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BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Staff Writer | January 19, 1993
NEW YORK -- Lester C. Thurow's message to the nation' retailers yesterday was akin to telling a group of cattlemen that people should eat less beef and more broccoli.The economist, whose writings are close to the top of President-elect Bill Clinton's reading list, told the National Retail Federation that the U.S. economy needs a shift toward investment and away from consumption -- that is, his audience's sales.In a keynote speech that sounded like an extension of last month's economic summit in Little Rock, Ark., the Massachusetts Institute of Technology scholar described a U.S. economy under siege by rivals that put their money into robots instead of recreational vehicles.
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NEWS
By David Horsey | August 5, 2014
There are endless metrics to gauge whether the United States is ahead or behind other countries. Finland does education better and cheaper. Russians and central Europeans beat Americans in alcohol consumption. But it takes only five minutes for the average American to earn enough money to buy a pint of beer -- far less time than in any other nation. And, when it comes to meat consumption, only the Australians come close to matching the amount of dead animal we eat in the land of the free and the home of the obese.
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NEWS
By Jim Jaffe | December 19, 2007
While presidential candidates natter about health reforms that focus on insuring more Americans, a quiet but potentially very disruptive shift in defining the problem is under way in Washington. The long-standing conventional wisdom that rising health costs are inevitable as the population ages is being challenged by a view that patients in comparable conditions are simply consuming a lot more care than they once did - without an improvement in their health status. The older view accepts that consumption will rise and seeks to focus on who pays (accelerating the existing shift to insurers, especially the government, whose share of medical bills has actually grown in recent years)
FEATURES
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | May 22, 2014
The consumption of alcohol at this year's Baltimore Pride festivities will be confined to two designated beer gardens within the larger event footprint, organizers said Thursday. "City officials are trying to crack down on alcohol consumption," said Kelly Neel, executive director of the Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgender Community Center of Baltimore, or GLCCB, which organizes the events. "They told us we had to fence in the entire perimeter of everything and have it manned by police, or have the beer gardens, which was their preference.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 2, 2003
DUBLIN, Ireland - Despite its famous brands of whiskey and stout and its thousands of pubs, Ireland's relationship with alcohol is not as historic or indulgent as the stereotypical hard-drinking Irishman might suggest. Until recently, Ireland's per capita alcohol consumption was far behind that of countries where a drink is part of the daily routine, such as a glass of wine in France, Italy or Greece. But over the past few decades, the Irish have surpassed their European counterparts with astonishing speed.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | December 25, 2005
WASHINGTON -- When handcarts of holiday booze roll out of Ace Beverage, a major capital party supplier, the typical load is far different than a generation ago. There's no Scotch "unless it's for an older group," said owner Steve Siegel, and no bourbon "unless they're Southerners." Vodka aside, there's little hard liquor nowadays, but lots of bottled water. The shifts all reflect what Siegel, 56, said is a huge social change: "Nobody thinks it's cool any longer to go to an office party and get drunk."
NEWS
April 11, 2010
Musical: The Theatre at AACC is rehearsing for "Urinetown," a dark and modern comedy about a water shortage that leads to corporate control of consumption. Performances start Friday. Page 2
NEWS
By Wade Greene | August 31, 1994
Siasconset, Mass. -- AMERICANS invented mass marketing and we tend to equate the robustness of our invention with national virtue.Yet we have been deeply ambivalent about the pursuit of goods and services.Our prophets have long railed against unabashed consumerism.Philosophical ambivalence is now being joined by ecological misgivings over the processes and products of consumption that pollute. The idea of over consumption is the result and the idea is being taken up by major institutions.
NEWS
By ASSOCITEDPRESS | July 31, 2001
BERLIN - Germans are losing their taste for their national drink. Beer consumption dropped 4.3 percent in the first half of the year to 1.4 billion gallons - 63.4 million gallons less than last year, according to statistics released yesterday by the government. Bad weather was partly to blame, with a belated summer keeping drinkers away from outdoor beer gardens. But also cutting consumption were a more health-conscious public and changing work habits, as fewer people do manual labor where beer drinking is a break-time tradition.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | August 3, 2012
  Cigarette consumption has gone down since 2008, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention . But other tobacco use has gone up. That includes use of pipe tobacco for roll-you-own cigarettes and cigarette-like cigars, the agency says. And that is putting a crimp in a dramatic 11-year decline in smoking. Cigarette use dropped 2.5 percent from 2010 to 2011 alone, the CDC said. But pipe tobacco is up 482 percent in the same time frame and large cigars are up 233 percent.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2013
WASHINGTON -- Sen. Ben Cardin has been pressing for what he calls a progressive consumption tax since he first arrived in Congress. More than 26 years later, the Maryland Democrat thinks the idea may have its best shot in a long time. Cardin, a member of the Senate Finance Committee, told reporters Thursday he is beginning to dig into the details of how such a tax might be structured and, perhaps, included in the sweeping overhaul of the federal tax code lawmakers in both parties are contemplating.  The proposal is broadly similar to the value-added tax paid in many other countries -- a tax on consumption rather than income.
