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By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2013
WASHINGTON -- Sen. Ben Cardin has been pressing for what he calls a progressive consumption tax since he first arrived in Congress. More than 26 years later, the Maryland Democrat thinks the idea may have its best shot in a long time. Cardin, a member of the Senate Finance Committee, told reporters Thursday he is beginning to dig into the details of how such a tax might be structured and, perhaps, included in the sweeping overhaul of the federal tax code lawmakers in both parties are contemplating.  The proposal is broadly similar to the value-added tax paid in many other countries -- a tax on consumption rather than income.
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NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2013
WASHINGTON -- Sen. Ben Cardin has been pressing for what he calls a progressive consumption tax since he first arrived in Congress. More than 26 years later, the Maryland Democrat thinks the idea may have its best shot in a long time. Cardin, a member of the Senate Finance Committee, told reporters Thursday he is beginning to dig into the details of how such a tax might be structured and, perhaps, included in the sweeping overhaul of the federal tax code lawmakers in both parties are contemplating.  The proposal is broadly similar to the value-added tax paid in many other countries -- a tax on consumption rather than income.
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NEWS
By Julie Hirschfeld Davis and Julie Hirschfeld Davis,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 4, 2005
WASHINGTON - Federal Reserve Board Chairman Alan Greenspan advocated shifting the nation toward a consumption tax as a way to spur economic growth, adding his influential voice yesterday to the debate over how to overhaul the tax code - one of President Bush's top second-term priorities. The central bank chief told a bipartisan tax panel convened by Bush that some form of consumption tax - one that taxes what people spend rather than what they earn - would simplify the unwieldy system and encourage people to save and businesses to invest.
NEWS
June 24, 2013
America with its democratic system, rules of law, and open market economy has produced the best living situation in the history of civilization. However, our dreams have been curtailed the last 25 years as the rising cost of doing business in this country has reduced the ability of the average household to find employment that allows the same standard of living as the last two generations have enjoyed. There is a way to stop our slide and regain levels of employment so that we and future generations benefit.
NEWS
March 22, 2011
Any taxpayer faced with trying to understand the current federal income tax code has at some time wished for a simpler method to pay his fair share. In his op-ed piece, Senator Ben Cardin ("Deficit reduction must leave no stone unturned," March 21), suggests a consumption tax is the way to simplify raising revenue while eliminating tax breaks, loopholes and shelters. However, contrary to his message, his proposal does leave a stone unturned. The "stone unturned" is found when he says the consumption tax "...can be structured to ensure that those who are low income — and who do not pay income taxes — are exempt from consumption taxes.
TOPIC
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN STAFF | March 13, 2005
IF YOU HAVEN'T heard the term "consumption tax" yet, you will. After winning re-election, President Bush said that he planned to reform two fundamental institutions of government: Social Security and the tax system. Just as talk of Social Security reform has put "private investment accounts" into the lexicon, tax reform will probably do the same for consumption tax. It might well be the centerpiece of a Bush tax-reform package. Now, the basic way Americans are taxed is on the amount they earn, their income.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | February 17, 2005
WASHINGTON - The presidential commission on tax overhaul is considering a proposal to add a national sales tax or some similar levy to the federal income-tax system. The two-tier tax plan was one of several ideas floated yesterday at the commission's first meeting, but panel members stressed that it is far too early to reach any decisions. The nine-member commission has until July 31 to deliver its recommendations to the White House. Any tax-law changes as sweeping as those under review would affect every economic interest group in America, shift trillions of dollars within the economy and be the object of intense lobbying in Washington.
NEWS
June 24, 2013
America with its democratic system, rules of law, and open market economy has produced the best living situation in the history of civilization. However, our dreams have been curtailed the last 25 years as the rising cost of doing business in this country has reduced the ability of the average household to find employment that allows the same standard of living as the last two generations have enjoyed. There is a way to stop our slide and regain levels of employment so that we and future generations benefit.
NEWS
April 16, 1993
The Clinton administration celebrated the just-passed midnight deadline for filing income taxes in an odd way. It floated balloons suggesting that a value-added tax, a form of national sales or consumption tax, is under consideration as a means of financing health care reforms that may cost anywhere from $30 billion to $90 billion a year.Such timing was less than smart politically. Not only does the balloon float catch citizens at a moment when they are particularly allergic to the subject of taxes; it gives Republicans fighting the president's $16.3 billion jobs-stimulus plan further reason to charge that the Democrats are once again hellbent to tax and spend everything in sight.
NEWS
June 8, 2009
The economics of sin taxes are fairly simple but ruthlessly reliable. Raise the price of something that's not good for people - alcohol and cigarettes, for instance - and they will buy less of it. This has not only helped finance government but saved countless lives. So a new proposal under review by Congress - a 3-cent excise tax on sugary drinks - may prove to be exactly what the doctor ordered. Not only if it means slightly less consumption of sodas and sports and energy drinks but also if it can help finance President Barack Obama's planned health care reform.
