Advertisement
HomeCollectionsContemporary Artists
IN THE NEWS

Contemporary Artists

FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By GLENN MCNATT and GLENN MCNATT,SUN ART CRITIC | March 29, 2006
Contemporary art by African-Americans, like that of other contemporary artists, is all over the place at the moment, both geographically and stylistically. Important recent shows have included Sam Gilliam in Washington, Kara Walker and Roy DeCarava in New York, and the quilters of Gee's Bend, Ala., at Atlanta's High Museum of Art. Riffs and Rhythms: Abstract Forms / Lived Realities, on view at the James E. Lewis Museum of Art on the campus of Morgan State University, surveys a group of six regional contemporary artists who have worked in nonrepresentational styles for many years and whose efforts likewise deserve wider recognition.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Cassandra A. Fortin and Cassandra A. Fortin,special to the sun | January 11, 2007
To Noi Volkov, a simple faucet, a model of a Ford Thunderbird and photos of Marilyn Monroe and Woody Allen are more than just odds and ends. To him, they are the makings for a ceramic teapot. "I am trying to create a new, unorthodox style of ceramics," said the 60-year-old Owings Mills man. "It's a mixture of Renaissance and pop art. It has a little bit of Dali and some Picasso." The teapot uses the back of the T-bird model as a handle, the faucet as the spout, and images of Monroe and Allen on either side of the body.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | April 4, 2004
Art of the Japanese Postcard: Masterpieces from the Leonard A. Lauder Collection. MFA Publications. 288 pages with 370 illustrations, 350 in color. $45. This is the enchanting catalog of an exhibition of the enormous Lauder collection, presented by Boston's Museum of Fine Arts, which will be on display through June 10. The cards were made between 1880 and 1940, from work by graphic designers and contemporary artists -- a rich popular commercial art...
FEATURES
By GLENN MCNATT and GLENN MCNATT,SUN ART CRITIC | March 29, 2006
Contemporary art by African-Americans, like that of other contemporary artists, is all over the place at the moment, both geographically and stylistically. Important recent shows have included Sam Gilliam in Washington, Kara Walker and Roy DeCarava in New York, and the quilters of Gee's Bend, Ala., at Atlanta's High Museum of Art. Riffs and Rhythms: Abstract Forms / Lived Realities, on view at the James E. Lewis Museum of Art on the campus of Morgan State University, surveys a group of six regional contemporary artists who have worked in nonrepresentational styles for many years and whose efforts likewise deserve wider recognition.
NEWS
By Daniel Grant and Daniel Grant,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 29, 1996
Last year, a small auction house in California, which was offering some sculptures by the late artist Robert Arneson, contacted Arneson's New York art dealer to inquire whether he would be interested in putting in a bid. "The works," said George Adams, director of New York City's Frumkin/Adams Gallery, "looked vaguely like Arneson's, but I was far from convinced."Adams sent photographs of the sculptures to Arneson's widow, who identified them as having been done by the artist's sons when they were 10 and 12. The dealer then notified the auction house of the correct attribution of those works.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | September 26, 1995
"Going for Baroque" is a fascinating idea provocatively realized. It's erratic, some of its art is less than immortal, and at times it verges on being about labels rather than art. But at its best the show is revelatory, and it never fails to hold the viewer's interest.A collaboration of The Contemporary (which is all about art of today) and the Walters Art Gallery (which is all about art of the past), "Going for Baroque" places the work of 18 contemporary artists in the context of 17th and 18th century Baroque and rococo works in the Walters' collection.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | December 21, 2004
To hear some tell it, identity art - the set of art practices that became popular in the 1990s as a way of examining issues of race, class and gender - is old hat by now. Been there, done that. Yet to judge from (In)visible Silence, the thoughtful exhibition curated by New York-based artist Sanford Biggers at Baltimore's School 33 Art Center, contemporary artists are still creating new works that challenge stereotypes, skewer the powers-that-be and demand answers to the big questions about who we are as a nation and as individuals.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Art Critic | January 16, 1994
They're under-priced. They're under-exposed, both here and in their homeland. But some of the world's leading museums are buying them. And now, at last, they've come to Baltimore."
