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Contested Elections

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NEWS
October 20, 1996
IF MARYLAND voters needed proof that subjecting sitting judges to contested elections is a bad idea, they should sample the strident rhetoric and hard-ball tactics of the judicial campaign now going on in Howard County. Not only do two sitting judges find themselves in the demeaning position of trying to dispense impartial justice while waging an expensive campaign, the county's residents also face the prospect -- regardless of who wins -- of standing before judges they campaigned against.
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NEWS
By Luke Lavoie, llavoie@tribune.com | May 1, 2014
One incumbent and two newcomers were elected to serve on the Columbia Council in contested races in the village dections held Saturday, April 26.  Newcomer Jeanne Ketley narrowly unseated longtime Town Center representative Suzanne Waller by a vote of 141-75. In Hickory Ridge, where a quorum was reached for the first time in recent years, incumbent Gregg Schwind defeated challenger Harry Schwarz, 189-147. Alan Klein will succeed long-serving Harper's Choice representative Cynthia Coyle, who did not seek re-election, after defeating newcomer Bob Fontaine by a vote of 196-179.
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NEWS
By Sara Engram | October 27, 1996
POLITICS IN THE selection of the state's chief judge? Of course. Give a governor or any other elected official appointment power over another branch of government, and politics will be part of the equation.And why not? Politics is a way of weighing competing interests, and winning an election gives a governor the right to weigh it his way -- or hers. So any carping that Gov. Parris N. Glendening may have factored his political interests into the appointment of the state's first African-American chief judge is beside the point.
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,Sun reporter | February 20, 2008
Barack Obama ran his winning streak to nine states yesterday with a double-digit victory over Hillary Clinton in Wisconsin that set the stage for potentially crucial primaries a week from Tuesday. Obama, 46, whose chances of becoming the Democratic nominee continue to brighten, was expected to add a 10th-consecutive state early today when caucus results were tallied in his native Hawaii. The Republican race, meanwhile, was nearing an end after John McCain won easily in Wisconsin. "I will be our party's nominee," declared the Arizona senator, 71, now positioned to clinch the nomination as early as March 4. McCain used his victory speech last night to criticize what he termed Obama's lack of experience in foreign policy.
NEWS
November 22, 1996
THE COMMISSION on the Future of Maryland's Courts didn't have a crystal ball to gaze into. But then it didn't need one, considering that the major trends affecting the courts are all too evident. Both the volume and variety of cases confronting Maryland's judges have increased dramatically in the past couple of decades.Meanwhile, courthouses face physical and operational challenges in providing access to the disabled, interpreters for non-English speakers, child care for those involved in or attending trials and non-public waiting areas for crime victims.
NEWS
February 26, 1992
In 1991, after a distinguished 20-year career in the law, capped by a seven-year tour as deputy attorney general of Maryland, Dennis M. Sweeney was appointed to the Circuit Court in Howard County. His decision to apply for the job was a commendable one. Many attorneys with his qualifications are reluctant to become Circuit Court judges because such judges can be challenged in elections.For example, that year, typically, the number of applicants for each vacancy in the state's judiciary was lower for Circuit Court judgeships than for any of the other three levels.
NEWS
February 24, 1996
OF THE THREE branches of government, the judiciary is the most insulated from voters. There's a reason -- the fair administration of justice demands a measure of detachment from daily political passions. States that require their judges to face election challenges can find themselves embroiled in unseemly scandals rooted in the fact that judges must solicit contributions to fund their campaigns. It's hard to be even-handed when you've got one hand out for help.In Maryland, only circuit court judges are subjected to contested elections.
NEWS
October 31, 1990
The key issues that will confront Anne Arundel County's delegation in the next General Assembly involve choices about the environment, growth and transportation.In the 30th District Senate contest, two-term incumbent Gerald Winegrad is easily the stronger candidate. In the House races, we support Democratic incumbent Del. John Astle and newcomer Edith Segree, an environmentalist with experience as legislative aide on the County Council. For the third seat, we recommend Aris Allen, a former Republican state senator and candidate for lieutenant governor.
NEWS
By Frank A. DeFilippo | September 30, 1993
WHILE most rubberneckers were fixated on Mayor Kurt Schmoke's departure from the governor's race, a number of ZTC equally important events were occurring backstage.What appeared until Mr. Schmoke's turn-about to be a tumultuous campaign year has, lickety-split, settled down to a fairly mannerly event. Both Democrats and Republicans will have contested elections for governor but not the divisive campaigns that Mr. Schmoke's presence would have induced.No question that the Democrats are the main beneficiaries, if for no other reason than that they outnumber Republicans 2-to-1.