NEWS
By Erin Cox and Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | July 24, 2013
The O'Malley administration's aggressive new plan to fight climate change calls for Maryland residents to further cut their energy use or face higher monthly utility bills. The plan, to be released Thursday by Gov. Martin O'Malley, also requires that more of the state's electricity come from renewable sources by 2020. Maryland's goals for reducing greenhouse gases are among the most ambitious in the nation. The plan requires stricter measures than previously proposed to meet the requirement set by the General Assembly in 2009 to cut carbon emissions that scientists say drive climate change.
EXPLORE
October 26, 2012
Sunday, Oct. 21, we lost former U.S. Sen. George McGovern. Although many will recall his disastrous 1972 loss to Richard Nixon and his subsequent leadership in getting us out of Vietnam, his truly lasting legacy will be his war on hunger and malnutrition. In 1977, following extensive public hearings, McGovern's Senate Select Committee on Nutrition and Human Needs published Dietary Goals for the United States, a precursor to today's Dietary Guidelines. It marked the first time that a U.S. government document recommended reduced meat consumption.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | August 3, 2012
  Cigarette consumption has gone down since 2008, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention . But other tobacco use has gone up. That includes use of pipe tobacco for roll-you-own cigarettes and cigarette-like cigars, the agency says. And that is putting a crimp in a dramatic 11-year decline in smoking. Cigarette use dropped 2.5 percent from 2010 to 2011 alone, the CDC said. But pipe tobacco is up 482 percent in the same time frame and large cigars are up 233 percent.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee, The Baltimore Sun | April 19, 2011
Kegasus, Lord of the Infield Fest at next month's Preakness drew animated discussion Tuesday at the monthly meeting of the Maryland Racing Commission. Tom Cooke, president of Cloverleaf Standardbred Owners Association and professor at Georgetown University, started the discussion by voicing his view of the Maryland Jockey Club promoting excessive drinking at this year's Preakness. "I know a lot about alcohol abuse," Cooke told the commission. "It leads to everything from verbal abuse to felony assault, drunk driving, spousal abuse and [more]
ENTERTAINMENT
By John-John Williams IV, The Baltimore Sun | March 17, 2011
There's a method to the maki madness. One past champion eats two sushi rolls at a time with quick sips of water in between. Last year's champ builds up an appetite by taking a long swim and bike ride before arriving at the competition. For others who have not developed a method — or a strong stomach — for the Maki Madness competition at RA Sushi, the restaurant has several garbage pails on hand. Just in case. In its third season, the brackets-style sushi-roll eating contest — based on the NCAA basketball championships — has grown in popularity and regularly attracts competitive eaters from around the region.
NEWS
May 10, 2010
Chris Bolgiano is to be commended for emphasizing that choosing to not have children is not only a meaningful life option but also contributes to curbing the world's population problem ("To be — or not to be — a mother," May 9). But her remark that "the birthrate in America is historically low" leaves the impression the U.S. does not have a population problem. Nothing could be further from the truth. Not only are we the third most populous nation in the world (behind China and India)
BUSINESS
By McClatchy-Tribune | October 31, 2008
WASHINGTON - In the most compelling proof yet that the U.S. economy is in recession, the Commerce Department reported yesterday that economic growth contracted by 0.3 percent during the third quarter of this year and personal consumption fell by the greatest rate in almost three decades. Personal consumption fell at a 3.1 percent annual rate in the third quarter, the worst showing since the recession of 1991. That was the lowest quarterly contraction in consumption since the 8.6 percent shrinkage during the second quarter of 1980.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | January 10, 2011
The firing of Capt. Owen Honors from the bridge of the USS Enterprise for making raunchy videos to entertain his crew makes it very clear that what goes on in Vegas no longer stays in Vegas. Not even in the bowels of a ship at sea. Not in the Internet age. That he didn't realize this when he produced, directed and starred in his gross movie night skits while he was the ship's second in command is all the evidence his superiors must have needed to relieve him of his duties — political correctness notwithstanding.
BUSINESS
By Liz F. Kay, The Baltimore Sun | June 27, 2010
Kimberlye Ullman had a long list of things to do after buying her Pikesville condo, but one item was a priority — a programmable thermostat. "It was on my list, even before furniture," she said as technicians from Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. connected the equipment recently. Saving money on energy bills is likely on many minds as temperatures reach sweltering, record highs and power-sucking air conditioners kick into high gear. Electricity prices have been easing after huge increases in recent years, but extreme temperatures drive up consumption and utility bills.
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