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By Tim Smith | September 19, 2002
If your ears hanker for something out of the ordinary, just keep an eye on the events calendar at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, where contemporary music is the standard music. You can start tonight with the Bugallo-Williams Piano Duo. Pianist Helena Bugallo and pianist/composer Amy Williams will perform works by some of the 20th century's most notable mavericks - Morton Feldman, Conlon Nancarrow and Karlheinz Stockhausen. There will also be pieces by Gyorgy Kurtag and Mauricio Kagel, as well as Williams herself.
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NEWS
By Mike Giuliano | March 31, 2014
If there's strength in numbers, the New York Chamber Soloists are in great shape. This 13-member ensemble of strings, winds, piano and harpsichord is large by chamber music standards, so it promises to assert itself on stage for a Candlelight Concert Society program on Saturday, April 5, at 7 p.m. at Howard Community College's Smith Theatre. On the scene for over five decades, the New York Chamber Soloists have performed for Candlelight before. The group's upcoming "American Classics" program features modern American composers.
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NEWS
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,Sun Music Critic | August 12, 2007
SANTA CRUZ, Calif. // A slogan often encountered in this compact city nestled along the north side of Monterey Bay, where the midsummer temperature hovers around 70 and the sky can be a startling blue, makes a simple, hard-to-resist plea: "Keep Santa Cruz Weird." Sure enough, there is some weirdness here, including a much-talked-about cross-dressing man decked out in pink who, shaded by a parasol, strolls at a snail's pace along the main drag. But just "offbeat" might be a better description for this diverse and tolerant community where a huge, century-old boardwalk and amusement center along the spacious beach provides one level of entertainment, and an ambitious celebration of new music held in a modest 1939 auditorium provides another.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | January 27, 2014
Scrolling through the classical winners of the 2014 Grammys, I was struck by the tilt toward the contemporary, or at least off-the-well-worn-path repertoire. I have no penetrating insight into this. I don't even know if it's a trend in recent years, since I rarely remember who wins and I'm too lazy to go back and look at the archives. But this year's list of winners seems pretty cool. The most old-time, mainstream music to get the nod was in the Best Orchestral Performance category, won by the Minnesota Orchestra for its highly valued recordings on BIS Records of the First Symphony and the much less frequently encountered Fourth Symphony by Sibelius with conductor Osmo Vanska.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | March 2, 2003
Randolph S. Rothschild, a patron of contemporary American music and a retired attorney, died Thursday of complications from Parkinson's disease and pneumonia at Sinai Hospital. The Pikesville resident was 93. A champion of modern composers for the past five decades, Mr. Rothschild was also a major benefactor of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, the Peabody Conservatory and the old Chamber Music Society of Baltimore. Until her death in 2001, he was married to Baltimore artist Amalie Rosenfeld Rothschild for 65 years.
FEATURES
January 29, 2002
AM stations WCAO 600 Gospel music. WCBM 680 News, talk, information, business, sports. WBMD 750 Religious programming. WYRE 810 Classic country. WBGR 860 Gospel music. WAMD 970 Oldies rock, adult contemporary. WOLB 1010 Talk, information, news. WBAL 1090 News, talk, personalities, Orioles games and University of Maryland sports events. WBIS 1190 Financial news. WITH 1230 Religious programming. WJFK 1300 Personality talk, weekend sports. WJSS 1330 Gospel, religious programming.
