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BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | August 20, 1999
Ten inmates were placed in segregation yesterday at the Carroll County Detention Center after officials found contraband, including a homemade pipe used to smoke marijuana, a dozen unidentified pills, about 60 cigarettes, and cash, authorities said.Nine of the inmates were trusties -- those with privileges to perform housekeeping and other chores -- and are housed in the same area of the crowded jail as inmates on work-release, said Warden George Hardinger.The inmates are to be given administrative hearings today and disciplined, if necessary, Hardinger said.
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NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | October 29, 2013
A Baltimore jail corrections officer who had a sexual relationship with two incarcerated gang members pleaded guilty Tuesday to her role in a major smuggling network at the facility. Kimberly Dennis, 26, is the seventh officer to plead guilty in the case, in which federal authorities alleged that the Black Guerrilla Family gang ran a sophisticated operation smuggling drugs, tobacco and cell phones in the Baltimore City Detention Center. Dennis had sexual relationships with alleged gang member Derius Duncan and another inmate who has not been charged in the case.
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NEWS
By Greg Garland and Greg Garland,SUN STAFF | July 6, 2005
A black market bazaar of heroin, marijuana, pornographic videos, tobacco, cell phones and top-shelf liquor is routinely being smuggled past security checkpoints and into Maryland's troubled prisons, an investigation by The Sun has found. Periodic cell searches and prison sweeps have turned up such a trove of contraband over the past year that the Division of Correction is launching new attempts to stem the flow, including more thorough searches of staff, visitors and volunteers. "I have a group right now working on front gate entrance procedures," said Correction Commissioner Frank.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | September 25, 2013
A woman who supplied Black Guerrilla Family gang members with drugs to sell at the Baltimore jail pleaded guilty Wednesday to a conspiracy charge in federal court. Tyesha Mayo, 30, obtained marijuana and prescription pills and handed them off to corrupt corrections officers, who smuggled them past the walls of the Baltimore City Detention Center and into the hands of gang leader Tavon White, according to facts supporting her plea presented in court. In return, White paid Mayo using electronic transfers and cash, according to the statement.
NEWS
December 20, 1998
WESTMINSTER -- A woman serving a six-month sentence for theft at the Carroll County Detention Center was treated at a hospital last week after she swallowed what was suspected to be cocaine during a routine strip search, authorities said.The inmate, Jean E. Ingrassia, 47, had been granted work release Tuesday, jail officials said.Upon returning from work Thursday evening, Ingrassia was searched for contraband. Deputies reported finding 38 cigarettes wrapped in plastic and hidden in a body cavity.
NEWS
January 13, 2000
ADVOCATES turning Elian Gonzalez into a political cause rather than condemn him to life in Communist Cuba presumably do not extend the same logic to hundreds of Chinese enduring unspeakable privation to reach these shores from Communist China. Immigration agents discovered 87 stowaways aboard six ships in West Coast ports from Jan. 2 to Jan. 10. Three immigrants died in one 8-foot by 40-foot container, with 15 survivors living beside the bodies. The endurance and sacrifice of the illegal immigrants surviving these horrendous voyages, as with the Cubans, inspire admiration.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,tricia.bishop@baltsun.com | September 4, 2009
A few years ago, two prisoners used contraband cell phones to orchestrate their escape from the Evansville Correctional Institution in South Carolina. They called relatives, told them where to put wire cutters and when to meet. The calls continued until the inmates were sprung, said Maj. Robert Murray of the South Carolina Department of Corrections, and it still sticks in his craw. Murray was among dozens of officials from across the country who came to the closed Maryland House of Corrections in Jessup Thursday for a daylong fact- finding mission on how to clamp down on rampant use of mobile phones by inmates.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | October 29, 2013
A Baltimore jail corrections officer who had a sexual relationship with two incarcerated gang members pleaded guilty Tuesday to her role in a major smuggling network at the facility. Kimberly Dennis, 26, is the seventh officer to plead guilty in the case, in which federal authorities alleged that the Black Guerrilla Family gang ran a sophisticated operation smuggling drugs, tobacco and cell phones in the Baltimore City Detention Center. Dennis had sexual relationships with alleged gang member Derius Duncan and another inmate who has not been charged in the case.
NEWS
By GREG GARLAND and GREG GARLAND,SUN REPORTER | November 6, 2005
State prison officials say they have filed criminal charges against several correctional officers and visitors who they say were caught trying to smuggle drugs and other contraband into Maryland prisons in recent weeks. "Officers and visitors bringing contraband into our facilities will not be tolerated because their actions create an atmosphere that leads to violence and compromises the safety of the staff, inmates and the public," Division of Correction Commissioner Frank C. Sizer Jr. said.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson and Jessica Anderson,SUN REPORTER | July 10, 2008
Dogs have long been used to find drugs in prisons, but the Maryland Department of Public Safety and Correctional Services has found a new use for them: sniffing out cell phones. Three canines were specially trained by Division of Correction K-9 Unit officers to detect cell phones as part of stepped-up efforts to stop contraband from getting into state prisons. In the past few years, Maryland inmates have increasingly been caught with cell phones, which in some cases have been used to arrange drug deals or even killings from behind bars.
