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Continental Divide

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NEWS
By Thom Loverro and Thom Loverro,Western Maryland Bureau of The Sun | December 2, 1990
If you happen to be heading through Garrett County on U.S. 48 and toss some cold coffee out of the car window near Green Lantern Road, it could wind up either in the Chesapeake Bay or the Mississippi River.It all depends on which side of the Eastern Continental Divide you chose for your toss.Unlike its better-known cousin west in the Rocky Mountains, the Eastern Continental Divide is the subject of little interest or discussion.But for county residents and others interested in this geographical landmark, it is a unique characteristic that only Garrett County can lay claim to in the state.
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NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | August 7, 2010
In Dundalk and Essex they're getting to know Baltimore County Councilman Kevin Kamenetz, who is from way over on the west side; in Pikesville and along Liberty Road they're taking a closer look at his fellow council member, Joseph Bartenfelder, from way over on the east side. In this sprawling county where folks identify closely with their neighborhoods, the two best-known candidates for the Democratic nomination for county executive are seeking inroads in each other's home turf, fighting cultural barriers and political tradition.
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TRAVEL
By Mike Morris and Mike Morris,Sun Staff | November 3, 2002
Years ago, travel writer Cindy Ross would bring Appalachian Trail hikers to her rustic home in central Pennsylvania near the trail and cook them a warm dinner. In 1980, she brought back her future husband, a shy 19-year-old hiker, and fed him venison from a deer she had shot earlier that week. The two got together a few years later to hike the Pacific Crest Trail, and they married in 1983. By the early 1990s, the outdoor enthusiasts were raising two children, Bryce and Sierra (both named after national parks)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sarah Schaffer and Sarah Schaffer,SUN STAFF | July 15, 2004
This stuff came out of the can spoiled. The schtick's ... been ruined since I came up with it," reported mopy comic Neil Hamburger, as he called from Los Angeles to talk about his act. Currently playing the nation's rock clubs and, he says, the occasional casino or "second-tier" pizza parlor, Hamburger indeed covers bizarre and boring topics - from candy fillings to kangaroos - delivering each sorry punchline with a heavy dose of pathetic ennui....
FEATURES
May 4, 1999
Be a 4Kids DetectiveVisit these Web sites to find the answers, then go to http://www.4Kids.org/detectives/How many years old is the whale Metompkin? (Go to http://whale.wheelock.edu .)For my money, Step 1 of financial planning is?When did the area become Rocky Mountain National Park?GO GREENWhether you've got money on the mind or are hoping to watch your savings grow for the future, Moneyopolis is the ultimate site for cash-smart kids. Bring your piggybank out to http://www.moneyopolis.org/ and hang with other kids as you learn about managing your hard-earned dollars and cents.
FEATURES
By Patricia Meisol | March 5, 2004
Who knew a dispute about the Continental Divide could hang up the Maryland state budget? Who knew Maryland even had a Continental Divide? It was a Tuesday, early in the morning before most things start in this town, and Republican senators had invited the new secretary of the environment, Ken Philbrick, to explain the $30 annual fee on water bills the governor proposes. Money from the "flush tax" will help replace old sewage plants whose waste is leaking into the Chesapeake Bay. When Sen. John Hafer's turn came to speak, you could hear the indignation in his voice.
TRAVEL
By Jude Broderson and Jude Broderson,Special to the Sun | February 4, 2001
Have you ever peered off a mountain trail or gazed at a sunset and thought, "That can't be real. Those set designers really did a good job"? If you've been to Glacier National Park in northern Montana, you know what I'm talking about. The first time I pulled into Many Glacier Lodge in the middle of the park under the Continental Divide, I had no doubt that the whole setting was a movie backdrop, from shimmering Grinell Lake to the Austrian-style lodges. I turned to my buddy and said, "It's going to be a long summer acclimating to that view as our back yard."
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 19, 1999
GEORGETOWN, Colo. -- Next weekend, skiers here are to inaugurate the world's highest chairlift. Whisking 1,200 skiers an hour to a 12,700-foot ridge, the lift will offer sweeping views of the Rockies and challenging runs down the Continental Divide.But in a sign of changing times in the nation's most popular skiing state, a Colorado environmentalist is suing, alleging that Loveland Ski Area, the owner of the lift, has violated its federal permit for building on National Forest Service land.
FEATURES
By Eileen Ogintz and Eileen Ogintz,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | April 2, 1995
Peanut-butter sandwiches never tasted so good. We'd hiked uphill nearly five miles in the middle of Glacier National Park for the privilege of eating those sandwiches beside the famed Grinnell Glacier in Montana.It was worth every arduous step. Along the trail, Matt, Reggie and Melanie munched on huckleberries they'd picked right off the vines, watched mountain goats nimbly climb the cliffs and tried to guess the names of the amazing array of wildflowers we saw -- red Indian paintbrush, yellow monkey-flowers, purple sky pilots among them.
FEATURES
By Alan Lester and Alan Lester,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 11, 1998
"This valley is so beautiful that people seeing it will never be happy anywhere else and will always return." -- Arapaho Chief NiwotYou can sit atop a rock formation on the shores of Gold Lake in Ward, Colo., and almost feel Chief Niwot's presence. He was right. The view of the Continental Divide, dominated by the majestic slopes of Arapaho Mountain, is breathtaking. The cold mountain air sits crisply on your face, and the ice-blue skies are laced with clouds. Chief Niwot's curse, as the locals refer to his now famous quote, brings me back to Boulder, Colo.
