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By New York Times News Service | May 7, 2000
In waters off Virginia and North Carolina, scientists have found cracks in the seabed that might set off a tsunami, they say, sending waves as high as 20 feet speeding toward the mid-Atlantic states. Neal W. Driscoll of the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute, Jeffrey K. Weissel of Columbia University and John A. Goff of the University of Texas said in an article in a recent issue of the journal Geology that the recently discovered cracks could mean the continental shelf is unstable and could slide down like an avalanche, inducing the giant waves.
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By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | August 11, 2014
Seventy miles off Ocean City , scientists aboard the federal research vessel Henry B. Bigelow are exploring a lush underwater landscape that until recently few would have imagined - colorful corals clinging to the rocky slopes of deep-sea canyons. On this and other research cruises, remotely guided submersible cameras have captured scenes of bubblegum corals, sea whips and more growing in the dark, hundreds to thousands of feet below the Atlantic Ocean's surface. Other smaller patches dot the ocean floor in shallower waters closer to shore.
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NEWS
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,SUN STAFF | August 6, 2003
CHINCOTEAGUE, Va. - Rusty and cluttered with gear, the fishing boat Toots may not be the prettiest vessel ever to ply the deep-blue waters off the coast of Maryland and Virginia, but the beauty of its catch more than makes up for it. With the trawler safely docked, Joe Kelly and his two-man crew haul up the heavy ice chests, one by one, from below deck. They pop the lids and survey the glorious bounty, brownish-black with a greenish tinge, multi-legged jewels nestled in layers of crushed ice. Homarus americanus.
NEWS
By Bonner Cohen | July 6, 2009
President Barack Obama is playing Russian roulette with America's quest for energy independence by rushing to replace fossil fuels with unreliable and expensive renewable energy. The global balance of power is already shifting away from the United States toward China and Russia in the critical area of strategic natural resources. Earlier this year, the cash-rich Chinese embarked on a veritable shopping spree, snatching up energy and mineral resources around the world at bargain-basement prices.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | June 2, 2000
Did we say tidal waves? Sorry, it's giant gas bubbles from the deep that should be troubling your dreams. It turns out those "cracks" in the sea floor off the Virginia coast - the ones that geologists said last month could trigger an undersea landslide and send 20-foot tidal waves crashing ashore - aren't really cracks after all. The same scientists now say the "cracks" are actually huge, elongated craters formed by natural gas "blowouts" - giant, flammable...
NEWS
By Robert Hanley and Robert Hanley,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 10, 2003
FORT HANCOCK, N.J. - For most underwater archaeologists, the big dream these days is finding a shipwreck full of gold and antique treasures. But for Daria E. Merwin, the goal has a bit less glitter: discovering a 10,000-year-old heap of shells and some ancient arrowheads, spear points and cutting tools in the waters off New Jersey. Merwin, a 33-year-old doctoral student in anthropology, says such artifacts would help prove her thesis that prehistoric Indians lived 6,000 to 10,000 years ago on the exposed continental shelf before it was inundated by water from melting glaciers.
NEWS
By Bonner Cohen | July 6, 2009
President Barack Obama is playing Russian roulette with America's quest for energy independence by rushing to replace fossil fuels with unreliable and expensive renewable energy. The global balance of power is already shifting away from the United States toward China and Russia in the critical area of strategic natural resources. Earlier this year, the cash-rich Chinese embarked on a veritable shopping spree, snatching up energy and mineral resources around the world at bargain-basement prices.
NEWS
By David Holley and David Holley,Los Angeles Times | August 3, 2007
MOSCOW -- Two Russian mini-submarines returned to the surface at the North Pole yesterday after diving to the sea bottom to plant a flag and collect geological samples. "It was so lovely down there," Artur Chilingarov, a prominent polar explorer who descended in the first mini-sub, told Russian news media after the dive. "If a hundred or a thousand years from now, someone goes down to where we were, they will see the Russian flag," he said, according to the Russian news agency Itar-Tass.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 9, 2006
WASHINGTON -- A Bush administration proposal to open an energy-rich tract of the Gulf of Mexico to oil and gas drilling has touched off a tough fight in Congress, the latest demonstration of the political barriers to providing new energy supplies even at a time of high demand and record prices. The 2 million-acre area, in deep waters 100 miles south of Pensacola, Fla., is estimated to contain nearly half a billion barrels of oil and 3 trillion cubic feet of natural gas, enough to run roughly a million vehicles and heat more than half a million homes for about 15 years.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | February 17, 1991
The United States and the Soviet Union have agreed to establish a research station on the drifting ice of the Weddell Sea in their first joint scientific effort in Antarctica.Researchers hope the station's 31 workers will obtain new data about the ice-covered sea and the floor beneath it, probably the least-known oceanic region on Earth.The plan is for the Soviet ice-breaking research ship, Akademik Federov, to set up the station in January and February 1992 on a large ice floe in the southwest part of the Weddell Sea.The station is expected to drift north, parallel to the Antarctic Peninsula, along the edge of the submerged continental shelf.
