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By Boston Globe | August 5, 1992
BOSTON -- A major study of Boston children shows that removing lead from contaminated soil in back yards can reduce the level of the toxic substance in children's blood, but not as much as had been expected, according to federal officials.A similar study was conducted in Baltimore, where children showed even less of an improvement in blood lead levels than those in Boston, officials said. The results of the Baltimore study have not been released.The finding raises fundamental questions about how a key urban health problem should be addressed and about whether federal Superfund cleanup of lead-contaminated soil would help, say public health and government officials.
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NEWS
Letter to The Aegis | January 16, 2014
I am writing in response to the editorial dated 1.15.2014 titled "Details, details. " My opposition to the purchase of the Havre de Grace property is that this entire property, not just "one of the properties" are contaminated. The statement, "contamination concerns seem to have been addressed," is not true. Who will take the contaminated top soil from the 4.585 acres and at what cost? Where will they put it? Who will cover the cost? When you put down two feet of new clean top soil, will the contaminated soil under this new soil leach up into the fresh top soil?
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NEWS
March 4, 1992
The Environmental Protection Agency has awarded $50,000 to a St. Mary's County citizens' group so it can hire an outside expert to review the federal agency's plan to incinerate contaminated soil at a Superfund site in Hollywood.Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski, D-Md., said she requested the grant to ensure that citizens' be heard on the issue of the planned cleanup of the old Southern Maryland Wood Treatment plant.The EPA plans to burn 100,000 tons of soil contaminated with creosote, pentachlorophenol and small amounts of dioxin, all probable human carcinogens, at the site.
NEWS
December 11, 2013
I was particularly pleased to read Gregory Wilburn's letter advocating for the state to rein in the use of road salt ( "Road salt is killing Garrett County," Dec. 7). Sellers of road salt have long promoted it as a "cheap" solution to melt snow and ice. However, independent studies have shown that government use actually costs about $1,200 per ton in infrastructure damage - in addition to the upfront expense and shipping costs. The studies flagged deteriorating infrastructure, polluted water sources and contaminated soil - all at taxpayers expense.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | August 3, 2004
About 600 tons of soil near the Chesapeake Bay that was contaminated by home heating oil during Tropical Storm Isabel last year has been cleaned up, state officials announced yesterday. The oil spilled when Isabel's winds and storm surges knocked oil tanks from their bases. The oil could have contaminated ground water and created a health risk for those who drink well water, said Dave Humphrey, a spokesman for the Maryland Department of General Services. In addition to removing the contaminated soil, state contractors reseeded the land.
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2013
The cleanup of soil contaminated by gasoline at two travel plazas on Interstate 95 likely will cost the state $2.2 million more than estimated, according to the Maryland Transportation Authority. Remediation work at Maryland House in Harford County has cost $2.6 million — far more than the $800,000 planned budget for both sites, officials said. Work is getting underway to assess soil contamination at Chesapeake House in Cecil County, officials said. The final remediation costs above the initial budget will be subtracted from the rent paid by Areas USA to the state.
NEWS
By Kerry O'Rourke and Kerry O'Rourke,Staff Writer | July 21, 1993
Miller Asphalt Products Inc. in Finksburg is operating according to state regulations and likely will be allowed to continue treating contaminated soil, Maryland Department of the Environment officials said last night.Ten people attended a public information meeting at the Reese Fireman's Building to discuss the company's application for an oil operations permit. Several asked questions about the plant operation and how it's regulated.The company, on Dede Road, has been treating contaminated soil for two years.
NEWS
By Carolyn Melago and Carolyn Melago,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | December 26, 1997
A former toxic-waste burial ground in western Howard County is being transformed from a neighborhood burden into the unspoiled land it was more than 40 years ago.With drums of toxins removed, contaminated soil hauled off and the first waterproof layer secured, the Carrs Mill landfill will be capped within months and blanketed with grass and shrubbery by summer's end, officials of the county Bureau of Waste Management say.Nearby residents were once concerned...
