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By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,Washington Bureau of The Sun | March 6, 1995
WASHINGTON -- After decades of meddling and of humanitarian rescues, the United States and Europe are freezing or cutting back aid programs for Africa and looking to that troubled continent to solve its problems on its own.The one-two shock of a failed United Nations peacekeeping mission in Somalia and of genocide that the world proved helpless to stop in Rwanda has left the major aid nations all but drained of sympathy, patience and money. Even businesses are wary of Africa: They have found better trading partners and faster-growing markets elsewhere in the developing world.
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NEWS
August 4, 2014
The U.S.-Africa Leaders Summit that officially opened today in Washington is as notable for what isn't on the agenda as for what is. The meeting between President Barack Obama and more than 40 African heads of state has been billed as forum for talks on security issues, foreign investment and economic development on the continent. But so far, at least, the recent outbreak of deadly Ebola virus in three African nations has remained absent from the official agenda. Mr. Obama needs to take this opportunity to strengthen cooperation between the U.S. and its African partners in efforts to bring the epidemic under control and provide the resources needed to prevent its spread.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,Sun Book Editor | June 12, 2005
Acts of Faith By Philip Caputo. Alfred A. Knopf. 669 pages. $26.95. In the prologue to Philip Caputo's sprawling, harrowing novel, Acts of Faith, one of the characters, speaking to a newcomer to the continent, refers cryptically to "the synonymousness of God and the Devil in Africa." Distinctions, like idealism, disappear in Caputo's own misery-strewn Heart of Darkness. Characters who begin as one sort of person morph into something else entirely, rationalizing transformations they would once have considered appalling.
NEWS
February 5, 2014
Doris Ligon may be Baltimore born and bred, but she can't seem to get her mind off Africa. "I was in my 30s before I heard anything positive about Africa," recalls Ligon, 77, who, along with her late husband, Claude, opened the African Art Museum of Maryland in Columbia in 1980. Since 2011, the museum has held forth closer to Laurel, in cozy space in Maple Lawn, just off the lobby of the Baltimore-Washington Conference of the United Methodist Church. "In those days, it was called the Dark Continent.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 30, 1998
GABORONE, Botswana -- President Clinton traveled yesterday from Africa's youngest democracy to its oldest, where he praised the government and people of Botswana as a model for the rest of the continent for 30 years."
NEWS
By Kevin Baxter, Tribune newspapers | June 14, 2010
PRETORIA, South Africa — The first World Cup on African soil was meant to highlight the continent's growth as a soccer power. But it has also focused a spotlight on an area where Africa is lagging — the coaching ranks. Although six of the 32 nations in this year's tournament are from Africa, Algeria's Rabah Saadane is the only coach who was born there. In fact, Sunday's Serbia-Ghana match alone had twice as many coaches from Yugoslavia, a country that no longer exists, as the entire World Cup has coaches from Africa, the world's second-most populous continent.
NEWS
By Robyn Dixon and Robyn Dixon,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 7, 2007
PRETORIA, SOUTH AFRICA -- Chinese President Hu Jintao pledged to boost his country's booming relationship with Africa yesterday, as he brought a 12-day Africa tour to the continent's economic powerhouse. Hu's trip, in which he has lavished promises of economic partnership on a half-dozen nations but steered clear of controversial political issues, has become a symbol of China's intense courtship of Africa. The growing relationship has been viewed with trepidation by many in the West. U.S. officials, who see Africa as an alternative source of oil to the Middle East, are worried particularly about competition with China for the continent's resources.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sarah Schaffer and Sarah Schaffer,SUN STAFF | November 20, 2003
Charged with capturing the essence of a continent in a single day, nearly 100 photojournalists journeyed to Africa last winter. The group spread out and began shooting from the land's 53 countries on Feb. 28. Over the course of that day and night, they ventured to sparsely populated countryside, colorful markets, lush jungles and bustling cities, all the while framing the varied landscapes and cultural practices in their lenses. They spent time in schools, stores and cafes, grabbing candid images that showed how people worked and played.
NEWS
May 13, 2000
AMERICANS are said not to care much about Africa any more. The White House is moaning about its inability to find a consituency for any Africa policy at all. Congress did just pass a bill to open access to U.S. markets for manufactures, expecially textiles, from the poorest countries. But there is little support for making AIDS medicines available at prices that are at all relevant to the hardest-hit countries. Apparently less for debt relief. And little enthusiasm for diplomatic or logistic intervention -- much less troops -- to curb bloodshed in Sudan or Congo or Angola or Sierra Leone or between Ethiopia and Eritrea.
NEWS
March 27, 1998
PRESIDENT Clinton's epochal tour of Africa is a welcome reminder of the importance of that continent, its hopes and problems.The trip is primarily symbolic. Even the bits of aid promised are more token than substance. But symbolism is one of a president's more effective tools.The most important gesture so far has been Mr. Clinton's promise in Rwanda of a more aggressive U.S. stance in behalf of human rights where American policy can make a difference. He was at his most eloquent in condemning his own refusal to intervene in the genocide of 1994.
