Advertisement
HomeCollectionsContact Group
IN THE NEWS

Contact Group

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
March 28, 1998
THE CONTACT group of six powers gave a weak ultimatum to Serbian leader Slobodan Milosevic to end repression of the Albanian majority in Kosovo province: End brutality in a month or the world community would impose sanctions specified in an earlier ultimatum.Mr. Milosevic was not impressed. He gives in only to credible threats. In this case, the resolve of the United States and Britain were not enough to overcome the resistance of Russia, France, Germany and Italy.A let-up of police repression and talks with the shadow Albanian government in Kosovo might defuse the crisis.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By ROBYN DIXON and ROBYN DIXON,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 16, 2006
NAIROBI, Kenya -- Answering U.S. fears that Somalia could become an al-Qaida stronghold, the leader of an Islamic movement that recently took control of the capital said the United Nations should send an investigative team to ensure that no terrorists could pass through his country or hide there. Sheik Sharif Sheik Ahmed appealed to the new, U.S.-organized contact group on Somalia, which was meeting for the first time yesterday in New York, to help disarm militias and stabilize the country.
Advertisement
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 30, 1999
LONDON -- The United States and its major European allies have bluntly ordered the warring factions in Kosovo, Serbia, to accept a peace plan giving wide self-rule to the ethnic Albanian majority in the separatist province by Feb. 19 or face a likely NATO bombing campaign. The ultimatum yesterday by the six-nation Contact Group coordinating peace efforts in the Balkans was extraordinarily specific, dictating the time and place for negotiations and the intended outcome of the talks.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 30, 1999
LONDON -- The United States and its major European allies have bluntly ordered the warring factions in Kosovo, Serbia, to accept a peace plan giving wide self-rule to the ethnic Albanian majority in the separatist province by Feb. 19 or face a likely NATO bombing campaign. The ultimatum yesterday by the six-nation Contact Group coordinating peace efforts in the Balkans was extraordinarily specific, dictating the time and place for negotiations and the intended outcome of the talks.
NEWS
By ROBYN DIXON and ROBYN DIXON,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 16, 2006
NAIROBI, Kenya -- Answering U.S. fears that Somalia could become an al-Qaida stronghold, the leader of an Islamic movement that recently took control of the capital said the United Nations should send an investigative team to ensure that no terrorists could pass through his country or hide there. Sheik Sharif Sheik Ahmed appealed to the new, U.S.-organized contact group on Somalia, which was meeting for the first time yesterday in New York, to help disarm militias and stabilize the country.
NEWS
By Roger Cohen and Roger Cohen,New York Times News Service | July 20, 1994
SARAJEVO, Bosnia-Herzegovina -- Calculating the limits of their ability to defy the world, the Bosnian Serbs stopped short of rejecting a new international peace plan for Bosnia yesterday and indicated a highly conditional readiness to work with the proposal.With the plan already approved by the Muslim-dominated Bosnian government, the Serbian stance, however ambivalent, brings the possibility of at least a temporary peace in Bosnia closer than at any time in the 27-month war.Such a peace, if it came, would probably involve the presence in Bosnia of U.S. ground troops to police and enforce the agreement.
NEWS
March 10, 1998
REPRESSION breeds violence. Kosovo is a textbook example.The revocation of that largely ethnic-Albanian province's autonomy by Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic in 1989 triggered demands for independence. Since then, the spiral of violence has accelerated. In the past few months, secessionist guerrillas have been attacking police stations and assassinating Serb officials. That led to last week's bloody four-day sweep by Serbian police, which devastated villages and caused untold human suffering, including dozens of deaths.
NEWS
By Dusko Doder and Dusko Doder,Special to The Sun | September 1, 1994
BELGRADE, Yugoslavia -- Serbia's President Slobodan Milosevic has agreed to allow the deployment of international monitors along Yugoslavia's border with Bosnia provided that they also be placed along Bosnia's western border with Croatia, Belgrade newspapers reported yesterday.International monitoring of the Yugoslavian-Bosnian border has been a key precondition for an easing of United Nations sanctions against Serbia and its tiny sister republic of Montenegro, which form the new Yugoslavia.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | September 4, 1994
EDGARTOWN, Mass. -- In a new sign of division over the path to peace in Bosnia-Herzegovina, Russia has issued a strong private message to President Clinton warning him not to lift the arms embargo against the Bosnian government, administration officials said yesterday.Mr. Clinton said last month that he would press for a lifting of the embargo if the Bosnian Serbs had not accepted a peace settlement drafted by the Western allies and Russia by Oct. 15. The embargo bars arms shipments to all sides in the conflict, but hurts the Bosnian government most because the Bosnian Serbs are much better armed.
