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By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 27, 2012
Several readers wrote me about last week's column that told the story of federal Judge Sarah Tilghman Hughes, a Baltimorean who swore in Lyndon B. Johnson as president aboard Air Force One after the assassination of John F. Kennedy on Nov. 22, 1963. They pointed out that Hughes' Maryland lineage included Tench Tilghman, who, like Hughes, had been at the center of one of history's most momentous events. Tilghman, Revolutionary War aide-de-camp to Gen. George Washington and one of Maryland's most famous patriots, carried the news of the British surrender in 1781 at Yorktown, Va., to the Continental Congress meeting in Philadelphia, in a ride that has been compared as being second only to that of Paul Revere.
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By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | January 9, 2014
"Many consider John Hanson, who was John Hanson Briscoe's relative and for whom he was named, as being the first president of the United States, and not George Washington," said Rep. Steny H. Hoyer, who was discussing the recent death of Briscoe, his longtime friend and former speaker of the Maryland House of Delegates. And regarding John Hanson's claim to being the first president, Hoyer is technically right. Hanson was elected the first president of the Continental Congress under the Articles of Confederation in 1781, several years before George Washington took the role under the newly formed United States.
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Letter to The Record and The Aegis | July 9, 2013
Editor: At this time of year, I am reminded of an American hero, Caesar Rodney, and his midnight ride for independence. Although Caesar Rodney is unfortunately forgotten by many teachers and textbook writers today, his midnight ride to Philadelphia forever changed American history; as he cast the tie-breaking vote to deliver us independence from Great Britain. The following briefly recounts Founding Father Caesar Rodney's important role in the fight for American Independence.
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Letter to The Record and The Aegis | July 9, 2013
Editor: At this time of year, I am reminded of an American hero, Caesar Rodney, and his midnight ride for independence. Although Caesar Rodney is unfortunately forgotten by many teachers and textbook writers today, his midnight ride to Philadelphia forever changed American history; as he cast the tie-breaking vote to deliver us independence from Great Britain. The following briefly recounts Founding Father Caesar Rodney's important role in the fight for American Independence.
FEATURES
By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,SUN STAFF | May 19, 1996
If the thundering "vroom-vroom" of the Harley-Davidson factory leaves you yearning for more placid entertainment, York County has other attractions that should fit the bill.Antiques for one. The town of Shrewsbury just south of the city of York offers multiple dealers in the Antique Center as well as other shops. Nearby Red Lion and Loganville also have several antiques dealers.If you're interested in more contemporary fare, you may want to stop in on some of the many craftsmen who have located inYork County and opened their studios and workshops to visitors.
NEWS
September 29, 1993
* Peter De Vries, 83, a New Yorker writer who parodied everything from feminism to religion and everyone from fellow suburbanites to fellow authors, died Tuesday. Among his 26 novels was "The Tunnel of Love," which was also made into a hit Broadway play and a movie.* Michael Harvey, 49, a theatrical producer and real estate investor, died of AIDS Thursday at his home in Manhattan. Among his Broadway and Off Broadway productions and co-productions were "The Grass Harp" (1971); "Why Hannah's Skirt Won't Stay Down" (1974)
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder | June 14, 1991
NEW YORK -- Remember the man who bought a $4 painting at a flea market only to discover a copy of the Declaration of Independence tucked inside?It sold at auction for $2.42 million yesterday.An Atlanta art investment company cast the winning bid for the document, one of only 24 known copies printed the night of July 4, 1776, to disseminate news of the Continental Congress' revolutionary act of independence.The cost, which includes a 10 percent commission to Sotheby's auction house, was the highest price ever paid for printed Americana.
NEWS
By THEO LIPPMAN JR | April 13, 1992
HAPPY BIRTHDAY to Thomas Jefferson. The calendar on the wall said April 2 when he arrived in 1743, but the calendar Americans use was subsequently changed so that April 13 became the day we remember him.If we remember him at all. Some of us do. But many of us remember a sort of idealized TJ and a sort of idealized America of his times. That is the way of Americans. Nostalgia is a national trait.Jerry Brown refers to Thomas Jefferson often. He says present day Washington is awful, and he would like to return to the simpler, republican (with a small r)
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz, The Baltimore Sun | March 28, 2011
John Hanson's spot in the U.S. Capitol is secure, but Harriet Tubman's chances of securing one are spotty. The General Assembly has been weighing whether to swap in Tubman, who helped slaves travel to freedom on the Underground Railroad, for Hanson, a Southern Maryland merchant and former president of the Continental Congress, in the National Statuary Hall Collection. Each state is allowed only two statues in the collection. Maryland has been represented since 1903 by Hanson and Charles Carroll of Carrollton, the only Roman Catholic signer of the Declaration of Independence.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | January 9, 2014
"Many consider John Hanson, who was John Hanson Briscoe's relative and for whom he was named, as being the first president of the United States, and not George Washington," said Rep. Steny H. Hoyer, who was discussing the recent death of Briscoe, his longtime friend and former speaker of the Maryland House of Delegates. And regarding John Hanson's claim to being the first president, Hoyer is technically right. Hanson was elected the first president of the Continental Congress under the Articles of Confederation in 1781, several years before George Washington took the role under the newly formed United States.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson, For The Baltimore Sun | March 28, 2013