NEWS
By Kelly Virginia Phelan | December 11, 2013
Africa is a continent, not a country. However, most of the world refers to Africa as one collective, with little attention paid toward borders; a practice most Africans resent. And it has never been quite as prevalent as in the last few days since Nelson Mandela's passing. I am an American citizen who is a resident of Botswana. I travel extensively throughout Africa and routinely meet all nationalities and classes of Africans. I witness firsthand the resentment toward uninformed Westerners and foreign media who make generalizations about the continent based on a single data point.
HEALTH
By Kit Waskom Pollard, For The Baltimore Sun | June 20, 2013
When Steve Neibergall crosses the finish line at the Safaricom Marathon in Kenya on June 29, he will have finished more than just a 26.2-mile race. The Kenya event will be the 100th marathon the 52-year-old Annapolis resident has completed since he started running the races in 2005. He has run marathons in all 50 states; when he finishes Kenya, he will also have run on all seven continents. "I'm a very goal-oriented person," says Neibergall, president of the eastern division of Safeway.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | February 23, 2013
Errol Webber has an unfair advantage when it comes to Oscar parties. He actually has an Oscar, handed out on stage during an Academy Awards ceremony. And it'll be there for all his guests to admire, pose with any maybe even hold for a few seconds when Webber hosts his first Oscar party Sunday night. "I don't think there are many actual Oscars in Baltimore right now," says Webber, who was the cinematographer on the 2010 Oscar-winning documentary "Music by Prudence.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | July 30, 2012
For years, presidents and presidential hopefuls have gone abroad to cast themselves as knowledgeable on world affairs, counting on friendly receptions wherever they go as a respite from the slings and arrows they routinely encounter in campaigning at home. They used to tour what was known as "the 3-I League" - for Ireland, Italy and Israel - in a naked appeal to three of the more prominent ethnic constituencies here, particularly in the Democratic Party. How many votes they got in November for their wanderings was hard to determine, but off they went anyway.
NEWS
By Peter Morici | May 14, 2012
Europe's single currency is a bust. With unemployment reaching depression levels in the Mediterranean states, time has long passed to negotiate an orderly return to national currencies. Euro advocates argue a single currency is essential for creating a unified continental economy, and the euro is falling short of expectations because monetary union was initiated without fiscal union - namely, sovereign taxing and spending authority for Brussels. Those arguments are little more than polemics from politicians, public servants and pundits who have staked their reputations and careers on a failed economic idea.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey, The Baltimore Sun | August 15, 2010
A host of new vendors sold goods at this year's Africa festival, but the deluge on Sunday meant few Baltimoreans wandered through the usually packed event. "The people from Baltimore just did not come out," complained Aghieghid Singapore, who traveled from New York City to sell Nigerian shea butter, a balm he said would fade the deepest scars within two weeks. He complimented the festival organizers for attracting regional vendors and even an international entertainer. For the past four years Baltimore has sponsored the event, officially called FestAfrica, as a part of a series of ethnic festivals in the city.
NEWS
November 30, 1998
OF ALL THE world's continents, Africa has the least-developed press and electronic media. That's why a 24-hour satellite television channel exclusively devoted to its news and development is such a breakthrough.So fragile is Africa's information infrastructure that in most cases even its own media rely on reporting from the large Western news agencies. In contrast, SABC Africa will have "Africans reporting Africa to Africa," editor Allister Sparks promises.Launched by the state-owned South African Broadcasting Corp.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 19, 2003
The Library of Congress announced yesterday that it had raised the $10 million needed to complete the purchase of the only surviving copy of the 1507 world map that named America. Library officials said the map was the most expensive single item ever acquired by the institution and would almost immediately be displayed in Washington. It will be the centerpiece of the library's exhibition to commemorate the bicentennial of the Lewis and Clark expedition. "The purchase marks the culmination of an effort that has extended over many decades to bring this unique historical document to America," said James H. Billington, the librarian of Congress, in a statement announcing the acquisition.
NEWS
By Kevin Baxter, Tribune newspapers | June 29, 2010
JOHANNESBURG — The next World Cup will be played in South America. Most of the rest of this one will be played by South America. Even before Brazil's 3-0 rout of Chile on Monday at Ellis Park, South American teams were guaranteed spots in three of the four quarterfinals. And if Paraguay beats Japan in its second-round game Tuesday afternoon, four South American teams will be among the final eight. That leaves open the possibility of all-South American semifinals — which has never happened — and an all-South American final, which hasn't happened in 60 years.
NEWS
By Kevin Baxter, Tribune Newspapers | June 20, 2010
PRETORIA, South Africa — Nine days into the first World Cup on African soil, the Lost Continent has become the Loss Continent. A record six African teams were invited to this year's tournament, and through 11 games, they've combined for just one win — and that victory, by Ghana, came on a penalty kick after a questionable hand-ball call. The latest loss came Saturday night when winless Cameroon, expected to breeze through group play, fell to Denmark 2-1, becoming the first team officially eliminated from contention for a spot in the second round.
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