NEWS
By John A. Morris and John A. Morris,Staff writer | May 19, 1991
Toxic waste discovered in Brooklyn Park will eventually find its wayto New York, South Carolina and Massachusetts.Meanwhile, it sitsunder 24-hour guard on an 86-acre site near Mount Calvary Cemetery.U.S. Environmental Protection Agency officials had expected to remove 400 decaying chemical drums last week from the dump on Snow HillLane, north of the Beltway.Their plans went awry, however, when federal officials disqualified the private hauler whose low bid had won the government contract, said Walter Lee, EPA's on-scene coordinator.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | November 14, 2013
The developer planning to build a new waterfront headquarters for Exelon Corp. on the site of a former chromium-processing plant assured Fells Point-area residents Thursday night that the Harbor Point project could be built safely without releasing the highly contaminated soil and groundwater entombed beneath the site. Speaking to about 100 people gathered at the Morgan Stanley brokerage building at Harbor Point, representatives of Beatty Development Group outlined steps they would take to prevent hazardous dust from being kicked up when crews excavate through the clean soil and plastic capping the contamination and drive 1,100 pilings into the ground.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | December 5, 2013
State and federal environmental regulators approved design plans for the Harbor Point project Thursday, allowing Beatty Development Group LLC to begin preparation work at the former factory site, a state spokesman said. More approvals are required before construction may commence. The plans call for workers to temporarily expose contaminated soil while they install pilings for a 22-story tower that will become Exelon Corp's regional headquarters. The soil and groundwater contain cancer-causing hexavalent chromium dating to the site's use as a processing plant.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | November 14, 2013
The developer planning to build a new waterfront headquarters for Exelon Corp. on the site of a former chromium-processing plant assured Fells Point-area residents Thursday night that the Harbor Point project could be built safely without releasing the highly contaminated soil and groundwater entombed beneath the site. Speaking to about 100 people gathered at the Morgan Stanley brokerage building at Harbor Point, representatives of Beatty Development Group outlined steps they would take to prevent hazardous dust from being kicked up when crews excavate through the clean soil and plastic capping the contamination and drive 1,100 pilings into the ground.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | November 1, 2013
Plans to build offices and condominiums at Harbor Point hit a new snag Friday as federal and state regulators rejected the developer's plans for protecting the public from toxic contamination in the ground during construction at the former factory site. The Environmental Protection Agency and Maryland Department of the Environment called for many minor revisions to the Beatty Development Group's plan, which an EPA spokeswoman characterized as largely routine, with "no showstoppers.
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2013
The cleanup of soil contaminated by gasoline at two travel plazas on Interstate 95 likely will cost the state $2.2 million more than estimated, according to the Maryland Transportation Authority. Remediation work at Maryland House in Harford County has cost $2.6 million — far more than the $800,000 planned budget for both sites, officials said. Work is getting underway to assess soil contamination at Chesapeake House in Cecil County, officials said. The final remediation costs above the initial budget will be subtracted from the rent paid by Areas USA to the state.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | August 3, 2004
About 600 tons of soil near the Chesapeake Bay that was contaminated by home heating oil during Tropical Storm Isabel last year has been cleaned up, state officials announced yesterday. The oil spilled when Isabel's winds and storm surges knocked oil tanks from their bases. The oil could have contaminated ground water and created a health risk for those who drink well water, said Dave Humphrey, a spokesman for the Maryland Department of General Services. In addition to removing the contaminated soil, state contractors reseeded the land.
NEWS
By Lane Harvey Brown and Lane Harvey Brown,SUN STAFF | July 18, 2003
Army officials shared with a small group of Harford community residents last night plans to clean up contaminated soil at a site on the Bush River once used to process radioactive waste for deep-sea dumping. Workers contracted by the Army are to remove about 11,000 cubic yards of soil and debris from the 3.1-acre site in the Edgewood area of the Aberdeen Proving Ground, officials say. The project is expected to cost about $2 million and take about six months to complete. The processing site, called the RAD Yard by APG officials, was the East Coast collection point for the Army's radioactive medical and research waste in the 1950s and 1960s.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,Staff Writer | March 9, 1993
Even though a Harmans wood treatment plant closed two months ago, the company still must clean up a 14-year-old chemical spill on the site on Shipley Avenue, federal environmental officials have said."
NEWS
By Lane Harvey Brown and Lane Harvey Brown,SUN STAFF | July 18, 2003
Army officials shared with a small group of Harford community residents last night plans to clean up contaminated soil at a site on the Bush River once used to process radioactive waste for deep-sea dumping. Workers contracted by the Army are to remove about 11,000 cubic yards of soil and debris from the 3.1-acre site in the Edgewood area of the Aberdeen Proving Ground, officials say. The project is expected to cost about $2 million and take about six months to complete. The processing site, called the RAD Yard by APG officials, was the East Coast collection point for the Army's radioactive medical and research waste in the 1950s and 1960s.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,SUN STAFF | June 22, 2000
Carroll County residents living near Silver Run, just south of the Pennsylvania border, might have a better shot at clean water in the future. A new technique may allow contaminants to be vacuumed directly from contaminated soil, helping to clean up Keystone Landfill, a Superfund site in Union Township, Pa., 1,200 feet from the Mason-Dixon Line. Superfund, administered by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, was created by Congress in 1983 to locate, investigate and clean up abandoned hazardous waste sites throughout the country.
NEWS
By Carolyn Melago and Carolyn Melago,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | December 26, 1997
A former toxic-waste burial ground in western Howard County is being transformed from a neighborhood burden into the unspoiled land it was more than 40 years ago.With drums of toxins removed, contaminated soil hauled off and the first waterproof layer secured, the Carrs Mill landfill will be capped within months and blanketed with grass and shrubbery by summer's end, officials of the county Bureau of Waste Management say.Nearby residents were once concerned...
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