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BUSINESS
By Los Angeles Times | October 17, 2007
In a blow to the company that is poised to be the largest automaker in the world, Toyota Motor Corp. fell so far in Consumer Reports' annual reliability survey that the magazine will no longer automatically recommend the company's new cars and trucks to readers. The Toyota brand slid from first place last year to fifth place in the 2007 rankings, which were released yesterday, and Honda replaced Toyota in the No. 1 spot. What's more, "below average" ratings were given to two of Toyota's vehicles: the six-cylinder Camry sedan and four-wheel-drive Tundra pickup truck.
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HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn and The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2014
The state health insurance exchange continued enrolling consumers in Medicaid, adding almost 22,000 new people to the rolls in the last month, according to a report released Friday. The report said 376,850 people in the state have gained coverage under the federal-state program for the low-income since the exchange launched a year ago under the federal Affordable Care Act. Another 2,425 people bought private insurance plans in the last month, though the open enrollment period is closed.
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BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | July 6, 1991
Alaska Airlines emerged as No. 1 in customer satisfaction while Hawaiian Airlines finished dead last among the 14 domestic carriers in the first survey of the airline industry conducted by Consumer Reports.The survey indicated a high correlation between the financial health of the airline and its ability to satisfy customers.Honolulu-based Hawaiian, for instance, lost $121 million last year, while Alaska has earned a profit 18 consecutive years, including $15 million last year on operating revenues of $895.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | June 14, 2014
Revelations that a former Catonsville doctor obtained his Maryland medical license despite having a rape conviction on his record is sparking a push for criminal background checks of physicians - a proposal that has failed and been ignored in recent years. As recently as 2013, state lawmakers considered a bill that encouraged checks for a wide range of health care providers, including doctors. It breezed through hearings and appeared headed for passage, but was pulled after a dispute over a single word, and was not reintroduced in this year's General Assembly session.
BUSINESS
By CBS MARKET WATCH | November 5, 2003
SAN FRANCISCO - Consumer Reports rarely gives high marks to American cars, making its designation of the Buick Regal as the most reliable family sedan a milestone for U.S. automakers. GM's Buick Regal edged out the Toyota Camry and the Nissan Maxima in proving to be slightly less in need of repairs, according to the annual reliability survey of 675,000 car owners. Ford also came up with better-running models, with improvements at Focus, Escape and Explorer pushing those models into the coveted "recommended" category of the magazine's car-rating guide.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 20, 1999
Consumer Reports, the magazine millions turn to before shopping for everything from cosmetics to cars, is under fire from two auto makers in lawsuits that constitute the most serious attack ever on the 63-year-old publication.Judges in Southern California could decide as early as this week to send the federal cases to trial. Some legal experts say the lawsuits could have a dangerously chilling effect on the media's willingness to publish negative product reviews.The product-disparagement suits, by Japanese auto makers Suzuki Motors Corp.
NEWS
By New York Times | January 16, 1992
Much of the raw seafood sold in stores is contaminated or mislabeled, according to a six-month Consumer Reports investigation released today.The study was based on 113 samples of fish and clams that were purchased in 40 randomly selected supermarkets and specialty fish shops in New York and Chicago. The group found that 34 samples were spoiled, 50 were contaminated with fecal coliforms, and eight of 20 samples of swordfish had more than the permissible level of mercury. What's more, one-third of the sample, taken from a number of different stores, was misidentified, usually as a more expensive variety.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | December 16, 1998
CONSUMER REPORTS, that always sensible and steadfastly neutral tester of the things we buy, is out with a report on educational toys, just in time for the holidays.This year, the organization tested 30 toys marketed for their educational value, and 350 kids helped pick the winners.Don't worry, Consumer Reports magazine says, if you bought the Spice Girls and tried to convince yourself that they have learning value. "Even the ubiquitous Beanie Babies can have a place in a child's development," advises CR.Sunday, we'll look at some of the toys designed to foster better reading.
BUSINESS
By Detroit Free Press | March 2, 2008
WASHINGTON -- Foreign automakers dominate the market for reliability and design in the eyes of Consumer Reports, while a Detroit model cracked the magazine's top picks for the first time since 2005. In its annual automotive report, the influential magazine last week applauded Ford Motor Co. and General Motors Corp. for making improvements. The lone Detroit model to win a category was the Chevrolet Silverado in pickups. The reviewers lauded Ford for improving quality, and praised some of GM's newer models, such as its midsize sedans.
FEATURES
By McClatchy News Service | January 12, 1992
If you're racking up those frequent-flier miles, wouldn't it be nice to know that you're doing it with an airline that's giving you a good shake?The people who publish the Consumer Reports Travel Letter think so. A reliable friend to bargain-minded travelers everywhere, the Consumer Reports Travel Letter (subscriptions: [800] 999-7959) frequently ferrets out the best and worst in travel, and it recently turned its attention to the airlines' frequent-flier programs.Which one is best for you?
