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HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | October 31, 2012
If your Halloween costume includes contact lenses to give your eyes the scary look of a werewolf or vampire, you may want to consider the dangers, especially if you don't get them from a doctor. The American Optometric Association said contact lenses should be fitted by a physician. Yet 28 percent of people  who buy colored contacts for Halloween buy them illegally. We're talking from gas stations, flea markets, beauty salons and the Internet. The doctors group said doing this is putting people at risk for bacterial infections, allergic reactions and irreversible eye sight loss.
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HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | October 15, 2013
Wearing cosmetic contact lenses might seem like a nice way to finish off a good Halloween costume, but they can cause serious eye injury, according to an association of ophthalmologists. Non-prescription contacts have been illegal since 2005 because they are considered medical devices but are still available in some stores and online, and customers seeking to augment their holiday outfits. Wearing them can result in permanent vision loss, according to the American Academy of Ophthalmology . They may not be manufactured to meet federal health and safety standards, the group says, and cause cuts and sores in the protective layer of the iris and pupil or bacterial infections.
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FEATURES
By Mike Royko and Mike Royko,Tribune Media Services | September 14, 1990
(Mike Royko is on vacation. While he is away, we ar repeating some of his favorite columns from the past.)HE WAS BENT over a sink in the office men's room, poking a finger into his eye and muttering.I asked him what his problem was."The air. Must be a lot of pollution or something. It goofs up my contact lenses."No, I scoffed, his problem wasn't the air. His problem was the vanity of those who insist on wearing contact lenses because they think it makes them look better and conceals a minor physical flaw.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | November 14, 2012
Dr. Joshua Breschkin, a retired optometrist whose early work with contact lenses earned him the respect of well-known Baltimore Colts and Orioles players, died of stroke complications Nov. 6 at his Cross Keys home. He was 94. "He saved my career in pro football," said former Baltimore Colts wide receiver Raymond Berry . "Dr. Breschkin was on the cutting edge of contact lens technology. He came up with something that was stable enough to take the hits during a game. He was a dear man to me. " Born in Baltimore and raised on Woodhaven Avenue in Northwest Baltimore, he was the son of Meyer and Lillian Schuchat Breschkin.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | November 14, 2012
Dr. Joshua Breschkin, a retired optometrist whose early work with contact lenses earned him the respect of well-known Baltimore Colts and Orioles players, died of stroke complications Nov. 6 at his Cross Keys home. He was 94. "He saved my career in pro football," said former Baltimore Colts wide receiver Raymond Berry . "Dr. Breschkin was on the cutting edge of contact lens technology. He came up with something that was stable enough to take the hits during a game. He was a dear man to me. " Born in Baltimore and raised on Woodhaven Avenue in Northwest Baltimore, he was the son of Meyer and Lillian Schuchat Breschkin.
SPORTS
By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,SUN STAFF | September 2, 2004
ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. - Jay Gibbons seems to have regained his batting eye since the Orioles activated him from the disabled list. Next year, he'll be looking through contact lenses. Gibbons removed the lenses last month because he felt uncomfortable with them, and because of a hitless streak that made him just as unsettled. He had hit safely in six of his past seven games, going 11-for-29 (.379). He doesn't look like a guy whose vision needs adjusting. "I feel a lot better," he said.
BUSINESS
By Liz F. Kay, The Baltimore Sun | May 1, 2010
Years after laws were enacted to ensure consumers can shop where they want for contact lenses and eyeglasses, some patients still meet resistance getting copies of their vision prescriptions. "I still get plenty of people complaining that they're having trouble getting them from their eye doctors," said Ira Mitchell. The Minnesota-based blogger offers advice about purchasing glasses online at glassyeyes.com. The Federal Trade Commission enforces the Fairness to Contact Lens Consumers Act, passed in 2003, as well as the Contact Lens Rule and the Eyeglass Rule.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | December 20, 1996
Maryland and 21 other states have filed an antitrust lawsuit in federal court against three major contact lens manufacturers, who allegedly conspired to keep consumers from purchasing contact lenses from discount retailers, Attorney General J. Joseph Curran said yesterday.The lawsuit, filed in U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of New York, alleges that Vistakon (a Johnson & Johnson Inc. company), Bausch & Lomb Inc., CIBA Vision Corp. and various optometrists through their professional associations conspired to limit consumer access to discount lenses by controlling access to the prescriptions needed to obtain the lenses.
NEWS
December 27, 1999
Imagine life without the plastic development in the last 100 years -- from your nylon stockings to your contact lenses. The Greek word "Plastikos" means it plastic is the moleblages of carbon, hydrogen, oxygen and other atoms are unwiedly chain or ring structures that can't be packed closely, so they are flexible. The first 19th-century plastics were cellulose-based: Bandaging material, billiard balls, false teeth, combs, shirt collars. New each year the world produces about 225 billion pounds of plastic -- press-on fingernails, hip-replacement joints, Spandex, packing peanuts, cheap explosives for terrorists.
