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By Lauren Shull and Lauren Shull,Sun reporter | February 17, 2008
George Washington may be the most popular American in history. He adorns the quarter and the dollar bill, lends his name to the national capital and several prominent universities and stares out from Mount Rushmore in a 60-foot-high carving. And he is honored with a federal holiday, the third Monday in February. Although Washington is more often associated with Virginia, where he was born and died, he had connections to Maryland while Annapolis was the capital of the newly created United States and many of his acquaintances worked in the State House.
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NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2010
As he prepared to resign his commission as commander-in-chief of the Continental Army, Gen. George Washington traveled to Annapolis and while staying at Mann's Tavern, put his thoughts on paper. His Dec. 23, 1783 address to Congress, which was then meeting in the Old Senate Chamber in what is today the State House, concluded with a farewell to public life. Preparing to resign his commission as the Continental Army's commander in chief, Gen. George Washington put his thoughts on paper while staying at Mann's Tavern in Annapolis.
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FEATURES
June 15, 2002
1775: The Second Continental Congress voted unanimously to appoint George Washington head of the Continental Army. 1944: American forces began their successful invasion of Saipan during World War II. Meanwhile, B-29 Superfortresses made their first raids on Japan. Associated Press
NEWS
By Laura Smitherman and Laura Smitherman,laura.smitherman@baltsun.com | December 23, 2008
The State House is reopening after an eight-month, $10 million renovation, though planners are far from completing the wholesale redesign - and a more visitor-friendly experience - they envision for the historic building. Construction crews have repaired an aging heating and cooling system, updated a plumbing system that was in danger of rupturing and replaced unsafe electrical wiring. With that work in the final stages, moving trucks pulled around State Circle to unload boxes and furniture yesterday, and Gov. Martin O'Malley was in the building.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Steve Grant and Steve Grant,HARTFORD COURANT | June 12, 2005
It is probably fair to say that the fame of the Revolutionary War patriot Nathan Hale rests on a single quote, though it was a beauty, a veritable sound bite for the ages: "I only regret that I have but one life to lose for my country." Hale, whose 250th birthday is being marked this year, is supposed to have uttered those words shortly before he was hanged by the British in 1776 as a spy for the Continental Army. "Without it, would we even know he existed?" asks Richard E. Mooney, who is writing a new biography of Hale.
NEWS
By John Goodspeed | August 15, 1994
The Price of Nationhood: the American Revolution in Charles County. W.W. Norton and Co. 388 pages. $17. THIS BOOK has already drawn praise -- and deserves it -- foits unusual angle on the American Revolution. It tells the story of that struggle from the standpoint of plain folks and their not very well-known leaders in a remote area, Charles County, Md., instead of from the standpoint of the immortal Minutemen in New England and our major forefathers in the big cities.I think, though, an even more admirable characteristic of Jean Lee's little history is the quality of its prose.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 4, 1996
DENVER -- In a cavernous sculpture studio here, Ed Dwight tweaked wax into a colonial tricorn hat, filling out the Continental Army uniform of a soldier with markedly African features.With each wax musket and powder horn, a maquette is taking shape of a memorial to the 5,000 black soldiers and sailors who fought for colonial America's freedom -- and for their own.The Black Revolutionary War Patriots Memorial would be the first permanent tribute to black people on the National Mall in Washington.
NEWS
By Bradley Olson and Bradley Olson,Sun reporter | April 11, 2008
Maryland's State House always undergoes a drastic transformation in April, when all the adrenaline that flowed through the halls during the General Assembly session is replaced, overnight, by silence. But with the national historic landmark closed to visitors and workers until January, the mood this year is almost funerary. Moving trucks surround the centuries-old building as workers clean out their offices, exhuming a sea of paper, the detritus of frenzied lawmaking built up year after year, to be boxed up or recycled.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2010
As he prepared to resign his commission as commander-in-chief of the Continental Army, Gen. George Washington traveled to Annapolis and while staying at Mann's Tavern, put his thoughts on paper. His Dec. 23, 1783 address to Congress, which was then meeting in the Old Senate Chamber in what is today the State House, concluded with a farewell to public life. Preparing to resign his commission as the Continental Army's commander in chief, Gen. George Washington put his thoughts on paper while staying at Mann's Tavern in Annapolis.
TRAVEL
By Charles W. Mitchell and By Charles W. Mitchell,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 18, 2001
In eastern Pennsylvania, about 20 miles west of Philadelphia, lies Valley Forge, a potent symbol of America's struggle for independence. Here amid the rolling hills was the site of the Continental Army's 1777-1778 winter camp, during the third year of the American Revolution. Valley Forge was no conventional battlefield. America's enemies there were hunger, cold and disease, and they attacked relentlessly from December into the following spring. "The whole army is sick and crawling with vermin," complained an officer in March 1778.
