Advertisement
HomeCollectionsContamination
IN THE NEWS

Contamination

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
November 5, 2013
In regard to the article, "Environment agencies delay Harbor Point work" (Nov. 1), Can you say cover-up? Can you say shady? Isn't it strange that the chromium readings are high in the area of Harbor Point? Has no one or no agency been monitoring the area from the early days of the original capping till now? Maybe it has been high all along and it just was not known or made common knowledge. Good thing to check on The Sun's part. Who did the last round of testing, and more importantly, who will do the next one?
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | August 25, 2014
The only signs investigators found of the chemical-laden railroad hopper car that exploded after it derailed last year in Rosedale were twisted and deformed pieces of its aluminum shell that shot out like shrapnel, landing as far as 370 feet away. "Of the larger wreckage pieces recovered along [adjacent] Lake Drive, was a brake valve weighing about 70 pounds, a piece of aluminum rail car frame, and a fractured piece of burnt rail tie," wrote Paul L. Stancil, the National Transportation Safety Board's senior hazardous materials investigator, in a factual report on the explosion released Monday.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | October 4, 2013
A meeting to address residents' concerns over environmental hazards on the site of the proposed Harbor Point development has been delayed because of the federal government shutdown. The meeting had been scheduled for Monday at neighbors' demands, but Environmental Protection Agency officials will not be able to attend because they have been furloughed, said City Councilman James Kraft, who organized the meeting. The controversial Harbor Point development, slated to house energy company Exelon Corp.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Allison Eatough, For The Baltimore Sun and By Allison Eatough, For The Baltimore Sun | July 1, 2014
Each spring, potted herbs and vegetables dot the fire escape of Steve Kelly's home in Mount Vernon. He grows anywhere from six to nine types of peppers, ranging from red and yellow to cayenne and banana. His herbs include basil, tarragon, chives, rosemary and thyme. And then there's the mint. Kelly grows three kinds: orange mint, spearmint and peppermint. He uses them in tea, water and the occasional "adult beverage," he said. "I throw [herbs] in almost everything I make," Kelly said.
NEWS
March 4, 2010
We were very disappointed to read in the Sun on Tuesday that the Maryland Department of the Environment had approved a request from ExxonMobil to stop monitoring 130 residential wells it had contaminated in Jacksonville in 2006 and to discontinue bottled water to 126 homes ("Exxon ruling draws protest," Mar. 2). While the recovery and remediation work has had significant success in retrieving gasoline and its related contaminants, this man-made disaster has not always been predictable, and residents whose homes and lives have been impacted should not be subject to uncertainty about the safety of their well water until it is clear that the entire area is completely clear of MTBE and other contaminants from the 26,000 gallon leak.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | March 22, 2012
A federal judge signed off on a deal between government regulators and the owner of the Sparrows Point steel plant requiring the company only to look near its shoreline for toxic contaminants it might need to clean up. U.S. District Court Judge J. Frederick Motz accepted an agreement between RG Steel and the Environmental Protection Agency and Maryland Department of the Environment on how far into surrounding waters the company needs to look for...
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | January 20, 2013
State environmental officials are drilling monitoring wells on the outskirts of Salisbury to get a better handle on ground-water contamination there that has fouled dozens of household wells with a potentially cancer-causing chemical, according to a spokesman. The Maryland Department of the Environment has contracted to install a total of 10 wells in the residential area south of the city to gather more information on the movement and severity of contaminated ground water, said Jay Apperson, the agency's deputy communications director.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | May 10, 2014
The would-be developers of a residential neighborhood in Frederick are suing the federal government over alleged groundwater contamination from neighboring Fort Detrick. Waverley View Investors LLC, which owns 92 acres near the long-standing center for biological research, says "the U.S. Army's negligence in its chemical handling and disposal practices" dating back decades has led to levels of trichloroethylene of up to 42 times the federal maximum contaminant level. The corporation, based in McLean, Va., says the contamination has prevented it from realizing plans to develop the land for 732 homes.
NEWS
By Alan J. Craver and Alan J. Craver,Staff Writer | May 17, 1992
Joppatowne resident Thomas Mathison had one main question at a hearing on the Army's plans to clean up two contaminated sites at Aberdeen Proving Ground.Why, Mathison asked, has the Army waited so many years to start the work?Mathison was one of about a dozen citizens attending Monday's public hearing on the Army's proposals to clean up the sites, both of which are at the Edgewood Area of the proving ground.Residents attending the hearing did not question the Army's general plan for the cleanup.