FEATURES
By Mike Giuliano and Mike Giuliano,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 11, 2003
To understand the big picture in Imperfect Innocence: The Dennis and Debra Scholl Collection, 1992-2002, the photography exhibit opening today at Baltimore's Contemporary Museum, first look at the two small, paired, black-and-white photographs taken by renowned German photographers Bernd and Hilla Becher. Part of the Bechers' career-long devotion to documenting often derelict industrial buildings in Europe and the United States, Pithead No. 6 and 32 (1966) provides a straightforward depiction of a Welsh coal mine's buildings and equipment.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | May 16, 2001
It may not be Christie's or Sotheby's. But the works are by internationally recognized artists; they're for sale, and, compared to the astronomical figures racked up in New York, the prices are quite reasonable - for art, at least. Welcome to "The Big Picture: Take 2," the second annual fund-raising exhibit and auction sponsored by Baltimore's Contemporary Museum. The museum, at 100 W. Centre St., has been accepting bids since April on 111 artworks, and the event will culminate in a reception and live auction that begins at 5 p.m. Saturday.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | December 21, 2004
To hear some tell it, identity art - the set of art practices that became popular in the 1990s as a way of examining issues of race, class and gender - is old hat by now. Been there, done that. Yet to judge from (In)visible Silence, the thoughtful exhibition curated by New York-based artist Sanford Biggers at Baltimore's School 33 Art Center, contemporary artists are still creating new works that challenge stereotypes, skewer the powers-that-be and demand answers to the big questions about who we are as a nation and as individuals.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | April 4, 2004
Art of the Japanese Postcard: Masterpieces from the Leonard A. Lauder Collection. MFA Publications. 288 pages with 370 illustrations, 350 in color. $45. This is the enchanting catalog of an exhibition of the enormous Lauder collection, presented by Boston's Museum of Fine Arts, which will be on display through June 10. The cards were made between 1880 and 1940, from work by graphic designers and contemporary artists -- a rich popular commercial art...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun Art Critic | November 23, 2003
Over the last 20 years, artworks that explore issues of racial and gender identity have emerged as a significant genre in contemporary art, as women, gays and people of color all have sought to redefine their relationship to America's democratic ideal. Curiously, however, one group remains largely invisible in the art that takes ethnic and racial identity as its subject: white people. Why this should be so is something of a paradox: While people of color traditionally have been defined in terms of their not being white, the definition of whiteness itself has no meaning outside its relationship to nonwhiteness.
FEATURES
By Mike Giuliano and Mike Giuliano,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 11, 2003
To understand the big picture in Imperfect Innocence: The Dennis and Debra Scholl Collection, 1992-2002, the photography exhibit opening today at Baltimore's Contemporary Museum, first look at the two small, paired, black-and-white photographs taken by renowned German photographers Bernd and Hilla Becher. Part of the Bechers' career-long devotion to documenting often derelict industrial buildings in Europe and the United States, Pithead No. 6 and 32 (1966) provides a straightforward depiction of a Welsh coal mine's buildings and equipment.
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,SUN STAFF | May 30, 2001
On the cover of his latest jazz record, "From the Heart," Kim Waters is a portrait in cool: contemporary black T-shirt, natty mustache, vapor trail of a smile. He looks as though he could mow his yard in silk pajamas and not splash grass on himself. Waters is the Phil Jackson of contemporary jazz. When Waters was left stranded in a Florida hotel this year and missed most of a gig, he stayed cool. When Waters dropped his signature white-coated saxophone in Norfolk - the equivalent of Shaq fouling out of a Lakers game - Waters kept his cool.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | May 16, 2001
It may not be Christie's or Sotheby's. But the works are by internationally recognized artists; they're for sale, and, compared to the astronomical figures racked up in New York, the prices are quite reasonable - for art, at least. Welcome to "The Big Picture: Take 2," the second annual fund-raising exhibit and auction sponsored by Baltimore's Contemporary Museum. The museum, at 100 W. Centre St., has been accepting bids since April on 111 artworks, and the event will culminate in a reception and live auction that begins at 5 p.m. Saturday.
NEWS
By Cassandra A. Fortin and Cassandra A. Fortin,special to the sun | January 11, 2007
To Noi Volkov, a simple faucet, a model of a Ford Thunderbird and photos of Marilyn Monroe and Woody Allen are more than just odds and ends. To him, they are the makings for a ceramic teapot. "I am trying to create a new, unorthodox style of ceramics," said the 60-year-old Owings Mills man. "It's a mixture of Renaissance and pop art. It has a little bit of Dali and some Picasso." The teapot uses the back of the T-bird model as a handle, the faucet as the spout, and images of Monroe and Allen on either side of the body.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt | September 7, 1997
SOME revolutions announce themselves loudly, with trumpets blaring and cannons booming. Others unfold right under our noses, but no one seems to notice the world is being turned upside down. Such has been the transformation of art in our time.I was reminded of this by the art of Chevelle Makeba Moore, whose work is the subject of an article by John Dorsey elsewhere on this page. Among Moore's paintings is one created for Absolut vodka as part of a series of ads the company commissioned from prominent artists.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | August 24, 1999
In 1976, when the Baltimore Museum of Art was trying to purchase a new work by the Minimalist artist Donald Judd, it was New York art dealer Leo Castelli who made the impossible happen. As former BMA deputy director Brenda Richardson recalled it, the museum had recently exhibited Judd's Minimalist plywood boxes and felt strongly it should have one in its own collection. But there was a problem: Castelli, who was regarded as the most influentual dealer of his age and whose gallery was a showcase for a virtual Who's Who of talent that made New York the center of contemporary art, was selling Judd's boxes for $60,000 apiece.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt | September 7, 1997
SOME revolutions announce themselves loudly, with trumpets blaring and cannons booming. Others unfold right under our noses, but no one seems to notice the world is being turned upside down. Such has been the transformation of art in our time.I was reminded of this by the art of Chevelle Makeba Moore, whose work is the subject of an article by John Dorsey elsewhere on this page. Among Moore's paintings is one created for Absolut vodka as part of a series of ads the company commissioned from prominent artists.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.