NEWS
By Bradley Olson and Bradley Olson,Sun reporter | April 11, 2008
Maryland's State House always undergoes a drastic transformation in April, when all the adrenaline that flowed through the halls during the General Assembly session is replaced, overnight, by silence. But with the national historic landmark closed to visitors and workers until January, the mood this year is almost funerary. Moving trucks surround the centuries-old building as workers clean out their offices, exhuming a sea of paper, the detritus of frenzied lawmaking built up year after year, to be boxed up or recycled.
NEWS
By Lauren Shull and Lauren Shull,Sun reporter | February 17, 2008
George Washington may be the most popular American in history. He adorns the quarter and the dollar bill, lends his name to the national capital and several prominent universities and stares out from Mount Rushmore in a 60-foot-high carving. And he is honored with a federal holiday, the third Monday in February. Although Washington is more often associated with Virginia, where he was born and died, he had connections to Maryland while Annapolis was the capital of the newly created United States and many of his acquaintances worked in the State House.
NEWS
By Nia-Malika Henderson and Nia-Malika Henderson,sun reporter | January 2, 2007
A short walk from Annapolis City Dock, where untold thousands of slaves were bought and sold, a free black man named John T. Maynard took a shed and made it a home. It was 1847, and over the years, through the Civil War and Reconstruction, Maynard added a full second story, a porch, a brick chimney and furnished it with dozens of mahogany chairs, two feather beds and a marble-topped table. He lived there, right across from City Hall, with his wife -- whose freedom he bought -- their three children and other relatives.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Steve Grant and Steve Grant,HARTFORD COURANT | June 12, 2005
It is probably fair to say that the fame of the Revolutionary War patriot Nathan Hale rests on a single quote, though it was a beauty, a veritable sound bite for the ages: "I only regret that I have but one life to lose for my country." Hale, whose 250th birthday is being marked this year, is supposed to have uttered those words shortly before he was hanged by the British in 1776 as a spy for the Continental Army. "Without it, would we even know he existed?" asks Richard E. Mooney, who is writing a new biography of Hale.
FEATURES
June 15, 2002
1775: The Second Continental Congress voted unanimously to appoint George Washington head of the Continental Army. 1944: American forces began their successful invasion of Saipan during World War II. Meanwhile, B-29 Superfortresses made their first raids on Japan. Associated Press
TRAVEL
By Charles W. Mitchell and By Charles W. Mitchell,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 18, 2001
In eastern Pennsylvania, about 20 miles west of Philadelphia, lies Valley Forge, a potent symbol of America's struggle for independence. Here amid the rolling hills was the site of the Continental Army's 1777-1778 winter camp, during the third year of the American Revolution. Valley Forge was no conventional battlefield. America's enemies there were hunger, cold and disease, and they attacked relentlessly from December into the following spring. "The whole army is sick and crawling with vermin," complained an officer in March 1778.
NEWS
By Laura Smitherman and Laura Smitherman,laura.smitherman@baltsun.com | December 23, 2008
The State House is reopening after an eight-month, $10 million renovation, though planners are far from completing the wholesale redesign - and a more visitor-friendly experience - they envision for the historic building. Construction crews have repaired an aging heating and cooling system, updated a plumbing system that was in danger of rupturing and replaced unsafe electrical wiring. With that work in the final stages, moving trucks pulled around State Circle to unload boxes and furniture yesterday, and Gov. Martin O'Malley was in the building.
NEWS
By George F. Will | February 22, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Suppose. Suppose the car had hit the pedestrian slightly harder.What car? The one on Fifth Avenue the evening of Dec. 13, 1931, when an English politician on a lecture tour momentarily forgot the American rules of the road and looked the wrong way when stepping into the street.Winston Churchill could have died.Then, perhaps in 1940 or 1941, a prime minister less resolute and inspiriting than Churchill might have chosen to come to terms with Germany before Hitler attacked the Soviet Union.
TRAVEL
By Eileen Ogintz and Eileen Ogintz,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 25, 1999
The kids looked dubious. Six soldiers shared that flimsy tent smaller than a pup tent?They didn't have sleeping bags either. Revolutionary War soldiers were assigned just one big blanket per tent: They'd cut it so each man got a piece, explained Bill Blair, chief interpreter for the Yorktown Victory Center museum, as he stood in the "military encampment."He invited the kids to lie down on the straw, as the soldiers did, sleeping in shifts. Most barely out of their teens, he explained, they ate watery stew, hard biscuits and whatever else they could find, getting sick often, with only herbal remedies to relieve their symptoms.
NEWS
By George F. Will | February 22, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Suppose. Suppose the car had hit the pedestrian slightly harder.What car? The one on Fifth Avenue the evening of Dec. 13, 1931, when an English politician on a lecture tour momentarily forgot the American rules of the road and looked the wrong way when stepping into the street.Winston Churchill could have died.Then, perhaps in 1940 or 1941, a prime minister less resolute and inspiriting than Churchill might have chosen to come to terms with Germany before Hitler attacked the Soviet Union.
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