NEWS
By Sue Miller and Sue Miller,Evening Sun Staff | September 20, 1990
UNIVERSAL CITY, Calif. -- An ultraviolet-light device may soon protect the eyes of millions of American contact-lens wearers from infections and scarring that can lead to corneal transplants or blindness.The prototype, designed by a University of Maryland School of Medicine corneal specialist and his research associate, is now awaiting U.S. Food and Drug Administration clearance.Within the next two years, contact-lens wearers could pay about $75 for a 2 1/2 -inch-by-3-inch ultraviolet, or UV, unit that would clean and sterilize their lenses in 30 minutes, Dr. Verinder S. Nirankari said.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | October 31, 2012
If your Halloween costume includes contact lenses to give your eyes the scary look of a werewolf or vampire, you may want to consider the dangers, especially if you don't get them from a doctor. The American Optometric Association said contact lenses should be fitted by a physician. Yet 28 percent of people  who buy colored contacts for Halloween buy them illegally. We're talking from gas stations, flea markets, beauty salons and the Internet. The doctors group said doing this is putting people at risk for bacterial infections, allergic reactions and irreversible eye sight loss.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jordan Bartel, b | September 15, 2011
I did a bit of a double-take when I saw the Pitt-tastic cover of this weekend's Entertainment Weekly . Clearly, the designers at the magazine have been reading a bit too much Esquire . The cover looks exactly like one of those fancy Esquire covers, minus the faux-handwritten headlines.  Don't know if this is intentional, an homage or outright stealing.  Oh well. We have a preview of the interview inside (on newsstands Friday, in which Pitt candidly discusses a variety of topics.
HEALTH
By Laura Vozzella, The Baltimore Sun | July 28, 2010
Lisa Kurts works out five days a week, eats right and stays out of the sun. Her beauty regimen gets more complicated from there, with injections, creams and prescription medication — much of it aimed at enhancing the beauty of her eyes. "Your eyes stand out," said Kurts, 44, of Millers Island, a regular at BE Lifestyle Luxury Medspa in Towson who uses high-end eye creams and a prescription eyelash-growing medication and has had Botox and Juvederm injections around the eyes. "I try to make them look as young as possible.
BUSINESS
By Liz F. Kay, The Baltimore Sun | May 1, 2010
Years after laws were enacted to ensure consumers can shop where they want for contact lenses and eyeglasses, some patients still meet resistance getting copies of their vision prescriptions. "I still get plenty of people complaining that they're having trouble getting them from their eye doctors," said Ira Mitchell. The Minnesota-based blogger offers advice about purchasing glasses online at glassyeyes.com. The Federal Trade Commission enforces the Fairness to Contact Lens Consumers Act, passed in 2003, as well as the Contact Lens Rule and the Eyeglass Rule.
BUSINESS
By Gregory Karp and Gregory Karp,Morning Call | July 29, 2007
It has been more than three years since American consumers received the right to get cheaper contact lenses, but word has been slow to spread. Since 2004 federal law has dictated that your eye doctor must automatically give you your prescription after he fits you for contact lenses. Doctors can't charge for it or make you sign a waiver. The point of the law, called the Fairness to Contact Lens Consumers Act, is to break the domination of eye-care practitioners selling lenses. A similar rule for eyeglasses has existed since 1978.
SPORTS
By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,SUN STAFF | September 2, 2004
ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. - Jay Gibbons seems to have regained his batting eye since the Orioles activated him from the disabled list. Next year, he'll be looking through contact lenses. Gibbons removed the lenses last month because he felt uncomfortable with them, and because of a hitless streak that made him just as unsettled. He had hit safely in six of his past seven games, going 11-for-29 (.379). He doesn't look like a guy whose vision needs adjusting. "I feel a lot better," he said.
SPORTS
By Ken Rosenthal | March 11, 1996
PLANT CITY, Fla. -- Ask Cincinnati general manager Jim Bowden about the volatile Curtis Goodwin, and he responds smugly, "We did our homework on him."Is that so?Goodwin looked shaky in the outfield early in this spring, so the Reds sent him to an eye doctor, and discovered that he needs contact lenses.Funny, the Orioles made the exact same discovery after they promoted Goodwin last June."I didn't know that," Reds manager Ray Knight said.Goodwin, 23, apparently thought switching leagues would correct his vision.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | October 9, 1999
University of Maryland eye doctors said yesterday that they will use mobile lasers to offer vision correction at sites around Baltimore in partnership with a Colorado firm. The Maryland Center for Eye Care, the ophthalmology faculty practice group of the University of Maryland Medical Center, will provide the surgeons, while Colorado-based ClearVision Laser Centers will own the lasers and provide the technicians. "Instead of owning five or six lasers, we buy one or two and move them," said Michael E. Bjoro, senior administrator for the department of ophthalmology.
NEWS
By Lisa Liddane and Lisa Liddane,ORANGE COUNTY REGISTER | September 2, 2001
In the winter, Denise Hess sat on her living room sofa to work on her needlepoint. Eyeglasses perched on her nose, she held out the fabric at arm's length, struggling to count the tiny squares. And the dance began. She adjusted her glasses. Forward. Backward. Up. Down. And so on, until she found that sweet spot in which the fabric didn't appear blurry. Hess, 49, a library technician from Yorba Linda, Calif., has presbyopia -- a condition in which eyes are unable to see nearby objects clearly.
NEWS
December 27, 1999
Imagine life without the plastic development in the last 100 years -- from your nylon stockings to your contact lenses. The Greek word "Plastikos" means it plastic is the moleblages of carbon, hydrogen, oxygen and other atoms are unwiedly chain or ring structures that can't be packed closely, so they are flexible. The first 19th-century plastics were cellulose-based: Bandaging material, billiard balls, false teeth, combs, shirt collars. New each year the world produces about 225 billion pounds of plastic -- press-on fingernails, hip-replacement joints, Spandex, packing peanuts, cheap explosives for terrorists.
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