Congress' inability to agree on matters of import isn't exactly a new phenomenon, but the Colonial Players' current production of the musical "1776" reminds us that fiery debate has been a part of our nation from the outset. Sherman Edwards' 1969 Tony Award winner for best musical, with book by Peter Stone, chronicles the vote for independence by the Continental Congress in the summer of 1776. Director Beth Terranova says the musical reveals "the enormity of the task our founding fathers set out for themselves.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | February 28, 2013
A fledgling organization devoted to the history of the Continental Congress — and creating a permanent home in Annapolis for examining that period in American history — took steps last week toward its goal. The Annapolis Continental Congress Society announced that it will hold its second festival Sept. 14-18 in the city, according to Mark Croatti, director of the organization. The first festival was held last year. In addition, a 16-member board of directors of the National Continental Congress Center Founders' Association has been formed with the goal of finding a permanent home for the organization.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | November 21, 2012
A fledgling organization dedicated to the Continental Congress is bringing three days of lectures along with historic documents and short films to Annapolis, as it seeks to find a permanent home in the city. Among the items of historic note in the traveling exhibit will be a Treaty of Paris proclamation that formally ended the American Revolution; it was ratified and signed in Annapolis on Jan. 14, 1784. The Continental Congress Festival will mark the document's first return to Annapolis, said Mark Croatti, the Continental Congress Society's director.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 27, 2012
Several readers wrote me about last week's column that told the story of federal Judge Sarah Tilghman Hughes, a Baltimorean who swore in Lyndon B. Johnson as president aboard Air Force One after the assassination of John F. Kennedy on Nov. 22, 1963. They pointed out that Hughes' Maryland lineage included Tench Tilghman, who, like Hughes, had been at the center of one of history's most momentous events. Tilghman, Revolutionary War aide-de-camp to Gen. George Washington and one of Maryland's most famous patriots, carried the news of the British surrender in 1781 at Yorktown, Va., to the Continental Congress meeting in Philadelphia, in a ride that has been compared as being second only to that of Paul Revere.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz, The Baltimore Sun | March 28, 2011
John Hanson's spot in the U.S. Capitol is secure, but Harriet Tubman's chances of securing one are spotty. The General Assembly has been weighing whether to swap in Tubman, who helped slaves travel to freedom on the Underground Railroad, for Hanson, a Southern Maryland merchant and former president of the Continental Congress, in the National Statuary Hall Collection. Each state is allowed only two statues in the collection. Maryland has been represented since 1903 by Hanson and Charles Carroll of Carrollton, the only Roman Catholic signer of the Declaration of Independence.
FEATURES
By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,SUN STAFF | May 19, 1996
If the thundering "vroom-vroom" of the Harley-Davidson factory leaves you yearning for more placid entertainment, York County has other attractions that should fit the bill.Antiques for one. The town of Shrewsbury just south of the city of York offers multiple dealers in the Antique Center as well as other shops. Nearby Red Lion and Loganville also have several antiques dealers.If you're interested in more contemporary fare, you may want to stop in on some of the many craftsmen who have located inYork County and opened their studios and workshops to visitors.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson, For The Baltimore Sun | March 28, 2013
Congress' inability to agree on matters of import isn't exactly a new phenomenon, but the Colonial Players' current production of the musical "1776" reminds us that fiery debate has been a part of our nation from the outset. Sherman Edwards' 1969 Tony Award winner for best musical, with book by Peter Stone, chronicles the vote for independence by the Continental Congress in the summer of 1776. Director Beth Terranova says the musical reveals "the enormity of the task our founding fathers set out for themselves.
NEWS
By William Safire | September 17, 1991
THE MOMENT has come for the president of the United States to step up to his obligation to form and articulate U.S. foreign policy in the wake of the death of communism and the breakup of the Soviet Union. The forum is the U.N. session opening this week in New York.The need for a substantive speech, now scheduled for Monday, Sept. 23, is all the more pressing because his last attempt -- his dismaying "Chicken Kiev" speech in Ukraine on Aug. 1 -- betrayed a misconceptual framework.That was the first address by a U.S. president that had to be followed by an op-ed article by his national security adviser to explain that what he said was not what he meant.
NEWS
September 29, 1993
* Peter De Vries, 83, a New Yorker writer who parodied everything from feminism to religion and everyone from fellow suburbanites to fellow authors, died Tuesday. Among his 26 novels was "The Tunnel of Love," which was also made into a hit Broadway play and a movie.* Michael Harvey, 49, a theatrical producer and real estate investor, died of AIDS Thursday at his home in Manhattan. Among his Broadway and Off Broadway productions and co-productions were "The Grass Harp" (1971); "Why Hannah's Skirt Won't Stay Down" (1974)
NEWS
By THEO LIPPMAN JR | April 13, 1992
HAPPY BIRTHDAY to Thomas Jefferson. The calendar on the wall said April 2 when he arrived in 1743, but the calendar Americans use was subsequently changed so that April 13 became the day we remember him.If we remember him at all. Some of us do. But many of us remember a sort of idealized TJ and a sort of idealized America of his times. That is the way of Americans. Nostalgia is a national trait.Jerry Brown refers to Thomas Jefferson often. He says present day Washington is awful, and he would like to return to the simpler, republican (with a small r)
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