NEWS
July 18, 2013
Investigators looking into alleged corruption at the Baltimore City Detention Center appear to have made a major breakthrough this week when Black Guerrilla Family prison gang leader Tavon White, the inmate accused of masterminding a drug- and contraband-smuggling ring inside the jail, agreed to name additional staffers who participated in the scheme beyond the 13 female guards already charged. Now that Mr. White is talking to prosecutors, we can hope that more indictments will follow and give a much more complete picture of the wrongdoing at the facility.
NEWS
By Ken North | May 23, 2013
In less than a generation, mobile communications have evolved from a luxury item to an essential element of everyday life. With nearly 7 billion devices in use, mobile communications are nearly ubiquitous, impacting the way we work and live throughout the world every day. As the use of mobile cellular communications continues to expand rapidly, the federal government and Maryland must continue to keep pace with emerging technologies and enact policies...
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | May 19, 2013
Maryland corrections officials are taking advantage of new technology designed to block the use of contraband cellphones by inmates - a problem at the heart of recent indictments at the Baltimore City Detention Center. In a program being used at another prison facility in Baltimore, phones smuggled inside have been severed from the network and rendered inoperable, officials said. The new system, which the Department of Public Safety and Correctional Services hopes to expand, could supplement efforts to find the phones using metal detectors or trained dogs to sniff them out. The department says it is catching more illicit phones than ever - more than 1,300 were found in the last fiscal year - but the federal indictments show the limits of those efforts.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | April 30, 2013
The inmates' requests often start small, former corrections officers say: a ballpoint pen, for example, or a sandwich from beyond the prison walls. "You may think it's insignificant," said former Cpl. Sheila Hill, who retired last year from the Patuxent Institution in Jessup. "But it's not. " Even small gifts cross the clear line that should be drawn between inmates and officers, Hill and others said Tuesday. It's a line that federal officials say was flagrantly broken at the Baltimore City Detention Center.
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | August 11, 2011
When RCA introduced its first television, the set was encased in clear Lucite, so visitors to the 1939 World's Fair in New York could see the electronic innards and walk away confident that the sound and video were not a mere trick. Decades later, the venerable electronics company resurrected clear-case televisions for a different purpose: to ensure prisoners could not hide contraband in their cells. And though RCA has dropped out of the market, prison cells in Maryland and other states still are filled with the unusual TVs made by other companies.
NEWS
By Jill Rosen, The Baltimore Sun | October 20, 2010
Underneath the mattress isn't going to cut it. Neither will tucking it behind the stack of "Twilight" books. Not even pushing it deep into the toe of a smelly gym shoe. The dog will find it. And he'll know it's not oregano. A new service in Maryland is promising parents peace of mind by allowing them to essentially rent a drug-sniffing dog, a highly trained canine that will come to their house and within seconds, detect even the tiniest whiff of narcotics. The program allows ordinary moms and dads access to a search tool typically reserved for law enforcement — and typically aimed at suspected criminals.
NEWS
July 18, 2013
Investigators looking into alleged corruption at the Baltimore City Detention Center appear to have made a major breakthrough this week when Black Guerrilla Family prison gang leader Tavon White, the inmate accused of masterminding a drug- and contraband-smuggling ring inside the jail, agreed to name additional staffers who participated in the scheme beyond the 13 female guards already charged. Now that Mr. White is talking to prosecutors, we can hope that more indictments will follow and give a much more complete picture of the wrongdoing at the facility.
NEWS
By Thom Loverro and Thom Loverro,Western Maryland Bureau of The Sun | November 1, 1990
CUMBERLAND -- An Allegany County District Court judge set bond at $500,000 each yesterday for Sandra Kay Beeman, the former Allegany County Jail guard charged with helping two inmates escape, and Edgar Eugene Kerns, one of the escapers.Mrs. Beeman, 46, appeared in shackles before Judge Paul J. Stakem for her bond hearing. Deputy State's Attorney Barry Levine asked that no bond be set but that if the judge did set one, "that it be a substantial amount."In setting Mrs. Beeman's bond, Judge Stakem said that although she has no criminal record, "the most important factor is the nature of the offense."
NEWS
By Jon Ozmint | May 27, 2010
In 2007, a federal witness in Baltimore, Carl Lackl of Rosedale, was murdered after a Maryland inmate put out a "hit" on him using a cell phone. Largely because of that tragedy, in October 2009 the U.S. Senate finally passed the Safe Prisons Communications Act. The purpose of the act is to allow "surgical" jamming of cell phones inside of prisons. Seemingly every week, published reports depict new crimes committed by inmates with cell phones. Just last month, authorities in Indiana announced arrests in a methamphetamine ring that was operated by an inmate using cell phones.
NEWS
February 18, 2010
T here's a growing sense among the nation's correctional institutions that the most dangerous contraband being smuggled into prisons isn't drugs, and it's not weapons. It's cell phones. They're turning up by the thousands in prison cells in Maryland and across the nation, and they're being used to coordinate criminal activity behind bars and on the outside. One of the most famous cases was the 2007 murder of Rosedale man Carl Lackl, who was a witness to another killing. A week before Mr. Lackl was to testify, the defendant in that case, Steven Byers, arranged his murder from behind bars, using a contraband cell phone.
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