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NEWS
By Knight-Ridder | December 11, 1990
Norplant, widely hailed as the most revolutionar contraceptive since the birth-control pill, has been approved by the Food and Drug Administration.America's first implantable contraceptive, Norplant works by slowly releasing a synthetic hormone into a woman's body through six thin capsules that are surgically embedded in her upper left arm during a brief office procedure.Left in place for five years or less, the capsules have about a 99 percent success rate in preventing pregnancy, studies have shown -- making Norplant more effective than any birth-control pill or intrauterine device currently on the market and as effective as surgical sterilization.
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NEWS
September 14, 2014
In what on the surface seems like a remarkable turnaround, a number of conservative Republican Senate candidates this year are supporting a proposal to expand access to birth control by making it available without a prescription as an over-the-counter medication. Wider access to birth control traditionally has been a Democratic issue, so Republicans' sudden embrace of it seems almost too good to be true. Unfortunately, it is. This year four GOP Senate candidates in close races against Democratic incumbents have announced their support for over-the-counter access to birth control: Cory Gardener of Colorado; Thom Tillis of North Carolina; Ed Gillespie of Virgina and Mike McFadden of Minnesota.
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NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and JoAnna Daemmrich,Staff writer | June 11, 1991
An Anne Arundel medical team is training doctors and nurses from across the state to properly administer the new Norplant birth control device at public health clinics.Dr. Leland Spencer and Sandra Reinhard, who run the county Health Department's family planning services, are teaching public health workers and some private physicians about the contraceptive method, which was approved just six months ago.State health officials, who want to make the birth control optionwidely available, chose the county as a training site in part because Spencer was one of the first physicians to learn how to insert the Norplant device.
NEWS
July 18, 2014
The photos of the immigrants pouring across the border certainly tug at our heartstrings. We've heard stories of the desire of these immigrants to escape threatening conditions, obtain desperately needed medical attention and seek a better life. The exhausted look of the women and frightened faces of the children speak volumes. Also filling the news lately have been stories about the government's unfairness to women in allowing employers to exempt themselves from paying for certain contraceptives if this runs against their religious beliefs.
NEWS
By Susan Reimer | May 30, 1999
WHEN WAL-MART announced earlier this month that it would not carry a new pregnancy prevention pill, it unwittingly did women a great service.The retailing giant spotlighted one of the best-kept secrets in reproductive health.For more than a generation, doctors knew what most women did not -- that two birth control pills, taken within three days of sex and then again 12 hours later, could prevent pregnancy.Not terminate pregnancy. Prevent it.Doctors would tell women patients who called in a panic, but they did not often volunteer it as part of routine contraceptive advice.
NEWS
By CYNTHIA TUCKER | January 23, 2006
ATLANTA -- If President Bush gets his way, the Supreme Court will vacate Roe v. Wade even before Mr. Bush vacates the White House. With the expected confirmation of Judge Samuel A. Alito Jr. - and depending on the vote of the moderately conservative Justice Anthony M. Kennedy - the right to a legal abortion could be struck down, leaving states to decide whether to keep abortion legal. Two years ago, the Center for Reproductive Rights estimated that 30 states would declare abortions illegal within a year of a high court decision overturning Roe. That makes it all the more important that progressives unite in a campaign to persuade sexually active Americans to use contraceptives.
NEWS
By New York Times | November 29, 1991
Nearly a year after the Food and Drug Administration approved Norplant, the contraceptive that works for as long as five years after it is implanted in a woman's upper arm, public health officials and family-planning clinics say the device works well and is on its way to wide usage.State public health officials say the demand for Norplant at subsidized family-planning clinics is so large that it is impossible to keep up with."We've done 1,200 insertions, and we have waiting lists all over for the next 800 we ordered," said Carla Schmidt of the Florida Family Health Service.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Staff Writer | October 30, 1992
The Food and Drug Administration swept away decades of controversy yesterday by approving the drug Depo Provera for use as an injectable contraceptive that gives three months of birth control with each shot.Immediately, family planning doctors hailed the action, predicting that it will be embraced by hundreds of thousands of U.S. women eager for a long-term contraceptive that requires no maintenance except a new injection every 90 days."I think it's a tremendous step forward," said Dr. Edward Wallach, chairman of obstetrics and gynecology at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine.
NEWS
By Sue Miller and Sue Miller,Evening Sun Staff | March 14, 1991
Maryland is one of the first states in the country that will use Medicaid funds to pick up the tab for poor women who choose to use Norplant -- the new reversible, five-year contraceptive expected to be available here early next month."
NEWS
By Marlene Cimons and Marlene Cimons,Los Angeles Times | June 20, 1992
WASHINGTON -- A federal advisory panel recommended yesterday that the government approve Depo-Provera, a highly effective but controversial contraceptive that provides three months of protection with a single injection.The drug, manufactured by the Upjohn Co. of Kalamazoo, Mich., is already marketed in more than 90 countries -- including the Britain, Germany, France, New Zealand, and Sweden -- and has been used by an estimated 30 million women worldwide.But it has repeatedly failed to win approval in the United States for the past 25 years because of concerns, raised in animal studies, that the drug increased the risk of cancers of the cervix, liver and breast.