TRAVEL
By HAL SMITH and HAL SMITH,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 7, 2004
If the Appalachian Mountains -- the Eastern Continental Divide -- hadn't deterred settlers from exploring east Tennessee, the Cumberland Plateau might not be as wildly beautiful and unpeopled as it is now. The plateau, averaging about 40 miles wide, is a band of highlands 2,000 feet high that runs across the state, north-south, paralleling the mountains to the east. The altitude ensures cool summers, yet the winters are mild. Mostly family farms and hardwood forests, the Cumberland Plateau is the largest timbered plateau in the United States, laced with two-lane roads that knife through cleared fields edged with kudzu and dotted with occasional signs proclaiming the Gospel.
FEATURES
By Patricia Meisol | March 5, 2004
Who knew a dispute about the Continental Divide could hang up the Maryland state budget? Who knew Maryland even had a Continental Divide? It was a Tuesday, early in the morning before most things start in this town, and Republican senators had invited the new secretary of the environment, Ken Philbrick, to explain the $30 annual fee on water bills the governor proposes. Money from the "flush tax" will help replace old sewage plants whose waste is leaking into the Chesapeake Bay. When Sen. John Hafer's turn came to speak, you could hear the indignation in his voice.
TRAVEL
By Mike Morris and Mike Morris,Sun Staff | November 3, 2002
Years ago, travel writer Cindy Ross would bring Appalachian Trail hikers to her rustic home in central Pennsylvania near the trail and cook them a warm dinner. In 1980, she brought back her future husband, a shy 19-year-old hiker, and fed him venison from a deer she had shot earlier that week. The two got together a few years later to hike the Pacific Crest Trail, and they married in 1983. By the early 1990s, the outdoor enthusiasts were raising two children, Bryce and Sierra (both named after national parks)
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | August 29, 2001
So just where is this "heartland" President Bush has been touring during his summer vacation? He's heralded the values of the heartland from the banks of the Susquehanna about 150 miles north of Baltimore all the way to Albuquerque, N.M., which is a pretty big heart even for a barrel-chested country like the United States. "The strength of our country is in the heartland," the president told an Aug. 13 news conference at his ranch in Crawford, Texas. Nobody would argue with the Little League World Series in Williamsport, Pa., being in the heartland of the American mind - even if a team from Japan won this year.
TRAVEL
By Jude Broderson and Jude Broderson,Special to the Sun | February 4, 2001
Have you ever peered off a mountain trail or gazed at a sunset and thought, "That can't be real. Those set designers really did a good job"? If you've been to Glacier National Park in northern Montana, you know what I'm talking about. The first time I pulled into Many Glacier Lodge in the middle of the park under the Continental Divide, I had no doubt that the whole setting was a movie backdrop, from shimmering Grinell Lake to the Austrian-style lodges. I turned to my buddy and said, "It's going to be a long summer acclimating to that view as our back yard."
TRAVEL
May 14, 2000
MY BEST SHOT Northern light Greg Poirier, Ellicott City Maine's "Acadia National Park has many scenic areas. This is the lighthouse at Bass Harbor Head. My wife had tired of how long it was taking for me to take this picture -- I was waiting for the sailboat to get in the shot." A MEMORABLE PLACE By Keith Krejei Special to the Sun Walking in wild Wyoming In the middle of Wyoming's vast plains is a mountain paradise that only a fortunate few know about. Picture an expansive world above the tree line, towering granite peaks with glaciers, hundreds of alpine lakes, and a sense of solitude that is unparalleled by any other wilderness area in the country.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sarah Schaffer and Sarah Schaffer,SUN STAFF | July 15, 2004
This stuff came out of the can spoiled. The schtick's ... been ruined since I came up with it," reported mopy comic Neil Hamburger, as he called from Los Angeles to talk about his act. Currently playing the nation's rock clubs and, he says, the occasional casino or "second-tier" pizza parlor, Hamburger indeed covers bizarre and boring topics - from candy fillings to kangaroos - delivering each sorry punchline with a heavy dose of pathetic ennui....
TRAVEL
May 14, 2000
MY BEST SHOT Northern light Greg Poirier, Ellicott City Maine's "Acadia National Park has many scenic areas. This is the lighthouse at Bass Harbor Head. My wife had tired of how long it was taking for me to take this picture -- I was waiting for the sailboat to get in the shot." A MEMORABLE PLACE By Keith Krejei Special to the Sun Walking in wild Wyoming In the middle of Wyoming's vast plains is a mountain paradise that only a fortunate few know about. Picture an expansive world above the tree line, towering granite peaks with glaciers, hundreds of alpine lakes, and a sense of solitude that is unparalleled by any other wilderness area in the country.
FEATURES
May 4, 1999
Be a 4Kids DetectiveVisit these Web sites to find the answers, then go to http://www.4Kids.org/detectives/How many years old is the whale Metompkin? (Go to http://whale.wheelock.edu .)For my money, Step 1 of financial planning is?When did the area become Rocky Mountain National Park?GO GREENWhether you've got money on the mind or are hoping to watch your savings grow for the future, Moneyopolis is the ultimate site for cash-smart kids. Bring your piggybank out to http://www.moneyopolis.org/ and hang with other kids as you learn about managing your hard-earned dollars and cents.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 19, 1999
GEORGETOWN, Colo. -- Next weekend, skiers here are to inaugurate the world's highest chairlift. Whisking 1,200 skiers an hour to a 12,700-foot ridge, the lift will offer sweeping views of the Rockies and challenging runs down the Continental Divide.But in a sign of changing times in the nation's most popular skiing state, a Colorado environmentalist is suing, alleging that Loveland Ski Area, the owner of the lift, has violated its federal permit for building on National Forest Service land.
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