NEWS
By Mike Giuliano | March 7, 2013
A lot of contemporary classical music is being composed, but there are relatively few opportunities to hear it live. The Dancing Heart Flute and Piano Duo will be doing its part to provide modern music for modern ears with a concert for the Sundays at Three series on March 10 at Christ Episcopal Church in Columbia. Comprising Karen Johnson on flute and Carlos-Cesar Rodriguez on piano, this duo is calling its program "American Spirit. " The 20th- and 21st-century composers on the bill are Lukas Foss, Joseph Schwantner, Robert Muczynski, Jeffrey Mumford, Manuel Ponce, Alberto Ginastera and Astor Piazzolla.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 29, 2001
When board members of the Columbia Orchestra hired Jason Love to conduct the ensemble two years ago, they knew they were getting one of the area's strongest proponents of contemporary music. Love's extensive experience with the avant-garde paid off handsomely Saturday evening when the orchestra presented American composer John Corigliano's "Pied Piper Fantasy" as the centerpiece of its spring concert at Howard Community College's Smith Theatre. Composed for James Galway, the Irish flutist and box office superstar, the "Pied Piper" is a flute concerto crammed full of dissonant, highly pictorial musical effects.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | July 12, 2013
Baltimore Symphony Music Director Marin Alsop has canceled more conducting engagements as a result of injuring her July 1 falling in her hotel room in Brazil.  She canceled her gigs for the rest of the month. In order to recuperate fully, Alsop has now also canceled her annual appearance next month as music director and conductor of the Cabrillo Festival of Contemporary Music in Santa Cruz, Ca. That engagement would have required conducting a lot of demanding new repertoire. Carolyn Kuan, music director for the Hartford Symphony Orchestra and former associate conductor of the Cabrillo Festival, and Brad Lubman, former assistant conductor at Tanglewood Music Center, will fill in for Alsop at the festival, which runs Aug. 2 to 11. The festival released this statement from Alsop: "While I am deeply disappointed that I can't conduct this year's Festival, the adventurous program that we've put together will delight and surprise in the way only Cabrillo can. And I have the greatest confidence in Carolyn and Brad to bring this new music to life.
NEWS
By Heather Reese and Heather Reese,Contributing Writer | April 21, 1995
A play that deals with the sexual and physical abuse of women will be performed at Western Maryland College's Theatre on the Hill over the next two weekends."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | October 24, 2013
With a name as, um, loaded as Loadbang , you just know you're in for something different from the musicians who perform under that moniker. The make-up of the New York-based ensemble is unusual enough -- voice, bass clarinet, trumpet and trombone. The group has inspired an unusual repertoire to match. I only heard the first half of Loadbang's concert for valuable Evolution Contemporary Music Series at An die Musik , but that contained a full dose of intriguing, not to mention challenging, scores.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | July 12, 2013
Baltimore Symphony Music Director Marin Alsop has canceled more conducting engagements as a result of injuring her July 1 falling in her hotel room in Brazil.  She canceled her gigs for the rest of the month. In order to recuperate fully, Alsop has now also canceled her annual appearance next month as music director and conductor of the Cabrillo Festival of Contemporary Music in Santa Cruz, Ca. That engagement would have required conducting a lot of demanding new repertoire. Carolyn Kuan, music director for the Hartford Symphony Orchestra and former associate conductor of the Cabrillo Festival, and Brad Lubman, former assistant conductor at Tanglewood Music Center, will fill in for Alsop at the festival, which runs Aug. 2 to 11. The festival released this statement from Alsop: "While I am deeply disappointed that I can't conduct this year's Festival, the adventurous program that we've put together will delight and surprise in the way only Cabrillo can. And I have the greatest confidence in Carolyn and Brad to bring this new music to life.
NEWS
By Mike Giuliano | March 7, 2013
A lot of contemporary classical music is being composed, but there are relatively few opportunities to hear it live. The Dancing Heart Flute and Piano Duo will be doing its part to provide modern music for modern ears with a concert for the Sundays at Three series on March 10 at Christ Episcopal Church in Columbia. Comprising Karen Johnson on flute and Carlos-Cesar Rodriguez on piano, this duo is calling its program "American Spirit. " The 20th- and 21st-century composers on the bill are Lukas Foss, Joseph Schwantner, Robert Muczynski, Jeffrey Mumford, Manuel Ponce, Alberto Ginastera and Astor Piazzolla.
EXPLORE
By Mike Giuliano | February 16, 2012
The Gryphon Trio will be thinking a lot about Beethoven when this Canadian ensemble performs locally for the Candlelight Concert Society Saturday, Feb. 18 at 8 p.m. at Howard Community College's Smith Theatre. "We love Beethoven," cellist Roman Borys says from his Toronto home. "When we're asked who our favorite composer is, it's usually Beethoven that is our answer. " And so Borys, violinist Annalee Patipatanakoon and pianist Jamie Parker are eager to launch into an all-Beethoven program comprised of the Trio in C minor, Op. 1, No. 3; Trio in B-flat Major, WoO 39; Variations in E-flat Major, Op. 44; and Trio in B-flat Major, Op. 97 "Archduke.
