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By Lisa Respers and Lisa Respers,SUN STAFF | May 14, 1996
Fourth-graders at Relay Elementary School got a chance to do something yesterday that some of them do only when no one is looking -- dance."I'm usually not into it," said Jake Slusher, 10, as he took a break from some hip-hop action. "I like music, and I like to watch other people do it, but I usually don't dance."Jake and other students were treated to a workshop given by members of the Phoenix Repertory Dance Company, a professional modern dance troupe in residence at University of Maryland Baltimore County.
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ENTERTAINMENT
Amy Watts and For The Baltimore Sun | May 17, 2013
Note: Since I recap both Dancing with the Stars and So You Think You Can Dance and they're overlapping seasons this week and next, I'll be covering both nights in one recap for these first two weeks. They open with past winners and notable contestants being interviewed about how their life changed by putting on a number and getting in the audition line. My favorite bit is Mary with a giant, tight, curly hairdo, like when we had perms in the '80s. Tuesday Night - Los Angeles Auditions We're in Los Angeles at the Orpheum Theatre.
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FEATURES
By J.L. Conklin | September 8, 1991
Those willing to drive, or take the train, to nearby cities can avail themselves of great dance this fall. Here are some of the best offerings:WASHINGTON*Once again the Kennedy Center has a great lineup of ballet companies scheduled for the '91-'92 season. Ballet West is at the Opera House Oct. 8-13, followed by the Kirov Ballet Oct. 15-17. Pacific Northwest Ballet takes up residence Jan. 28 to Feb. 2, with Dance Theater of Harlem in March 13-29. The Royal Danish Ballet closes the series with performances June 16-21.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | April 5, 2013
If there is a single work that captures the essence of America in sound and movement, it's "Appalachian Spring," the ballet with music by Aaron Copland and choreography by Martha Graham that premiered in 1944 at the Library of Congress. Although the sonic part of the piece is never out of earshot, thanks to the perennially performed orchestral suite Copland fashioned from the score, the opportunity to experience the music and dance in its original form doesn't come around every day. Since last fall, students at the Baltimore School for the Arts have been delving into the ballet from every angle, preparing for "An Appalachian Spring Festival," an interdisciplinary project that includes an art exhibit, a concert and panel discussions.
FEATURES
By J. .L Conklin and J. .L Conklin,Special to The Sun | September 11, 1994
For the past several years, the dance season has been jump-started by the Dance on the Edge Series and its high-voltage performances from national and international contemporary dance groups. This year, however, DOE is almost DOA.Why is it foundering? The obvious answer is funding problems. The less obvious answer is the lack of autonomy. Relocating the event from its original venue at the Baltimore Museum of Art to the Towson State University campus was supposed to help the organization.
FEATURES
By Charlotte Sommers and Charlotte Sommers,Special to The Sun | January 29, 1995
When a ballerina points her toe, no one asks why. Yet, let a modern dancer curl into a contraction and everyone strains to get the meaning.What is it about contemporary dance that connects the choreographer with the audience in a way that classical dance doesn't? Is movement for the sake of movement valid?These are just a few of the mysteries of modern dance that were explored during the Maryland Dance Showcase Workshop for Choreographers, sponsored by the Mayor's Advisory Committee on Art and Culture and held recently at the University of Maryland Baltimore County.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,Special to the Sun | June 12, 2008
During the Columbia Festival of the Arts this month, bodies in motion will honor Latin American traditions through contemporary dance, portray the human experience with jazz accompaniment and employ acrobatics and contraptions in an attempt to defy the laws of physics. The inspirations are different for the three dance companies included in this year's festival lineup, but the founders of Luna Negra Dance Theater, Garth Fagan Dance and STREB share a goal to give audiences something new, insightful and beautiful.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | December 25, 2012
Carol Bartlett, a choreographer who had been the Peabody Preparatory dance department's artistic director for 25 years, died of cancer Dec. 15 at her Rodgers Forge home. She was 67. "She was the backbone and inspirational leader of the Peabody Preparatory's dance department," said Carolee Stewart, the preparatory school's dean. "She was a beloved teacher. She also planned and was chief choreographer for its productions. " Born Carol Trotman in Colchester, Essex, England, she was trained in the tradition of the Royal Academy of Ballet as a child.
FEATURES
May 27, 2000
Billy Graham closing book on big crusades After preaching to more than 210 million people in nearly 200 countries over the past 50 years, Billy Graham is nearing the end of his crusades. The 81-year-old Southern Baptist preacher, who has Parkinson's disease, said his crusade in Nashville next week will be one of his last although he'll continue preaching to smaller groups. "I felt in my heart that this would be the last year of my crusades, and Nashville is one of the cities God laid on my heart to visit," Graham said.