NEWS
By WILLIAM PFAFF | March 6, 1995
Paris. -- NATO is on its way toward a crash, as renewal of the Yugoslav war comes closer. Washington seems to underestimate the danger, its policy apparently a divided one, offering nominal support to the Contact Group's doomed effort to get a settlement with Belgrade, while giving new encouragement to the Bosnian and Croatian governments who have lost lands to recover.Many in Europe and in the U.N. Protection Force in ex-Yugoslavia are convinced that the United States is also secretly arming the Bosnian army to renew the war this spring.
NEWS
March 28, 1998
THE CONTACT group of six powers gave a weak ultimatum to Serbian leader Slobodan Milosevic to end repression of the Albanian majority in Kosovo province: End brutality in a month or the world community would impose sanctions specified in an earlier ultimatum.Mr. Milosevic was not impressed. He gives in only to credible threats. In this case, the resolve of the United States and Britain were not enough to overcome the resistance of Russia, France, Germany and Italy.A let-up of police repression and talks with the shadow Albanian government in Kosovo might defuse the crisis.
NEWS
March 10, 1998
REPRESSION breeds violence. Kosovo is a textbook example.The revocation of that largely ethnic-Albanian province's autonomy by Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic in 1989 triggered demands for independence. Since then, the spiral of violence has accelerated. In the past few months, secessionist guerrillas have been attacking police stations and assassinating Serb officials. That led to last week's bloody four-day sweep by Serbian police, which devastated villages and caused untold human suffering, including dozens of deaths.
NEWS
By WILLIAM PFAFF | March 6, 1995
Paris. -- NATO is on its way toward a crash, as renewal of the Yugoslav war comes closer. Washington seems to underestimate the danger, its policy apparently a divided one, offering nominal support to the Contact Group's doomed effort to get a settlement with Belgrade, while giving new encouragement to the Bosnian and Croatian governments who have lost lands to recover.Many in Europe and in the U.N. Protection Force in ex-Yugoslavia are convinced that the United States is also secretly arming the Bosnian army to renew the war this spring.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | September 4, 1994
EDGARTOWN, Mass. -- In a new sign of division over the path to peace in Bosnia-Herzegovina, Russia has issued a strong private message to President Clinton warning him not to lift the arms embargo against the Bosnian government, administration officials said yesterday.Mr. Clinton said last month that he would press for a lifting of the embargo if the Bosnian Serbs had not accepted a peace settlement drafted by the Western allies and Russia by Oct. 15. The embargo bars arms shipments to all sides in the conflict, but hurts the Bosnian government most because the Bosnian Serbs are much better armed.
NEWS
By Dusko Doder and Dusko Doder,Special to The Sun | September 1, 1994
BELGRADE, Yugoslavia -- Serbia's President Slobodan Milosevic has agreed to allow the deployment of international monitors along Yugoslavia's border with Bosnia provided that they also be placed along Bosnia's western border with Croatia, Belgrade newspapers reported yesterday.International monitoring of the Yugoslavian-Bosnian border has been a key precondition for an easing of United Nations sanctions against Serbia and its tiny sister republic of Montenegro, which form the new Yugoslavia.
NEWS
By Roger Cohen and Roger Cohen,New York Times News Service | July 20, 1994
SARAJEVO, Bosnia-Herzegovina -- Calculating the limits of their ability to defy the world, the Bosnian Serbs stopped short of rejecting a new international peace plan for Bosnia yesterday and indicated a highly conditional readiness to work with the proposal.With the plan already approved by the Muslim-dominated Bosnian government, the Serbian stance, however ambivalent, brings the possibility of at least a temporary peace in Bosnia closer than at any time in the 27-month war.Such a peace, if it came, would probably involve the presence in Bosnia of U.S. ground troops to police and enforce the agreement.
EXPLORE
March 15, 2013
Carroll Values Education, a nonpartisan community group created by parents to advocate on behalf of Carroll County's children and public education system, will host its first meeting Monday, March 25, at Winters Mill High School, 560 Gorsuch Road in Westminster. The 7 p.m. meeting is free and open to the public. Contact group founder Bob Lord at 410-861-0131 or email CarrollValuesEducation@gmail.com . For information about the group, go to http://www.facebook.com/CarrollValuesEducation or http://www.carrollvalueseducation.wordpress.com.
EXPLORE
March 8, 2012
The Lovely Ladies of Laurel mentoring group will celebrate National Women's Month with a program of guest speakers Wednesday, March 28 at 6:30 p.m. at Laurel High, 8000 Cherry Lane. Guest speakers include State's Attorney Angela Alsobrooks, Rep. Donna Edwards, Prince George's CountyCouncil member Mary Lehman and NBC News reporter Tracee Wilkins. The event costs $5, payable at the door. Reservations are due March 15. Contact group founder Celeste Hill at celestehillr@yahoo.com .
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.