NEWS
By David Holley and David Holley,Los Angeles Times | August 3, 2007
MOSCOW -- Two Russian mini-submarines returned to the surface at the North Pole yesterday after diving to the sea bottom to plant a flag and collect geological samples. "It was so lovely down there," Artur Chilingarov, a prominent polar explorer who descended in the first mini-sub, told Russian news media after the dive. "If a hundred or a thousand years from now, someone goes down to where we were, they will see the Russian flag," he said, according to the Russian news agency Itar-Tass.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 9, 2006
WASHINGTON -- A Bush administration proposal to open an energy-rich tract of the Gulf of Mexico to oil and gas drilling has touched off a tough fight in Congress, the latest demonstration of the political barriers to providing new energy supplies even at a time of high demand and record prices. The 2 million-acre area, in deep waters 100 miles south of Pensacola, Fla., is estimated to contain nearly half a billion barrels of oil and 3 trillion cubic feet of natural gas, enough to run roughly a million vehicles and heat more than half a million homes for about 15 years.
NEWS
By Robert Hanley and Robert Hanley,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 10, 2003
FORT HANCOCK, N.J. - For most underwater archaeologists, the big dream these days is finding a shipwreck full of gold and antique treasures. But for Daria E. Merwin, the goal has a bit less glitter: discovering a 10,000-year-old heap of shells and some ancient arrowheads, spear points and cutting tools in the waters off New Jersey. Merwin, a 33-year-old doctoral student in anthropology, says such artifacts would help prove her thesis that prehistoric Indians lived 6,000 to 10,000 years ago on the exposed continental shelf before it was inundated by water from melting glaciers.
NEWS
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,SUN STAFF | August 6, 2003
CHINCOTEAGUE, Va. - Rusty and cluttered with gear, the fishing boat Toots may not be the prettiest vessel ever to ply the deep-blue waters off the coast of Maryland and Virginia, but the beauty of its catch more than makes up for it. With the trawler safely docked, Joe Kelly and his two-man crew haul up the heavy ice chests, one by one, from below deck. They pop the lids and survey the glorious bounty, brownish-black with a greenish tinge, multi-legged jewels nestled in layers of crushed ice. Homarus americanus.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | June 2, 2000
Did we say tidal waves? Sorry, it's giant gas bubbles from the deep that should be troubling your dreams. It turns out those "cracks" in the sea floor off the Virginia coast - the ones that geologists said last month could trigger an undersea landslide and send 20-foot tidal waves crashing ashore - aren't really cracks after all. The same scientists now say the "cracks" are actually huge, elongated craters formed by natural gas "blowouts" - giant, flammable...
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | May 7, 2000
In waters off Virginia and North Carolina, scientists have found cracks in the seabed that might set off a tsunami, they say, sending waves as high as 20 feet speeding toward the mid-Atlantic states. Neal W. Driscoll of the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute, Jeffrey K. Weissel of Columbia University and John A. Goff of the University of Texas said in an article in a recent issue of the journal Geology that the recently discovered cracks could mean the continental shelf is unstable and could slide down like an avalanche, inducing the giant waves.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | August 11, 2014
Seventy miles off Ocean City , scientists aboard the federal research vessel Henry B. Bigelow are exploring a lush underwater landscape that until recently few would have imagined - colorful corals clinging to the rocky slopes of deep-sea canyons. On this and other research cruises, remotely guided submersible cameras have captured scenes of bubblegum corals, sea whips and more growing in the dark, hundreds to thousands of feet below the Atlantic Ocean's surface. Other smaller patches dot the ocean floor in shallower waters closer to shore.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 13, 1998
MONTEREY, Calif. -- President Clinton, navigating a middle course between environmentalists and oil companies, announced yesterday a 10-year extension of the current moratorium on oil drilling off virtually all American ocean coastlines.Clinton also placed several existing marine sanctuaries permanently off-limits to oil exploration. The areas include the Channel Islands and Monterey Bay sanctuaries in California, the Florida Keys, Gray's Reef in Georgia and the Olympic Coast sanctuary off Washington state.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | February 17, 1991
The United States and the Soviet Union have agreed to establish a research station on the drifting ice of the Weddell Sea in their first joint scientific effort in Antarctica.Researchers hope the station's 31 workers will obtain new data about the ice-covered sea and the floor beneath it, probably the least-known oceanic region on Earth.The plan is for the Soviet ice-breaking research ship, Akademik Federov, to set up the station in January and February 1992 on a large ice floe in the southwest part of the Weddell Sea.The station is expected to drift north, parallel to the Antarctic Peninsula, along the edge of the submerged continental shelf.
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