NEWS
By SANDY ALEXANDER and SANDY ALEXANDER,SUN REPORTER | June 16, 2006
Jillian Harris' dance career has taken her across the country and to international events, but tonight it will bring her home to Columbia, where she first learned to love movement and music. As a principal dancer with the Kun-Yang Lin/Dancers, Harris will perform contemporary dance pieces as part of a seven-member company at the Jim Rouse Theater. The performance is part of the Columbia Festival of the Arts, which continues through June 24 with music, theater, comedy and dance performances at several Columbia venues.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | December 25, 2012
Carol Bartlett, a choreographer who had been the Peabody Preparatory dance department's artistic director for 25 years, died of cancer Dec. 15 at her Rodgers Forge home. She was 67. "She was the backbone and inspirational leader of the Peabody Preparatory's dance department," said Carolee Stewart, the preparatory school's dean. "She was a beloved teacher. She also planned and was chief choreographer for its productions. " Born Carol Trotman in Colchester, Essex, England, she was trained in the tradition of the Royal Academy of Ballet as a child.
EXPLORE
By Carolyn Kelemen | June 27, 2011
For Columbia's Alex Ketley , the dance road leading to this week's national TV exposure on "So You Think You Can Dance" began under the tutelage of the late Anne Allen as a member of her Columbia Multi-Media Dance Theater Company. That training opened doors for this Wilde Lake High School graduate, and earned him credits with the Washington Ballet. The road led eventually to California as a classical dancer with the San Francisco Ballet, where Ketley performed from 1994 to 1998 in a wide-ranging ballet repertory that included the works of master choreographerGeorge Balanchine.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,Special to the Sun | June 12, 2008
During the Columbia Festival of the Arts this month, bodies in motion will honor Latin American traditions through contemporary dance, portray the human experience with jazz accompaniment and employ acrobatics and contraptions in an attempt to defy the laws of physics. The inspirations are different for the three dance companies included in this year's festival lineup, but the founders of Luna Negra Dance Theater, Garth Fagan Dance and STREB share a goal to give audiences something new, insightful and beautiful.
NEWS
By MARY JOHNSON and MARY JOHNSON,Special to The Sun | June 8, 2007
Over the years I've attended my share of boring dance recitals at lesser venues, but Saturday's three-hour performance by the Ballet Theatre of Maryland's School of Classical and Contemporary Dance was so good that it more than made up for all those unpleasant experiences. Describing the year-end recital as "the chance to show how much the students have learned," said Dianna Cuatto, the theatre's artistic and school director. "This is the one time all of the students, older and younger, get together in one building and interact."
NEWS
By Laura McCandlish and Laura McCandlish,Sun Reporter | April 22, 2007
My dance career began inauspiciously, nearly ending in third grade when I missed the cut for The Nutcracker. Prancing around for the role of a mouse, my mind wandered out of the audition studio that day. Those little-girl ballerina dreams escaped me. Had I ever even asked to take ballet? No, my Francophile mother must have forced the rigid dance, not to mention the French language, on me. Nor did I enjoy my second brief encounter with ballet some three years later. To improve my ice-skating moves, a friend suggested I join her class.
NEWS
By SANDY ALEXANDER and SANDY ALEXANDER,SUN REPORTER | June 16, 2006
Jillian Harris' dance career has taken her across the country and to international events, but tonight it will bring her home to Columbia, where she first learned to love movement and music. As a principal dancer with the Kun-Yang Lin/Dancers, Harris will perform contemporary dance pieces as part of a seven-member company at the Jim Rouse Theater. The performance is part of the Columbia Festival of the Arts, which continues through June 24 with music, theater, comedy and dance performances at several Columbia venues.
FEATURES
By J. L. Conklin and J. L. Conklin,Contributing Writer | September 5, 1993
While a proposal looms in the wings for a new College Park arts center that would offer real performance space for dance, in the immediate future dance aficionados can look forward to an exciting season. From the ridiculous to the sublime, from the avant-garde to the classical, from performances in Baltimore to shows in Washington, this is a season of choice., Avant-garde performances For those who prefer to make their home on the cutting edge of artistic sensibilities, the obvious choice is the Dance on the Edge series.
EXPLORE
By Carolyn Kelemen | June 27, 2011
For Columbia's Alex Ketley , the dance road leading to this week's national TV exposure on "So You Think You Can Dance" began under the tutelage of the late Anne Allen as a member of her Columbia Multi-Media Dance Theater Company. That training opened doors for this Wilde Lake High School graduate, and earned him credits with the Washington Ballet. The road led eventually to California as a classical dancer with the San Francisco Ballet, where Ketley performed from 1994 to 1998 in a wide-ranging ballet repertory that included the works of master choreographerGeorge Balanchine.
FEATURES
May 27, 2000
Billy Graham closing book on big crusades After preaching to more than 210 million people in nearly 200 countries over the past 50 years, Billy Graham is nearing the end of his crusades. The 81-year-old Southern Baptist preacher, who has Parkinson's disease, said his crusade in Nashville next week will be one of his last although he'll continue preaching to smaller groups. "I felt in my heart that this would be the last year of my crusades, and Nashville is one of the cities God laid on my heart to visit," Graham said.
NEWS
By Lisa Respers and Lisa Respers,SUN STAFF | May 14, 1996
Fourth-graders at Relay Elementary School got a chance to do something yesterday that some of them do only when no one is looking -- dance."I'm usually not into it," said Jake Slusher, 10, as he took a break from some hip-hop action. "I like music, and I like to watch other people do it, but I usually don't dance."Jake and other students were treated to a workshop given by members of the Phoenix Repertory Dance Company, a professional modern dance troupe in residence at University of Maryland Baltimore County.
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