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Contamination

NEWS
By Jonathan Peterson and Denise Gellene and Jonathan Peterson and Denise Gellene,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 18, 2004
WASHINGTON - A Food and Drug Administration report made public yesterday shows that bacterial contamination at Chiron Corp.'s flu vaccine plant in England is more widespread than previously thought, raising doubts about the company's ability to deliver flu shots in 2005. Also yesterday, the FDA disclosed during a congressional hearing into the vaccine shortage that the results of an inspection of the plant in June 2003, which found evidence of contamination and faulty sterilization procedures, were not shared with the company until a year later, when it would have been too late to make changes to salvage this year's batch of 50 million shots.
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NEWS
By MARY GAIL HARE and MARY GAIL HARE,SUN REPORTER | June 16, 2006
7-Eleven Inc. is responsible for the leak of a gasoline additive that threatened Aberdeen's water supply, according to the Maryland Department of the Environment. The source of methyl tertiary butyl ether, or MTBE, discovered in Aberdeen's wells two years ago was the 7-Eleven store on South Philadelphia Road, just across the highway from the city's well field, state officials said. The state's investigation found a crushed vent line in the gas station's underground tanks. Tanks are vented to allow fumes to escape into the air, where they dissipate.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,Staff writer | February 17, 1991
State environmental officials are negotiating with North Carroll Shopping Center and the former owners of a dry cleaner there to recoup the cost of cleaning contaminated ground water behind the building, said the Maryland Department of the Environment.Current C & C Dry Cleaners owner Charley Pak is not responsible and didn't own the business when the contamination was found in 1987, said department spokesman John Goheen. Pak bought the business in 1989.The MDE will continue testing residential wells as a precaution and hopes to start a cleanup by the end of the year, Goheen said.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,SUN STAFF | March 27, 2000
Two wells that were once among the best producers in Hampstead's public water system remain in a kind of quarantine -- sealed off from the rest of the supply because of the threat of contamination by solvents from the nearby Black & Decker Corp. plant. Town officials believe that their wells could be safe from the contaminants. But this month the company turned down the town's request for help in proving the water's safety. A Black & Decker official said the company is concerned that pumping from the wells could cause known contamination to move, thwarting a state-ordered cleanup the company is carrying out. While testing for contamination from a gasoline station in 1985, Black & Decker discovered that wells on its site were contaminated with trichloroethylene (TCE)
NEWS
By Josh Mitchell and Josh Mitchell,SUN STAFF | March 26, 2005
ExxonMobil Corp. acknowledged yesterday that it may be responsible for up to half of the chemically contaminated drinking-water wells in Fallston, but said it needs to do additional tests to determine the extent of its culpability. In a report to the Maryland Department of the Environment, the oil company said it needs to do additional tests on about 145 wells to the southwest of an Exxon station at routes 152 and 165 in the Upper Crossroads area. Most of the wells have shown a trace of methyl tertiary butyl ether, or MTBE, a gasoline additive used to make fuel burn cleaner.
BUSINESS
By Sean Somerville and Sean Somerville,SUN STAFF | June 28, 1997
With a Monday deadline looming for the sale of the Bethlehem Steel Corp.'s Sparrows Point shipyard, Peter Angelos and Bethlehem Steel yesterday failed to resolve differences over the handling of possible environmental contamination at the shipyard.Angelos and Bethlehem wouldn't comment on the talks, which included representatives of the Environmental Protection Agency and the Department of Justice."The deal is there except for the EPA issue," Angelos said.A source familiar with the negotiations who insisted on anonymity said: "The purchasers find the environmental issues are formidable and difficult to resolve and pose a potential threat to consummating the transaction."
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | May 21, 2010
For much of the 20th century, the steelmakers of Sparrows Point dumped their waste into crude landfills along the Patapsco River. Large iron containers, heavy piping and other metal was left to rust, relics that continue to blot the landscape some 40 years after environmental regulators shut the landfills down. Now a market that has pushed the price of scrap iron to $450 a ton has created an incentive for steel manufacturers to retrieve some of that refuse. But their efforts are meeting resistance from neighbors and environmental activists who worry about the consequences of disturbing trapped contamination.
NEWS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,SUN STAFF | June 25, 2004
With state officials uncertain what has caused a wave of well contamination in Harford County, some elected leaders are calling for wells to be tested in a broader area, and one said Exxon Mobil Corp. should consider temporarily closing a service station suspected to be at the root of the problem. Tests have found 68 wells near a Fallston Exxon station to be contaminated with the gasoline additive methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE). Eight of them contain levels of MTBE above what the state considers safe.
NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt and Laura Barnhardt,sun reporter | February 22, 2007
A federal judge in southern New York ruled yesterday that a lawsuit filed by Fallston residents against Exxon Mobil Corp. for future and past contamination of their wells by the gasoline additive MTBE may proceed as a class action suit. The order allows Fallston residents whose wells have been tainted by methyl tertiary-butyl ether and those whose wells have not shown levels of the additive but who may have been affected by declining property values to seek damages from Exxon Mobil and a former Exxon station that was at the intersection of routes 152 and 165. The ruling by Judge Shira A. Scheindlin consolidates the claims by the Fallston residents into one case and allows them to collectively seek damages because their claims are based on the same legal theories, the judge said.
NEWS
By Josh Mitchell and Josh Mitchell,SUN STAFF | April 10, 2005
Steve and Rita Howarth have stopped serving houseguests ice cubes in their sodas. Their neighbor Sue Hargest not only drinks bottled water, but she also washes her dishes and brushes her teeth with it. Last year, the Fallston residents learned that their well water contained traces of a gasoline additive, methyl tertiary butyl ether, or MTBE. Although the chemical isn't known to be harmful at the low levels found in their wells, they're taking no chances. "I don't feel safe to drink my water," Hargest said.
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