NEWS
By Sam Sessa and Sam Sessa,Sam.sessa@baltsun.com | July 12, 2009
Brian Sacawa and Erik Spangler see themselves as sound guerrillas. The co-founders of the Contemporary Museum's off-kilter Mobtown Modern concert series don't just perform experimental music - sometimes they like to sneak up on people with it. That's the case with Mobtown Modern's latest project, a rendition of Mauricio Kagel's Eine Brise (A Breeze), subtitled "Fleeting Action for 111 Cyclists." No, that number's not a typo. The piece features a troupe of 111 bicyclists, who whistle, ring bells and make whooshing noises with their breath while riding to re-create the sound of a breeze.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | February 11, 2008
NEW YORK --When Marin Alsop stepped onto the podium of the Carnegie Hall stage to lead the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra on Saturday night, a considerable crescendo of applause rose from a sizable audience that included feminist Gloria Steinem, stellar soprano Jessye Norman and Trey Anastasio, formerly of the rock group Phish. ... That feeling of good will in the house never abated. There was a sense of occasion about the event, which drew a larger turnout from the musical press than has typically greeted the BSO here in recent years.
FEATURES
By Jimmie Mass and Jimmie Mass,Fort Worth Star-Telegram | October 31, 1991
This is the way we change, we change.In 1988, M.C. Hammer climbed the charts by telling the world "Let's Get It Started."Two years later, the world got hit hard with "Please Hammer Don't Hurt 'Em."The man who premiered his own Saturday morning cartoon series this fall -- as the super hero Hammerman -- is not about to stop kickin' it.OK, OK, stop the music. Stooop!!! I can't be perpetratin' to my public.Sorry to break the news, but Hammer's latest album, "Too Legit To Quit" is a little weak.
FEATURES
By Scott Duncan and Scott Duncan,Evening Sun Staff | September 24, 1990
IT'S GOOD TO HEAR Michael Torke's music spread out over several concerts, as we are this month as David Zinman and the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra highlight the young composer in the orchestra's first American Composer Showcase.This is not so much because you can chart Torke's stylistic growth; his 1985 "Bright Blue Music," heard Friday on the BSO's Favorites Series, does not seem very distant from "Ash," a piece written only last year and heard at Meyerhoff Hall last week.It's more the ability to encounter a Torke work, with all its bubbly optimism (so alien to post-war contemporary music)
NEWS
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,Sun Music Critic | August 12, 2007
SANTA CRUZ, Calif. // A slogan often encountered in this compact city nestled along the north side of Monterey Bay, where the midsummer temperature hovers around 70 and the sky can be a startling blue, makes a simple, hard-to-resist plea: "Keep Santa Cruz Weird." Sure enough, there is some weirdness here, including a much-talked-about cross-dressing man decked out in pink who, shaded by a parasol, strolls at a snail's pace along the main drag. But just "offbeat" might be a better description for this diverse and tolerant community where a huge, century-old boardwalk and amusement center along the spacious beach provides one level of entertainment, and an ambitious celebration of new music held in a modest 1939 auditorium provides another.
ENTERTAINMENT
By MARC SHAPIRO and MARC SHAPIRO,SUN REPORTER | August 24, 2006
A call out for unity/in every province and city/what do you think we've been saying/since we first started playing." These words end 311's "Electricity," from the 1997 album, Transistor. This summer's Unity Tour - which comes to the Nissan Pavilion tomorrow - is turning these words into actions. Sharing the stage with 311 for the whole run are the Wailers, the legendary reggae band that backed Bob Marley for his entire career, and Hawaiian band Pepper, which plays a hybrid of reggae, rock, punk and pop. The tour is a celebration of the unity in contemporary music - these bands might not have shared the stage in a segregated live music scene decades ago. At each performance, Jamaican, Hawaiian and American music come together.
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