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Contamination

NEWS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | August 16, 2010
Sen. Benjamin L. Cardin is calling for a rapid investigation and expanded cleanup at Fort Detrick in Frederick amid fresh questions over the testing and storage of the notorious herbicide blend Agent Orange there decades ago. Cardin wants the Army and the Environmental Protection Agency to reach an agreement by December that would allow more federal money and expertise to come to the base, where dangerous chemicals were maintained for years and...
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FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | July 22, 2010
This is what progress looks like in cleaning up one of the most polluted industrial sites in the Chesapeake Bay region: A lone pump labors in a rubble-strewn field at Sparrows Point, making soft gasping noises as it siphons a thin stream of oily waste from underground. The pump is one of the first put in by steelmaker Severstal North America to tap the huge plume of contamination underlying the 2,300-acre peninsula in Baltimore's harbor, where the dirty business of making steel has been practiced for more than a century.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | July 9, 2010
A pair of environmental groups and several Dundalk-area residents filed suit Friday against present and former owners of the Sparrows Point steel mill, accusing them of polluting nearby waterways that feed into the Chesapeake Bay and threatening the health of people in neighboring communities. The lawsuit was filed in U.S. District Court in Baltimore by the Chesapeake Bay Foundation, the Baltimore Harbor Waterkeeper and seven people who live near Sparrows Point. They are seeking injunctions to halt what they claim is continuing pollution and require cleanup of all contamination on and from the 2,300-acre peninsula.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | June 25, 2010
The owner of the steel plant at Sparrows Point has moved to create an industrial-waste landfill on the contaminated Baltimore County peninsula, even as the company takes long-awaited first steps to clean up toxic waste seeping into the outer harbor and tributaries of the Chesapeake Bay. Severstal North America applied last week to the Maryland Department of the Environment to develop a 60-acre landfill adjacent to one of two old waste-disposal mounds...
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | May 21, 2010
For much of the 20th century, the steelmakers of Sparrows Point dumped their waste into crude landfills along the Patapsco River. Large iron containers, heavy piping and other metal was left to rust, relics that continue to blot the landscape some 40 years after environmental regulators shut the landfills down. Now a market that has pushed the price of scrap iron to $450 a ton has created an incentive for steel manufacturers to retrieve some of that refuse. But their efforts are meeting resistance from neighbors and environmental activists who worry about the consequences of disturbing trapped contamination.
NEWS
By Brent Jones | brent.jones@baltsun.com | April 10, 2010
A Carroll County jury is expected to continue hearing evidence next week in a class action lawsuit accusing a local oil company of polluting water wells with an additive linked to cancer in lab animals. At least a half-dozen Finksburg residents are suing Tevis Oil Inc. after methyl tertiary butyl ether, or MTBE, detected in gasoline at a company-owned Shell station at Suffolk Road and Route 140 was found to have affected 23 neighboring wells in 2002. Witnesses for the plaintiffs were called this week in the case, which accuses Tevis of negligence, trespass and nuisance.
NEWS
By Brent Jones | brent.jones@baltsun.com | April 9, 2010
A Carroll County jury is expected to continue hearing evidence next week in a class action lawsuit accusing a local oil company of polluting water wells with an additive linked to cancer in lab animals. At least a half dozen Finksburg residents are suing Tevis Oil Inc. after methyl tertiary butyl ether, or MTBE, detected in gasoline at a company-owned Shell station at Suffolk Road and Route 140 was found to have affected 23 neighboring wells in 2002. Witnesses for the plaintiffs were called this week in the case, which accuses Tevis of negligence, trespass and nuisance.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler | April 3, 2010
The Maryland Department of the Environment filed suit Friday against an Atlanta-based power company, alleging that its coal-ash landfill in Prince George's County is polluting groundwater and a nearby creek. The Brandywine landfill operated by Mirant Mid-Atlantic is allowing coal-ash contaminants to seep into the ground and get into Mattaponi Creek, the state agency contends. The lawsuit, filed in U.S. District Court in Baltimore, comes 60 days after state environmental officials notified Mirant that it would be sued if it did not agree to clean up pollution from the 300-acre landfill.
NEWS
By Nick Madigan | nick.madigan@baltsun.com | March 13, 2010
ExxonMobil must resume testing 130 residential wells in the Jacksonville area that were affected by a huge underground gasoline leak in 2006, according to a directive from the Maryland Department of the Environment. The oil giant also has been told to resume deliveries of free bottled water to 126 households in the northern Baltimore County neighborhood. Both changes are contingent on a final MDE decision, expected by May 1. The MDE order, conveyed to ExxonMobil in a letter dated Wednesday, follows a public rebuke of the agency by Gov. Martin O'Malley on March 3. He objected to the agency granting a request from the oil company that it be permitted to stop testing the private wells and providing bottled water to area residents.
HEALTH
By Liz F. Kay | liz.kay@baltsun.com | March 6, 2010
McCormick & Co. announced a recall of four processed foods Friday afternoon because of possible salmonella contamination of an ingredient. The Sparks-based company recalled packages of French onion dip mix, vegetable dip mix, onion gravy mix and corn bread stuffing mix, all of which contained hydrolyzed vegetable protein manufactured by Basic Food Flavors of Las Vegas. Another manufacturer, a Basic Food Flavors customer, detected the contamination and reported it to the FDA. That company is recalling all the hydrolyzed vegetable protein produced since Sept.
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