NEWS
By Erik Nelson and Erik Nelson,Sun Staff Writer | May 27, 1994
Experts told Woodbine residents Wednesday night that contaminants from the Carrs Mill Landfill don't appear to be migrating across a stream to neighboring homes but that they can't be certain.James W. Mercer, president and principal hydrogeologist for Virginia-based GeoTrans Inc., told about 15 residents at Glenwood Middle School that the contaminants are draining into Cattail Creek.His company conducted a $139,000 study of contamination at the landfill and how to clean it up.Responding to questions about possible migration of the chemicals through ground water under the creek, he said his conclusion is supported by water samples collected from wells on the eastern, or landfill side of the creek, and from contaminants found in the creek itself.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | May 10, 2014
The would-be developers of a residential neighborhood in Frederick are suing the federal government over alleged groundwater contamination from neighboring Fort Detrick. Waverley View Investors LLC, which owns 92 acres near the long-standing center for biological research, says "the U.S. Army's negligence in its chemical handling and disposal practices" dating back decades has led to levels of trichloroethylene of up to 42 times the federal maximum contaminant level. The corporation, based in McLean, Va., says the contamination has prevented it from realizing plans to develop the land for 732 homes.
NEWS
January 7, 2014
Thank you for Tim Wheeler 's article on opposition to the construction of a new natural gas pipeline because of the effects it may have on local water supplies ("Pipeline may affect drinking water, activists fear," Jan. 1). There are other reasons to oppose the building of this pipeline. Natural gas is popular because it is inexpensive and promoted as burning cleaner than coal. However, when one factors in the greenhouse gas effects of methane leaks during drilling and transportation, it may not be cleaner than coal.
NEWS
December 6, 2013
The recent commentary concerning Harbor Point and the hexavalent chromium clearly describes the potential harm to the surrounding residents, but there is another issue that should be of a greater concern ("Harbor Point environmental questions," Dec. 2). The single monitoring well in Back Bay at the Living Classroom Foundation campus, just north of the Harbor Point site, has at least 40,000 times the concentration of hexavalent chromium that is penetrating the surrounding soil.
NEWS
November 5, 2013
In regard to the article, "Environment agencies delay Harbor Point work" (Nov. 1), Can you say cover-up? Can you say shady? Isn't it strange that the chromium readings are high in the area of Harbor Point? Has no one or no agency been monitoring the area from the early days of the original capping till now? Maybe it has been high all along and it just was not known or made common knowledge. Good thing to check on The Sun's part. Who did the last round of testing, and more importantly, who will do the next one?
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | October 31, 2013
A public meeting on environmental safeguards for redeveloping a Fells Point former factory site has been reset for Nov. 14, Baltimore City Council member James B. Kraft has announced. The meeting on the Harbor Point project is to be held from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. in the Morgan Stanley building at 1300 Thames St. The session, which was postponed from last month because of the federal government shutdown, will cover plans by Beatty Development Group to build a 22-story tower on the site of the former Allied chromium processing plant.
FEATURES
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | October 4, 2013
A meeting to address residents' concerns over environmental hazards on the site of the proposed Harbor Point development has been delayed because of the federal government shutdown. The meeting had been scheduled for Monday at neighbors' demands, but Environmental Protection Agency officials will not be able to attend because they have been furloughed, said City Councilman James Kraft, who organized the meeting. The controversial Harbor Point development, slated to house energy company Exelon Corp.
NEWS
By Katherine Richards and Katherine Richards,Staff Writer | June 16, 1993
About 40 Hampstead area residents and officials listened last night as Black and Decker (U.S.) Inc. made its case for a permit to pump an average of 432,000 gallons of water a day from 10 wells on the company's land on Route 30.The goal of the project is to contain underground chemical contamination on the company's land, said Randy McAlister, a hydrogeologist hired by the company.Several solvents used to degrease parts apparently leaked from the company's chemical storage area.The contamination was discovered in 1985, said LaVere M. Grimes, facility manager for Black and Decker's Hampstead plant.
NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,Sun Staff Writer | September 7, 1994
Howard County has fired the laboratory it used to analyze water samples collected from residential wells near Alpha Ridge landfill after the company reported findings that later were proved to be false.According to county documents released last week, Spectralytix of Gaithersburg told government officials Aug. 11 that the contaminant toluene, a suspected cause of cancer, had been found July 28 in two residential wells near the landfill.The report, later found to be false, appeared to confirm residents' worst fears, that, contrary to experts' predictions, cancer-causing contaminants found in test wells of the ground water at the landfill had spread to homes beyond the landfill, and with alarming speed.
FEATURES
By Tim Wheeler and The Baltimore Sun | September 26, 2013
Masonville Cove , a reclaimed stretch of South Baltimore's industrial waterfront, has earned a new distinction -- the nation's first "urban wildlife refuge partnership. " U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Director Dan Ashe was to announce the designation Thursday morning at the 11-acre nature area that's been developed by the Maryland Port Administration in a formerly abandoned and contaminated stretch of Baltimore's harbor. It's not a federal takeover, but the beginning of a new cooperative effort by the wildlife service to instill conservation values in urban residents, especially youth.
FEATURES
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | July 26, 2013
Honeybees responsible for pollinating crops worth billions of dollars are under attack from a cocktail of fungicides and pesticides that weaken colonies and make them susceptible to a deadly parasite, according to a study by the University of Maryland and federal agriculture researchers. The report, published in the online scientific journal PLOS ONE this week, said contaminated pollen from seven different test crops on the East Coast reduced the ability of healthy bees to fend off a parasite that causes them to starve to death.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.