "The Last Late Night," about a dinner party that takes unforeseen turns, and a pair of shorts: "Seraglio," a tale of adultery and cabbage, and "The Hook-Armed Man," in which Jesus works at a gas station.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | February 27, 1998
Lawyers for Ruthann Aron acknowledged yesterday that she hired a hit man to kill her husband and another man, but blamed her actions on childhood sexual abuse, a cheating husband, and a humiliating loss to a political rival."
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,SUN STAFF Sun staff writers William F. Zorzi Jr., Dennis O'Brien, Tom Pelton, Debbie M. Price and contributing writer Joe Mathews contributed to this article | June 13, 1997
Ruthann Aron, wealthy Potomac businesswoman and one-time U.S. Senate candidate, had found a middleman -- someone who would locate a contract killer she could pay to murder a Baltimore lawyer, according to police charges.The lawyer, she told William H. Mossburg Jr. last week, had caused her trouble in a bitter court case -- a case she had desperately wanted to win to help salvage her political reputation, according to an official familiar with the investigation."I believe in an eye for an eye," she reportedly told Mossburg.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | August 9, 2012
An Annapolis man is facing attempted murder charges in a murder-for-hire scheme in Leesburg, Va. Wendell B. Mansel, 54, was arrested Aug. 3 during a meeting with a Leesburg undercover police officer, who was posing as a hit man. In what was their final meeting, Mansel told the officer he wished to have his wife killed and offered him a partial payment to carry out the hit, police said. He is charged with attempted capital murder, murder-for-hire and soliciting murder-for-hire.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow | December 11, 2009
The Fantastic Mr. Fox . . ( 3 STARS) George Clooney and Meryl Streep give, paws down, their best performances of the year as the voices of the risk-taking fox and his long-suffering wife in Wes Anderson's hugely charming puppet-animated feature, which also features a scene-stealing turn from Bill Murray as Mr. Fox's lawyer, Clive Badger. The movie is unexpected in every way. The stop-motion animation proves hilariously inventive. And the combination of family comedy-drama and caper movie (Mr. Fox, though a journalist, can't resist raiding the larders of neighboring farmers)
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