BUSINESS
Eileen Ambrose | June 3, 2013
This is typically the busiest month for moving in the year. If you're one of those people who will be on the move soon, make sure you check out the company that will be transporting your belongings. According to Consumer Reports, regulators in Massachusetts and New Jersey sued movers for giving customers low estimates and then hiking the price once goods were on the truck. One mover, according to the magazine, threatened to sell the belongings unless customers paid up. Federal law restricts how much movers can revise initial estimates, but that's only in cases where people are moving across state lines.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | December 11, 2011
We want gift cards and like to give them, but for some reason we don't always use them and wind up wasting billions of dollars. A recent poll by Consumer Reports, for instance, found that one-quarter of people who received a card as a holiday gift last year still haven't used it, and more than half of those had two or more unredeemed cards. We have lots of excuses. We forgot about the card or lost it. The store didn't have any merchandise we wanted. Or the retailer isn't nearby, or we don't like the store.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2011
Last week's column on a little-known state group that helps consumers with medical disputes generated emails from readers asking if organizations exist that can help them tackle other problems. Many agencies can help wronged consumers. The Federal Communications Commission, for example, mediates phone bill disputes, and the new Consumer Financial Protection Bureau wants to hear about problems with credit cards. But before you reach for outside help, take a few steps on your own. First, contact the business directly and try to resolve the problem.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | November 19, 2010
Getting the best prices of the holiday season once meant traipsing to stores before dawn the day after Thanksgiving to battle long lines, huge crowds — and sometimes cranky customers — for doorbuster deals that came only once a year. This year some consumers might sleep in and skip Black Friday, the traditional kickoff of the holiday shopping season, recent surveys suggest. With stores promoting bargain prices weeks earlier and the increasing popularity of Internet shopping, some retail experts said, what is often the biggest shopping day of the year may be losing its pull.
BUSINESS
By Liz F. Kay, The Baltimore Sun | June 19, 2010
Temperatures are rising and beach season is in full swing — which means consumers are stocking up on sunscreen. But it's not as easy as S-P-F. Store shelves are loaded with sprays and lotions with SPFs, or sun protection factors, approaching triple digits. Some protect against sunburn but not long-term skin damage. Then there's recent research that found all but a sliver of sunscreen products less effective than manufacturers claim — and even potentially dangerous. And with all that confounding consumers, medical experts worry that claims of high-level protection could lull consumers into a false sense of security or fears about safety could deter them from using sunscreen altogether.
BUSINESS
By Liz F. Kay, The Baltimore Sun | May 23, 2010
No one can expect to escape childhood without a few bumps and scrapes. But federal regulators, manufacturers and parents are still grappling with ensuring the safety of products for babies and toddlers. Several widespread product recalls this year have stoked the debate — and made navigating the consumer market potentially heart-wrenching. At least half of more than 500 recalls by the federal Consumer Product Safety Commission each year are for children's products, said Don Mays, senior director of product safety for Consumer Reports.
FEATURES
By DAN THANH DANG and DAN THANH DANG,SUN REPORTER | August 8, 2006
For years, millions of shoppers have looked to Consumer Reports first before parting with their hard-earned money on purchases big and small. Whether contemplating forking over $20,000 for a Pontiac Solstice or a mere $14 on a dozen Nike Power Distance Super Soft golf balls, readers - mostly male, mostly age 50 or older and mostly geeked-out about research - have come to rely on the advertising-free magazine to guide the comings and goings of the dough...
BUSINESS
September 14, 1997
The grind: A survey conducted by the American Society of Chartered Life Underwriters & Chartered Financial Consultants and the Ethics Officer Association found that 57 percent of more than 1,600 U.S. workers polled report lost sleep or insomnia due to workplace pressure. Forty-eight percent of the respondents said they had headaches, while 37 percent reported workplace pressure made them depressed. Thirty-five percent said the pressure had made them gain or lose weight.Going retro: The idea of driving a station wagon might make you feel like Ward Cleaver, but Consumer Reports magazine says, "don't count wagons out yet."
BUSINESS
By EILEEN AMBROSE and EILEEN AMBROSE,eileen.ambrose@baltsun.com | November 30, 2008
The Big Three automakers need a bailout because we don't buy enough gas-guzzlers. The Wall Street Journal reports the government has less gas tax revenue to pay for bridges and roads because we've been driving less. Now we hear that retailers will go out of business if we don't shop till we drop this holiday season. Enough. Consumers have done more than their fair share to keep the economy afloat for years. We have the debt to prove it. It's time to let others lift up the economy. Or, as ethicist Bruce Weinstein says: It's OK to be a tightwad.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker and Andrea K. Walker,andrea.walker@baltsun.com | November 28, 2008
The economy may be forcing consumers to pull back on spending overall, but it is not expected to stop people from braving long lines and crowds for today's post-Thanksgiving deals. The hope from retailers is that customers will open their wallets and spend. Price-conscious shoppers worried about rising utility and food prices and falling home values are expected to crowd stores today in larger numbers than in recent years as they look for the best bargains, according to retail experts.
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