NEWS
Thomas F. Schaller | January 8, 2013
As Washington politicians search for budget solutions, imagine if there were a magical revenue source that operated not unlike a national consumption tax that many conservatives prefer and would mitigate global warming to please liberals, all while helping repair America's infrastructure and strengthening our national security, to the delight of almost everyone. Actually, such a tax already exists: It's called the federal gasoline tax, and it's been stuck at 18.4 cents per gallon for two decades.
NEWS
March 22, 2011
Any taxpayer faced with trying to understand the current federal income tax code has at some time wished for a simpler method to pay his fair share. In his op-ed piece, Senator Ben Cardin ("Deficit reduction must leave no stone unturned," March 21), suggests a consumption tax is the way to simplify raising revenue while eliminating tax breaks, loopholes and shelters. However, contrary to his message, his proposal does leave a stone unturned. The "stone unturned" is found when he says the consumption tax "...can be structured to ensure that those who are low income — and who do not pay income taxes — are exempt from consumption taxes.
NEWS
By Paul West, The Baltimore Sun | September 19, 2010
The Maryland rematch between incumbent Democrat Frank Kratovil and Republican Andy Harris, one of the most closely watched House contests in the country, is turning negative. An opening shot by Kratovil, the first attack ad of the general election race, goes after Harris for supporting a proposed national sales tax. However, the congressman's commercial never mentions that the sales-tax plan his challenger favors would do away with federal income taxes, an omission that an independent campaign watchdog has called deceptive in Democratic campaign advertising elsewhere.
NEWS
June 8, 2009
The economics of sin taxes are fairly simple but ruthlessly reliable. Raise the price of something that's not good for people - alcohol and cigarettes, for instance - and they will buy less of it. This has not only helped finance government but saved countless lives. So a new proposal under review by Congress - a 3-cent excise tax on sugary drinks - may prove to be exactly what the doctor ordered. Not only if it means slightly less consumption of sodas and sports and energy drinks but also if it can help finance President Barack Obama's planned health care reform.
TOPIC
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN STAFF | March 13, 2005
IF YOU HAVEN'T heard the term "consumption tax" yet, you will. After winning re-election, President Bush said that he planned to reform two fundamental institutions of government: Social Security and the tax system. Just as talk of Social Security reform has put "private investment accounts" into the lexicon, tax reform will probably do the same for consumption tax. It might well be the centerpiece of a Bush tax-reform package. Now, the basic way Americans are taxed is on the amount they earn, their income.
NEWS
By Julie Hirschfeld Davis and Julie Hirschfeld Davis,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 4, 2005
WASHINGTON - Federal Reserve Board Chairman Alan Greenspan advocated shifting the nation toward a consumption tax as a way to spur economic growth, adding his influential voice yesterday to the debate over how to overhaul the tax code - one of President Bush's top second-term priorities. The central bank chief told a bipartisan tax panel convened by Bush that some form of consumption tax - one that taxes what people spend rather than what they earn - would simplify the unwieldy system and encourage people to save and businesses to invest.
NEWS
Thomas F. Schaller | January 8, 2013
As Washington politicians search for budget solutions, imagine if there were a magical revenue source that operated not unlike a national consumption tax that many conservatives prefer and would mitigate global warming to please liberals, all while helping repair America's infrastructure and strengthening our national security, to the delight of almost everyone. Actually, such a tax already exists: It's called the federal gasoline tax, and it's been stuck at 18.4 cents per gallon for two decades.
BUSINESS
By Thomas Easton and Thomas Easton,Tokyo Bureau of The Sun | September 23, 1994
TOKYO -- The Japanese Cabinet, in a move long urged by the United States, passed a major tax reform package late last night, providing a boost to the country's depressed economy.Theoretically, the tax cut will enable Japanese consumers to buy more foreign goods, thus reducing the yawning trade deficit it has with the United States and other nations.Prime Minister Tomiichi Murayama announced the tax package at a news conference, as the U.S.-Japan trade talks try to avert punitive U.S. sanctions on Japan, set for the end of the month.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | February 17, 2005
WASHINGTON - The presidential commission on tax overhaul is considering a proposal to add a national sales tax or some similar levy to the federal income-tax system. The two-tier tax plan was one of several ideas floated yesterday at the commission's first meeting, but panel members stressed that it is far too early to reach any decisions. The nine-member commission has until July 31 to deliver its recommendations to the White House. Any tax-law changes as sweeping as those under review would affect every economic interest group in America, shift trillions of dollars within the economy and be the object of intense lobbying in Washington.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jules Witcover | June 24, 1998
WASHINGTON -- In his campaign for the Republican presidential nomination in 1996, publisher Steve Forbes always evoked enthusiastic applause when he promised to abolish the tax code.But shooting off your mouth on the campaign trail is one thing and simply abolishing the code with a single stroke is quite another -- although that is precisely what the Republicans who control the House of Representatives have pledged themselves to accomplish. They have passed, 219-209, a mind-boggling bill that would require Congress to write a new tax system by July 4, 2002, then scrap the current code at the end of the same year.
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