NEWS
By Michelle Jefferson | July 10, 2014
I came of age in 1980, just as the women's movement hit its full stride, and those were the days. At my first real job I had sign that read: "Women have to do twice as much to be thought of half as good as men; luckily, this is not difficult. " Unlike our mothers and grandmothers, we faced an open world of opportunity, possibilities, goals and achievable dreams. No more would we be limited to being receptionists, nurses and teachers - you know, the girls-only jobs. In fact, I and most of my girlfriends were in the science/math curriculum in school and attended some form of college.
NEWS
July 3, 2014
Will somebody please tell Sandra Fluke to shut up? Her fifteen minutes of fame are over and every time she opens her mouth she simply shows off how stupid she is ( "Musings on intolerant lefties and wars on women," May 18). There is no constitutional right to free contraceptives and the Hobby Lobby decision neither denies her access to contraceptives nor puts her employer in the position of making - and lets be honest about this - sexual relationship decisions for her. In fact, it empowers her to make her own sexual relationship decisions by spending her own money - which, by the way, is how it should be. There is no constitutional right to Viagra or any other erectile dysfunction medication either.
NEWS
Erin Cox and The Baltimore Sun | June 30, 2014
Gov. Martin O'Malley sharply criticized Monday's U.S. Supreme Court ruling that certain corporations can cite religious grounds in refusing to pay for employee's contraception coverage.  The ruling, spurred by a lawsuit from Hobby Lobby, picks at one of the mandates of the Affordable Care Act. "No woman should have her health care decisions made by her boss. Period. This decision is wrong and a setback for women's health," the governor said in a tweet from his official account.
HEALTH
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | June 30, 2014
The U.S. Supreme Court delivered a setback to the Obama administration Monday by ruling that the owners of private companies may refuse on religious grounds to offer employees insurance coverage for birth control. In a 5-4 ruling, the court's conservatives found that the requirement for contraceptive coverage tied to Obama's signature health care law ran afoul of a 1993 law expanding religious freedom. The decision, written by Justice Samuel A. Alito Jr., could have implications not only for secular companies but also religious organizations that are seeking a more complete exemption from the same requirement, including the Little Sisters of the Poor, a Catonsville-based Catholic charity.
NEWS
June 30, 2014
In recognizing that for-profit corporations like Hobby Lobby can hold religious beliefs that trump secular laws like the Affordable Care Act's requirement that women have access to contraceptives without out-of-pocket costs, the Supreme Court has moved the nation in an unwelcome direction. Differentiating between religious organizations and private companies used to be a straightforward matter (and a practice dating back to English common law), but now that distinction is no longer so clear.
NEWS
June 27, 2014
Though I was elated to see our wonderful Archbishop William Lori's photo in The Sun recently, I read with quite a laugh the commentary by Jon O'Brien that accompanied it ( "Whose freedom are the bishops protecting?" June 19). Catholics for Choice? All practicing Catholics should follow every aspect of our faith, including the prohibition against contraception. We will pray that Carla Hale and the woman identified only as "Sandra" revert back to their true Catholic baptism and willingly adhere to the teachings and doctrines of our glorious Church and its leaders.
NEWS
By New York Times | November 29, 1991
Nearly a year after the Food and Drug Administration approved Norplant, the contraceptive that works for as long as five years after it is implanted in a woman's upper arm, public health officials and family-planning clinics say the device works well and is on its way to wide usage.State public health officials say the demand for Norplant at subsidized family-planning clinics is so large that it is impossible to keep up with."We've done 1,200 insertions, and we have waiting lists all over for the next 800 we ordered," said Carla Schmidt of the Florida Family Health Service.
NEWS
By Megan Kennedy and Megan Kennedy,contributing writer | February 21, 1999
After giving birth, a 19-year-old Baltimore resident headed to Planned Parenthood and got her first injection of the contraceptive Depo-Provera. One year later, she "likes Depo because I don't have time to remember to take the pill."This young mother is one of the many teens who are finding Depo-Provera a more convenient, more reliable method of birth control. In fact, family planning counselors say the reason teen pregnancy rates have dropped in both Baltimore and the nation is due, in part, to Depo-Provera.
NEWS
April 1, 2014
What supreme irony that a spokesperson for a group called Women Speak for Themselves has written a letter to the editor supporting a position that allows women's employers to speak for them instead ("Women oppose contraception mandate," March 31). This is just one more example of absurd religious thinking. Kenneth Hoffman, Annapolis - To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com . Please include your name and contact information.
NEWS
March 31, 2014
Since the inception of the contraception mandate, the federal government has struggled to paint its position as the only legitimate pro-woman stance and to paint religious Americans as irrational and anti-women ( "Don't open Pandora's box," March 24). The 41,000 strong grass roots network of women, Women Speak for Themselves, has continually demonstrated that the government is wrong on both counts by working in local communities and states to educate politicians, the media and the public about women's support for religious freedom and their opposition to the mandate.
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