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By Mary Gold and Mary Gold,Contributing writer | March 24, 1991
With a greater proportion of people living in town homes, condominiums and apartments, the trend seems obvious. Growing things outdoors in containers is "the wave of the future."If the horticulture industry wants to keep up, they must cater to the potential buying publicthat people without traditional garden space represent.Seed developers are striving for plants that take up less space than the traditional offerings. There is more study of the dynamics ofroot growth in contained soil. The sophistication of the growing containers themselves has grown.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley and The Baltimore Sun | September 20, 2014
In the spring of 1981, when Marion Rodgers was a senior at Goucher College, she nearly fell on top of a box of old papers that would change her life. Rodgers was preparing an article for the student newspaper paper on a former author and Goucher professor named Sara Haardt - who later married the iconoclastic journalist H.L. Mencken. "I was putting away one of her scrapbooks in the vault of the library's rare book room when I literally stumbled over a box that was lying on the floor next to a shelf," said Rodgers, now a resident of Washington, D.C. "Taped on the top of the box was a message that basically said, 'Do not open until 1981.
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NEWS
By Nancy O'Donnell and Nancy O'Donnell,New York Times News Service | May 29, 2005
Container gardening: The fun art of creating and maintaining a self-contained garden. Annuals, perennials, compact shrubs, ornamental grasses, herbs, vines and even veggies, solo or in combination with each other, are what containerized gardens are made of. Creating one of your own isn't difficult; you just need to consider all these parts: Container This can be anything your imagination can muster up. Ideally, it should have bottom drainage holes and...
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2014
Richard William Parsons, a retired Baltimore County librarian who also spent nearly 50 years as a residential advocate for Towson, died of cancer Monday at his Woodbine Avenue home. He was 87. Born in Victoria, British Columbia, he was the son of Thomas Parsons, a commandant of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, and Laura Lyons, a homemaker. He earned a bachelor's degree in Slavic languages at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver and had a master's degree in library science from McGill University.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau of The Sun | May 31, 1991
WASHINGTON -- The Supreme Court, trying to answer definitely a constitutional puzzle that has been bothering it for nearly seven decades, ruled yesterday that police have broad authority to open any closed luggage, bag or box they find in a car they search.Casting aside a 1979 ruling and maybe a 1977 decision as well, and broadening a basic 1925 precedent, the court said the time had come "to adopt one clear-cut rule to govern automobile searches."This is the rule it chose by a 6-3 vote: If police stop a car because they believe the vehicle or a closed container inside may have something illegal in it, they do not need a court-approved warrant to search the car, or to open and look inside any locked or closed container there.
NEWS
By Alan J. Craver and Alan J. Craver,Staff Writer | August 24, 1992
The body of an 18-month-old girl reported missing Sunday was found in a container on the front porch of her family's Reservoir Hill home this morning, police said.Investigators are seeking the toddler's father for questioning, said Agent Doug Price, spokesman for city police, although no charges had been lodged against him.The girl's mother, Katrina Grimes, 18, told police she realized her daughter -- Shelby Marie Smith -- was missing when she woke up at about 6 a.m. yesterday, Agent Price said.
NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and By TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | January 24, 1997
Fireplace ashes stored in combustible containers have led to blazes that caused more than $137,000 in damages to three homes in the past 10 days, prompting fire officials to warn residents of the danger of ashes that might look harmless."
NEWS
August 7, 2008
Baltimore, founded as an inland deep-water port, now finds itself losing a competitive struggle for the container traffic that carries much of the world's commerce. The Seagirt Marine Terminal, opened 18 years ago to help the port of Baltimore compete for this lucrative business, is struggling to cope with an array of operating disadvantages that could cost hundreds of millions of dollars to remedy with no assurance of future success. A possible answer, port officials believe, is to lease the entire Seagirt facility for 30 to 40 years to a private operator willing to invest in making the facility a success.
BUSINESS
By Kelly Gilbert and Kelly Gilbert,Evening Sun Staff | April 17, 1991
Bell Container Co. has been fined $100,000 for paying kickbacks on defense contracts to a former purchasing manager at Belcamp, Md.-based Bata Shoe Co.Richard Brateman, Bell Container's vice president, accepted the fine on behalf of the Newark, N.J., box-maker at a sentencing hearing in U.S. District Court in Baltimore.Brateman, on authorization from Bell Container's board of directors, had pleaded guilty on behalf of the company in January to one count of violating the federal Anti-Kickback Act. The fine was recommended by the government in the company's plea bargain.
NEWS
By Melissa Grace and Melissa Grace,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | February 24, 2002
NEW YORK - Curiosity killed a cat - almost. The latest twist on this age-old proverb happened recently at Berth 80 Maher Terminal on the waterfront in Newark, N.J. It was there early Jan. 29 that a black cat was discovered - nearly frozen to death - in a huge refrigerated wine cargo container that had been shipped across the Atlantic from a vineyard in Italy's Tuscany region. Surprised Marchesi Antinori Wines workers, who found the frost-covered feline when they opened the 1,200-case shipment, feared the worst.
