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NEWS
August 22, 2002
OH WHERE, oh where has the Contour gone, oh where, oh where has it gone? On its way to a date with a comet, NASA's one-ton spacecraft failed to check in. Not a radio signal. Not a peep, and this after six weeks of ably performing a series of maneuvers -- 23 in all -- in preparation for its big boost from the Earth's orbit to dally with two comets. It's not like spacecraft don't show up missing now and then, or give their handlers the silent treatment or, sadly, explode. But the scientists and staff at the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory have built 60 spacecraft and not one has disappeared in 30 years.
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NEWS
April 26, 2008
1 killed, 5 hurt in 3-car collision in Glen Burnie One person died and five people were sent to hospitals after a fiery three-car collision yesterday in Anne Arundel County, according to state police. The accident occurred shortly before noon, when the driver of a 1996 Ford Contour was traveling south on Route 10 in the center lane, near the intersection with Route 648 in Glen Burnie, near Marley Creek. The Contour stopped suddenly, police said, and a Cadillac Escalade, which was behind the Contour, struck the rear of the car. A Ford truck, which was behind the Escalade, struck the SUV, rupturing the fuel tank, which caused a fire.
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NEWS
By New York Times News Service | October 18, 1994
DETROIT -- For the second time in two months, Ford Motor Co. is recalling its new Contour and Mystique compact sedans because of a defect in the fuel systems that could cause fires.Because it cannot make corrected tanks fast enough, Ford said that it has halted production of the cars for a week, which will exacerbate dealer shortages of the cars just as Ford is promoting them with a major introductory advertising campaign.A total of 28,500 cars have the defect, including almost 8,000 Ford Contours and Mercury Mystiques that are already in customers' hands in the United States and Canada.
NEWS
By Tanika White and Tanika White,Sun Staff | February 13, 2005
A better brush Clinique's new makeup brushes are sleek and professional looking. They also feature a patent-pending anti-microbial technology that's intended to protect the brushes from mold, fungus and bacteria. The brushes include three for eye makeup -- shader, shadow and contour -- and one each for powder, blush and concealer. They sell for $16.50 to $30 each and will be available next month at Clinique counters nationwide and at www.clinique.com. Hand-sewn handbags earn a big hand Some years back, when Deborah Foland would get dressed to go out with her husband, she often discovered that the perfect handbag she needed to go along with her outfit just didn't exist.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,Sun Staff Writer | September 29, 1994
Ford Motor Co.'s $6 billion gamble to lure the American baby boomer behind the wheel of a small domestic car begins today with the formal introduction of the Ford Contour and its sister car, the Mercury Mystique.While the jury is still out on Ford's latest offering, there are some early indications that it will be Japanese carmakers, not Ford executives, who will be losing sleep in the days ahead.The editors of Motor Trend magazine predict that the Contour and Mystique will deal the imports a heavy blow, especially as the rising value of the yen makes Japanese cars more expensive in the United States.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | August 24, 2002
The director of NASA's $159 million Contour mission says there is no more than a "one in 10,000" chance that his team will recover the spacecraft, which went silent Aug. 15, six weeks into a four-year journey to study comets. Controllers at the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory near Laurel lost contact with the spacecraft soon after it fired its solid-fuel motor last week to rocket out of Earth orbit toward an encounter with Comet Encke planned for next year. Misson Director Robert W. Farquhar said the spacecraft's motor apparently worked perfectly for 48 seconds of the planned 50-second burn.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | February 13, 2003
The chief of the NASA team investigating the loss of the $159 million Contour comet rendezvous mission last summer said yesterday that faulty design was the most likely reason the Maryland-built spacecraft broke apart during a critical rocket firing. Contour's solid-fuel rocket motor was placed too far inside its body, the NASA panel reportedly found, and hot gases probably caused the probe to break apart two seconds before the end of a planned 50-second engine burn. "That will be the leading cause in our report," lead investigator Theron Bradley Jr., told the Associated Press yesterday.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | July 4, 2002
LAUREL - NASA's four-year mission to study comets and their links to the emergence of life on Earth was off to a good start yesterday, with the spacecraft in the right orbit and functioning normally. The $159 million Contour (for Comet Nucleus Tour) mission lifted off from the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station atop a Delta 2 rocket at 2:47 a.m., just minutes after the last rain clouds cleared away. Televised views of the fiery ascent drew whoops and applause at the Johns Hopkins University's Applied Physics Laboratory in Laurel, where the spacecraft was designed and built.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | August 16, 2002
NASA's Contour spacecraft has gone missing only six weeks into a planned four-year, $159 million mission to fly past two comets. Controllers at the Johns Hopkins University's Applied Physics Laboratory near Laurel said yesterday that they lost contact with the one-ton spacecraft early yesterday, shortly after it was scheduled to fire its solid rocket engine and zip away from Earth toward its first rendezvous with a comet in 2003. They immediately issued an all-points bulletin, asking the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's powerful Deep Space Network antennas to begin searching the skies and listening for Contour's radio signals.
NEWS
April 10, 2000
Fires Mount airy: Firefighters responded at 4: 49 p.m. Thursday to a woods fire in the 200 block of Contour Road. Mount Airy: Firefighters responded at 2: 41 p.m. Thursday to a field fire in the 7400 block of Watersville Road. Units were out 32 minutes.
