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Consumer Protection Act

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NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | September 15, 1998
Sears, Roebuck and Co. has agreed to pay $225,000 to settle charges that it violated Maryland's Consumer Protection Act in the sale of plumbing services to consumers by its former licensee.Attorney General J. Joseph Curran Jr. alleged in administrative charges that Warner Plumbing, a Baltimore-based firm li- censed by Sears to provide plumbing services from 1989 to 1995, used unlicensed workers and recommended replacement of fixtures when less expensive repairs were possible.In settling the case, Sears denied it acted unlawfully but agreed to ensure that only licensed plumbers will operate under its name and guarantee services performed by Warner or its subsidiaries.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 6, 2013
I am writing response to the letter writer who stated that the policy of forcing banks to give loans to people who could not afford them was pushed by Rep. Barney Frank and Sen. Chris Dodd ("Stop blaming Bush," May 1). The housing bubble burst in 2006-2007. The Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act was signed into law by President Barack Obama on July 21, 2010, way after the financial mess had started. The writer also thinks that the Democrats were ruining the economy.
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BUSINESS
June 8, 2003
A reader wants to know what disciplinary actions salespeople in a subdivision under construction can face if they offer misleading information to customers. Dear reader: Licensed real estate salespeople must adhere to the statutes and regulations governing their professional conduct. A licensed real estate salesperson may be subject to disciplinary action by the Real Estate Commission for making false or misleading statements, particularly if they deliberately mislead you, rather than by making a good-faith error.
BUSINESS
Lorraine Mirabella | January 9, 2013
  Two Carroll County plumbing companies and their owner have been ordered to pay more than $1 million after the state attorney general's office found work done by employees who were not licensed plumbers. All State Plumbing Inc. and All State Plumbing, Heating & Cooling Inc. and their owner, Wayne Garrity of Hampstead, also charged consumers fees for permits that were never obtained and failed to schedule required inspections, according to a final order issued by the attorney general's Consumer Protection Division.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | August 17, 2011
The office of the state attorney general ordered an Anne Arundel County home builder on Wednesday to pay more than $124,000 in refunds to customers who were building a home in Baltimore County, penalties and costs. The attorney general's consumer protection division says Steven Hessler and Charm City Builders Inc. of Pasadena violated the state's Custom Home Protection Act by failing to place money paid by the customers in an escrow acount or have a surety bond to cover the deposits and payments made.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby 6 | September 26, 1991
The state has abandoned its 3-year-old court battle against some new car dealers who charged their customers millions of dollars in "document fees" or "market adjustment fees" that were routinely added to the cost of vehicles, an official with the Maryland attorney general's office said yesterday.The state withdrew its appeal last week of a Harford County Circuit Court ruling in June that such fees did not violate the state's Retail Installment Sales Act.But Evelyn O. Cannon, chief of litigation for the attorney general's office, said that the state may use its Consumer Protection Act to halt dealers from engaging in the practice in the future.
NEWS
May 6, 2013
I am writing response to the letter writer who stated that the policy of forcing banks to give loans to people who could not afford them was pushed by Rep. Barney Frank and Sen. Chris Dodd ("Stop blaming Bush," May 1). The housing bubble burst in 2006-2007. The Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act was signed into law by President Barack Obama on July 21, 2010, way after the financial mess had started. The writer also thinks that the Democrats were ruining the economy.
BUSINESS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | November 15, 1995
Maryland's highest court ruled yesterday that homeowners cannot sue the makers of defective fire-resistant plywood -- used in 30,000 townhouses in Maryland -- because Maryland's consumer laws offer no protection to such buyers.The Court of Appeals ruled, 4-3, that a group of Montgomery County homeowners cannot sue makers of fire-retardant treated plywood.The decision essentially blocked the only avenue of redress for thousands of Maryland homebuyers."This is a black day for a lot of consumers and for a lot of homebuyers in Maryland," said Gary Mason, the lawyer representing the homeowners' group.
BUSINESS
Lorraine Mirabella | January 9, 2013
  Two Carroll County plumbing companies and their owner have been ordered to pay more than $1 million after the state attorney general's office found work done by employees who were not licensed plumbers. All State Plumbing Inc. and All State Plumbing, Heating & Cooling Inc. and their owner, Wayne Garrity of Hampstead, also charged consumers fees for permits that were never obtained and failed to schedule required inspections, according to a final order issued by the attorney general's Consumer Protection Division.
NEWS
By Douglas F. Gansler | December 13, 2011
"Balanced. " "Fair-minded. " Showing "great personal integrity. " These are some of the terms a bipartisan group of 37 state attorneys general used to describe former Ohio Attorney General Richard Cordray, President Barack Obama's nominee for director of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB). Add to that list "good public servant," the phrase Ohio Republican Sen. Robert Portman used to describe him just days ago. Sounds like a radical, doesn't he? If he's not, how else do we explain last week's move by 45 members of the U.S. Senate to block his appointment to that post?