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer, The Baltimore Sun | September 12, 2014
Fall isn't just for mums anymore. Those round mounds of yellow, rust or purple are a poor way to celebrate the luxurious Mid-Atlantic fall - and ease a gardener's itch to plant something. Now is the time to refresh decorative garden pots with a rich variety of color and hardiness that can carry their beauty beyond the first frost. "Fall is a missed opportunity," said Kerry Michaels, who writes about container gardening at about.com. "The plants are on sale; it lasts so much longer than a flower arrangement.
ENTERTAINMENT
Mary Carole McCauley | September 8, 2014
A rare and previously unknown letter by George Armistead, commander of Fort McHenry during the Battle of Baltimore, is going under the auction gavel this week at an auction house in Chesapeake City, Cecil County. The May 3, 1811 letter, which has an estimated value of $20,000 to $30,000, throws new light about the commissioning of the giant flag that flew over Fort McHenry during the Battle of Baltimore. It will be auctioned off Tuesday or Wednesday at Alexander Historical Auctions on behalf of a private collector.
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | August 29, 2014
Baltimore may lose hundreds of jobs, tens of millions of dollars in economic activity and half of the port's containerized cargo following the state's decision not to build a new rail cargo transfer facility in Morrell Park. State and port officials scrambled Friday to outline alternatives to shoring up Baltimore's place in the international shipping industry ahead of the widening of the Panama Canal and the anticipated growth in Asian container traffic on the East Coast. The rail facility was meant to bring Baltimore's limited freight capacity up to par with other East Coast ports by allowing CSX Transportation to stack truck-sized shipping containers two high on trains for more efficient transportation inland.
NEWS
August 4, 2014
The U.S.-Africa Leaders Summit that officially opened today in Washington is as notable for what isn't on the agenda as for what is. The meeting between President Barack Obama and more than 40 African heads of state has been billed as forum for talks on security issues, foreign investment and economic development on the continent. But so far, at least, the recent outbreak of deadly Ebola virus in three African nations has remained absent from the official agenda. Mr. Obama needs to take this opportunity to strengthen cooperation between the U.S. and its African partners in efforts to bring the epidemic under control and provide the resources needed to prevent its spread.
NEWS
August 2, 2014
Your story about the closure of the last Stop Shop Save grocery stores in Baltimore is yet another sad example of why the city should move to repeal the bottle tax ( "Stop Shop Save to close remaining Baltimore locations," July 22). The bottle tax is hurting independent grocery stores like Stop Shop Save. This legislation, which exists nowhere else in the country, has made it nearly impossible for city-based grocers to compete with stores across the county line that don't have to pay the tax. The beverage container tax was increased on July 1, 2013, by 3 cents for every bottle and can of water, iced tea, soft drinks and juices.
FEATURES
By Liz Atwood, For The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2014
Fe Reyes-Dollete and Roldolfo Dollete's patio container garden grew out of desperation. For 30 years the couple, who are both physicians, tried to grow flowers and vegetables on their suburban property, only to watch deer consume all they grew. Reyes-Dollete recalls one year she managed to grow a particularly beautiful daylily. She went to get her camera to take a picture of it, and when she returned it was gone, eaten by a deer she saw standing in the yard. The couple decided to move their garden to their patio.
NEWS
By Patrick Gilbert and Patrick Gilbert,Evening Sun Staff | April 16, 1991
Baltimore's controversial beverage-container tax moved one step closer to repeal last night when the City Council gave preliminary approval to a bill that would end the tax May 31.The measure received 13 votes. But six of the 19 members of the council abstained, contending the council should not repeal the levy without having a sure source of revenue to replace it.The container tax was imposed in 1989 as an additional source of money for a city having difficulty coming up with enough revenue to support its services.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | July 12, 2005
BAGHDAD, Iraq -Ten Sunni Muslim tribesmen died while American-trained Iraqi police commandos kept them in an airtight container for more than six hours in 115-degree heat, outraged Sunni clerics and politicians charged yesterday. Iraqi authorities launched an investigation into the deaths and suspended three top officers from the commando unit involved, an Interior Ministry official said on condition of anonymity. U.S. officials said they had no information on what had taken place. No American soldiers were involved in the incident.
NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | June 19, 2014
A Baltimore police officer slit the throat of a dog officers had under control and now faces felony animal cruelty charges, the department said Wednesday. Police Deputy Commissioner Dean Palmere called the killing "outrageous and unacceptable" and said internal affairs is investigating the incident, which took place Saturday morning in Brewers Hill. Baltimore City Councilman Robert W. Curran, council liaison to the Mayor's Anti-Animal Abuse Advisory Commission, said there was no reason to have killed the dog if it was restrained with a dog-control pole, as police say it was. "It's pretty astounding that our public safety officers would ever have done this," Curran said.
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | April 8, 2014
The port of Baltimore handled more automobiles, cargo containers and wood pulp in 2013 than ever before, a record-setting performance despite continuing labor unrest on its public docks. Solidifying its place as the nation's No. 1 port for automobile imports and exports, the Maryland Port Administration said Tuesday that it handled 749,100 cars and trucks in 2013, up from 652,000 in 2012. The increase was due in part to newly inked contracts with auto manufacturers, including a five-year deal with Mazda announced in August.
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