NEWS
February 24, 2003
Investigation of comet probe isn't complete The Sun's article "Design flaw blamed in Contour breakup" (Feb. 13) was based on an Associated Press report that incorrectly identified Comet Nucleus Tour (Contour) spacecraft design as the leading cause for the spacecraft's failure on Aug. 15. The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory - which designed and built the Contour and managed the comet-study mission for NASA - has worked very closely with the NASA Mishap Investigation Board over the past six months.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | February 13, 2003
The chief of the NASA team investigating the loss of the $159 million Contour comet rendezvous mission last summer said yesterday that faulty design was the most likely reason the Maryland-built spacecraft broke apart during a critical rocket firing. Contour's solid-fuel rocket motor was placed too far inside its body, the NASA panel reportedly found, and hot gases probably caused the probe to break apart two seconds before the end of a planned 50-second engine burn. "That will be the leading cause in our report," lead investigator Theron Bradley Jr., told the Associated Press yesterday.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | August 27, 2002
Just 11 days after losing contact with NASA's Maryland-built Contour spacecraft, mission scientists said yesterday that they are drafting plans for a nearly identical, cut-rate effort to buzz the same two comets the first mission targeted. "Should we not be able to recover Contour, we will proceed aggressively with Contour 2," said Cornell University's Joseph Veverka, the principal investigator on the $159 million mission. "We're planning to have another go at it." Until a formal proposal is developed and submitted to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, he said, it is pointless to speculate about how it might be received.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | August 24, 2002
The director of NASA's $159 million Contour mission says there is no more than a "one in 10,000" chance that his team will recover the spacecraft, which went silent Aug. 15, six weeks into a four-year journey to study comets. Controllers at the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory near Laurel lost contact with the spacecraft soon after it fired its solid-fuel motor last week to rocket out of Earth orbit toward an encounter with Comet Encke planned for next year. Misson Director Robert W. Farquhar said the spacecraft's motor apparently worked perfectly for 48 seconds of the planned 50-second burn.
NEWS
August 22, 2002
OH WHERE, oh where has the Contour gone, oh where, oh where has it gone? On its way to a date with a comet, NASA's one-ton spacecraft failed to check in. Not a radio signal. Not a peep, and this after six weeks of ably performing a series of maneuvers -- 23 in all -- in preparation for its big boost from the Earth's orbit to dally with two comets. It's not like spacecraft don't show up missing now and then, or give their handlers the silent treatment or, sadly, explode. But the scientists and staff at the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory have built 60 spacecraft and not one has disappeared in 30 years.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | August 16, 2002
NASA's Contour spacecraft has gone missing only six weeks into a planned four-year, $159 million mission to fly past two comets. Controllers at the Johns Hopkins University's Applied Physics Laboratory near Laurel said yesterday that they lost contact with the one-ton spacecraft early yesterday, shortly after it was scheduled to fire its solid rocket engine and zip away from Earth toward its first rendezvous with a comet in 2003. They immediately issued an all-points bulletin, asking the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's powerful Deep Space Network antennas to begin searching the skies and listening for Contour's radio signals.
NEWS
April 26, 2008
1 killed, 5 hurt in 3-car collision in Glen Burnie One person died and five people were sent to hospitals after a fiery three-car collision yesterday in Anne Arundel County, according to state police. The accident occurred shortly before noon, when the driver of a 1996 Ford Contour was traveling south on Route 10 in the center lane, near the intersection with Route 648 in Glen Burnie, near Marley Creek. The Contour stopped suddenly, police said, and a Cadillac Escalade, which was behind the Contour, struck the rear of the car. A Ford truck, which was behind the Escalade, struck the SUV, rupturing the fuel tank, which caused a fire.
BUSINESS
By Christian Science Monitor | August 1, 1994
KANSAS CITY, Mo. -- The Ford Motor Co. has a lot riding on its new Contour sedan.With Ford President Ed Hagenlocker behind the wheel, the first Contour rolled off the assembly line this month. It marked the culmination of a $6 billion project aimed at developing Ford's first "world car," a vehicle the American automaker can sell around the world with only minor changes to cater to local tastes and needs.The project, known internally by the corporate code name CDW27, serves as a role model for Ford's recently announced global reorganization.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | July 4, 2002
LAUREL - NASA's four-year mission to study comets and their links to the emergence of life on Earth was off to a good start yesterday, with the spacecraft in the right orbit and functioning normally. The $159 million Contour (for Comet Nucleus Tour) mission lifted off from the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station atop a Delta 2 rocket at 2:47 a.m., just minutes after the last rain clouds cleared away. Televised views of the fiery ascent drew whoops and applause at the Johns Hopkins University's Applied Physics Laboratory in Laurel, where the spacecraft was designed and built.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | June 13, 2002
WASHINGTON - Scientists are preparing for the launch July 1 of a new spacecraft designed to fly as close as 60 miles to the icy cores of two approaching comets - and perhaps provide clues to the origins of life on Earth. If it works, the $159 million Contour mission would provide scientists with their closest look at two very different types of comets. The first encounter is set for late next year. Contour (for Comet Nucleus Tour) was built at the Johns Hopkins University's Applied Physics Lab, and the mission will be run from the APL's Laurel campus.
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