NEWS
By Laura McCandlish and Laura McCandlish,Sun Reporter | April 22, 2007
In the race for Union Bridge mayor, former Town Councilman Scott W. Davis is challenging incumbent Bret D. Grossnickle, who was appointed when Perry L. Jones Jr. was elected to the Carroll County Board of Commissioners in 2002. Three men are also campaigning for two seats that are up for grabs on the five-member council, which currently has four female members. One of those seats belongs to Councilwoman Sarah Black, who has decided not to run for re-election. The council's only male, incumbent Donald D. Wilson, will face challengers John T. "Tommy" Hyde III and Edgar C. Wentz in the May 8 municipal nonpartisan election.
NEWS
By Liz Sly and Liz Sly,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | May 22, 2005
BAGHDAD, Iraq - Sunni political, religious and tribal leaders came together yesterday to form a new political front intended to represent the Sunni minority in drafting a new constitution and contesting the next round of elections in Iraq. More than 1,000 Sunnis crowded into the Engineering Club in Baghdad to declare the existence of the new front, formed under the auspices of three groups that led the Sunni boycott of January's elections: the Association of Muslim Scholars, the Iraqi Islamic Party and the Sunni Endowment, another religious body.
NEWS
By Lisa Goldberg and Lisa Goldberg,SUN STAFF | October 25, 2004
The two major party candidates in the race for the 2nd Congressional District seat are eager to talk about the war in Iraq. Not just about the right or wrong of waging a war there or the best exit strategy for the United States, but plane rides home for soldiers and a mother's daily jitters over the safety of a son who spent a year fighting in the war. Incumbent Rep. C.A. Dutch Ruppersberger's first term earned him his highest profile when he arranged for...
NEWS
By David L. Greene and David L. Greene,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 22, 2004
11 days until Election Day, Tuesday Nov. 2 HERSHEY, Pa. - The portrait of Sen. John Kerry that President Bush sketches in stump speeches could not be less flattering: Kerry is an aloof man, who says the Sept. 11 attacks didn't change him. He lacks moral clarity, saying he voted to support U.S. troops before deciding not to support them. And he shifts with political winds, saying he is a liberal who promotes conservative values. The picture reflects the Bush camp's strategy of turning the campaign's final days into a personality contest - in essence, a referendum on the challenger.
NEWS
By Laura Cadiz and Laura Cadiz,SUN STAFF | April 23, 2004
Thirty-two people are vying for seats on Columbia's 10 village boards in elections to be held today and tomorrow, but there isn't much competition. Only four villages - Hickory Ridge, Kings Contrivance, River Hill and Long Reach - have contested races. Wilde Lake and Oakland Mills have fewer candidates than open seats, and vacancies will be filled by appointments after the election. Owen Brown will not hold elections because it does not have a contested race. However, the elections are more competitive compared to last year, when only Oakland Mills had a contested race.
NEWS
By Laura Cadiz and Laura Cadiz,SUN STAFF | April 21, 2004
The often-fractious Columbia Council has been nearly evenly divided over contentious issues this term - leading to clashing personalities and harsh accusations - but the power structure of the group could change with Saturday's election. In recent months, the council has argued about state legislation that would impose a cap on rising property assessments in the planned community, whether the group was violating open-meetings laws and if a council member's behavior was threatening to Columbia Association staff.
NEWS
By George D. Solter | November 29, 2002
The recent 5-4 decision of the U.S. Supreme Court in Republican Party of Minnesota vs. White makes more urgent the need to remove Maryland's Circuit Court judges from contested elections. In this case, the court declared unconstitutional, as a violation of the First Amendment, a Minnesota rule of judicial conduct prohibiting judicial candidates from announcing their views on disputed or political issues during a campaign for election to the bench. Maryland has a similar rule that, under the Supreme Court's decision, is also unconstitutional and therefore void.
NEWS
September 9, 2002
THE CONTESTS for statewide offices in the Sept. 10 primary hadn't produced much in the way of fireworks before the comptroller's race started to crackle last week. And even then, the excitement was over a niggling political squabble - not substantive issues. Following are The Sun's primary picks for governor, attorney general and comptroller. Governor: Democratic Lt. Gov. Kathleen Kennedy Townsend and Republican Congressman Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. have had their respective parties' nominations sewn up since the day they entered the race - and there's little question that either is the best choice for the fall contest.
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