NEWS
By Douglas F. Gansler | December 13, 2011
"Balanced. " "Fair-minded. " Showing "great personal integrity. " These are some of the terms a bipartisan group of 37 state attorneys general used to describe former Ohio Attorney General Richard Cordray, President Barack Obama's nominee for director of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB). Add to that list "good public servant," the phrase Ohio Republican Sen. Robert Portman used to describe him just days ago. Sounds like a radical, doesn't he? If he's not, how else do we explain last week's move by 45 members of the U.S. Senate to block his appointment to that post?
BUSINESS
By Liz F. Kay, The Baltimore Sun | October 16, 2011
The first reports of big banks instituting new fees for using debit cards and for certain checking accounts really riled customers. Clifford Rossi, a professor at the Robert H. Smith School of Business at the University of Maryland, is well suited to explain the banks' response to new federal reforms, with experience as an executive at financial institutions as well as a federal banking regulator. His research interests include the impact of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act on banking, and many say the new fees are a direct result of the 2010 law's Durbin amendment, which limits the interchange fees banks can charge retailers.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Erik Maza, The Baltimore Sun | September 29, 2011
An obscure provision of a federal law created to prevent identity theft has come under the spotlight in Baltimore, where a man has sued three area bars for violating the law's intent. In three lawsuits filed last week in Baltimore's U.S. District Court, Ronald L. Bradley of Baltimore County contends that three bars - Kooper's Tavern in Fells Point, Poncabird Pub in East Baltimore and the Middle River bar and restaurant Catches - printed the expiration date of his credit card in sales receipts.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | August 17, 2011
The office of the state attorney general ordered an Anne Arundel County home builder on Wednesday to pay more than $124,000 in refunds to customers who were building a home in Baltimore County, penalties and costs. The attorney general's consumer protection division says Steven Hessler and Charm City Builders Inc. of Pasadena violated the state's Custom Home Protection Act by failing to place money paid by the customers in an escrow acount or have a surety bond to cover the deposits and payments made.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | November 10, 2010
The state attorney general's office has filed a federal complaint against a political consultant who sent out an Election Night "robocall" to thousands of Marylanders suggesting that they "relax" because the race was over. Julius Henson, a longtime political operative who had been hired by the campaign of Republican former Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr., acknowledged last week that he was behind the calls after The Sun traced them to his company, Universal Elections. The complaint alleges that Henson and an employee, Rhonda Russell, violated the Telephone Consumer Protection Act by not identifying who was behind the messages.
BUSINESS
June 8, 2003
A reader wants to know what disciplinary actions salespeople in a subdivision under construction can face if they offer misleading information to customers. Dear reader: Licensed real estate salespeople must adhere to the statutes and regulations governing their professional conduct. A licensed real estate salesperson may be subject to disciplinary action by the Real Estate Commission for making false or misleading statements, particularly if they deliberately mislead you, rather than by making a good-faith error.
NEWS
By John B. O'Donnell and John B. O'Donnell,SUN STAFF | January 7, 2002
A real estate speculator and a mortgage lender who financed many of his property flips engaged in "misrepresentation and other deceitful practices" that "exploited a vulnerable group, first-time homebuyers with low incomes and questionable credit histories," a state administrative law judge has ruled. Administrative Law Judge Sondra L. Spencer recommended that Lee M. Shpritz, the real estate man; three of his corporations; American Skycorp Inc., the lending company; American Sky- corp's president, Lee P. Woody III; and a real estate appraiser, John M. Morgan Jr., be ordered to "cease and desist" from violations of the state Consumer Protection Act and pay unspecified financial penalties.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | November 10, 2010
The state attorney general's office has filed a federal complaint against a political consultant who sent out an Election Night "robocall" to thousands of Marylanders suggesting that they "relax" because the race was over. Julius Henson, a longtime political operative who had been hired by the campaign of Republican former Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr., acknowledged last week that he was behind the calls after The Sun traced them to his company, Universal Elections. The complaint alleges that Henson and an employee, Rhonda Russell, violated the Telephone Consumer Protection Act by not identifying who was behind the messages.
NEWS
By John B. O'Donnell and John B. O'Donnell,SUN STAFF | January 7, 2002
A real estate speculator and a mortgage lender who financed many of his property flips engaged in "misrepresentation and other deceitful practices" that "exploited a vulnerable group, first-time homebuyers with low incomes and questionable credit histories," a state administrative law judge has ruled. Administrative Law Judge Sondra L. Spencer recommended that Lee M. Shpritz, the real estate man; three of his corporations; American Skycorp Inc., the lending company; American Sky- corp's president, Lee P. Woody III; and a real estate appraiser, John M. Morgan Jr., be ordered to "cease and desist" from violations of the state Consumer Protection Act and pay unspecified financial penalties.
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