Advertisement
HomeCollectionsConsumer Electronics
IN THE NEWS

Consumer Electronics

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock and Jay Hancock,Sun Staff Writer | May 21, 1995
Labels on graphs showing the stock prices of Best Buy and Circuit City in Sunday's Business section were transposed. The chart showing Best Buy's stock performance was labeled Circuit City, and vice versa. Friday closing prices, however, werecorrect.The Sun regrets the errors.MINNEAPOLIS -- The boom box is black, sleek, portable and powerful. Detachable speakers. Bass booster. CD player. Yours at Best Buy for $119.99.It's an impossibly low price. Best Buy Co. Inc. paid something on the order of $103 for the boom box, to judge from its financial statements.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 24, 2011
Your recent article ("Democrats press Obama on jobs tour" Aug 15) lists the people on President Obama's economic team who have come and gone: Larry Summers, Christina Romer, Paul Volker, Peter Orszag, Jared Bernstein and Austan Goolsbee. Only Ben Bernanke and Tim Geithner remain. None of those who left or those that remain has had any affect on restarting the economy or finding jobs. Their only idea is more quantitative easing. They have all looked in the wrong places for jobs.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
By Leslie Earnest and Adrian G. Uribarri and Leslie Earnest and Adrian G. Uribarri,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 1, 2007
It was a return policy made in shopper heaven, but it became hellish for Costco Wholesale Corp. Customers at the membership warehouse chain could buy a snazzy big-screen television, use it indefinitely and take it back anytime. They could use their refund to buy a newer model - often for a cheaper price. Costco's generous policy was a big hit with consumers. "It was probably the best return policy in retail," said Jamil Brush, 30, a claims examiner from Los Angeles. "They pretty much would take back anything."
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker and Andrea K. Walker,Sun reporter | June 3, 2008
Got electronic junk? This summer you'll have another option for getting rid of it. Best Buy Co. announced yesterday that Maryland is one of eight states where it is testing a pilot program that allows consumers to get rid of old computers, televisions, cell phones and other outdated electronic gadgets for free. Consumers will be able to bring two items per day to a Best Buy store for recycling under the program, which began Sunday. The test program is expected to run at least through the summer and, if it works, will be expanded to the retailer's 922 other stores, said Kelly Groehler, a spokeswoman for the company, the nation's largest electronics seller.
BUSINESS
By SEATTLE TIMES | January 8, 2005
LAS VEGAS - If the Consumer Electronics Show reveals future trends, then the world is poised for a huge television-buying spree. The show features computers, phones and stereos in all shapes and sizes, but the 1.5 million square feet of exhibits are dominated by thousands of TVs, from tiny ones in cell phones to a 102-inch monster that Samsung calls the world's largest plasma television. All the keynote speeches this week have focused heavily on TV. Technology companies such as Microsoft Corp.
ENTERTAINMENT
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | January 16, 2005
As always, the offerings at this year's Consumer Electronics Show, just completed in Las Vegas, ran the gamut in size, serviceability and silliness. Here's a look at the most impressive products, people and punch lines at CES 2005: Best new big product: The new big-screen plasma televisions. They have new features and falling prices. You can get a 42-inch, high-definition plasma now for less than $4,000. Next year it will be $3,000. That's almost affordable for something that will make you drool.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker and Andrea K. Walker,Sun reporter | June 3, 2008
Got electronic junk? This summer you'll have another option for getting rid of it. Best Buy Co. announced yesterday that Maryland is one of eight states where it is testing a pilot program that allows consumers to get rid of old computers, televisions, cell phones and other outdated electronic gadgets for free. Consumers will be able to bring two items per day to a Best Buy store for recycling under the program, which began Sunday. The test program is expected to run at least through the summer and, if it works, will be expanded to the retailer's 922 other stores, said Kelly Groehler, a spokeswoman for the company, the nation's largest electronics seller.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG BUSINESS NEWS | December 17, 1996
RICHMOND, Va. -- Circuit City Stores Inc. said yesterday that its fiscal third-quarter earnings fell 37 percent as costs climbed and personal-computer sales weakened, even with sharp price cuts.The operator of consumer electronics and used-car stores said net income fell to $19.8 million, or 20 cents a share, from $31.5 million, or 32 cents, a year earlier.Circuit City had warned that it expected net income of 20 cents a share because of weak sales at the start of the holiday shopping season.
BUSINESS
By Rory J. O'Connor and Rory J. O'Connor,Knight-Ridder News Service | January 13, 1992
LAS VEGAS -- Asserting that computers are on an inevitable "collision course" with consumer electronics, Apple Computer Inc. Chairman John Sculley has outlined an aggressive plan to make his company a major force in creating a new generation of household gadgets blessed with computer brains.Apple's plan one day could put the company's software at the heart of a wide variety of sophisticated devices, such as "intelligent" digital televisions and telephones, and a new class of products that Mr. Sculey calls "Personal Digital Assistants," such as hand-held personal communicators and electronic books.
NEWS
January 13, 2008
IF YOU HAVEN'T ALREADY noticed, Americans are going increasingly crazy over electronic tools and toys. More than half the dollar value of presents exchanged last Christmas was for consumer electronics, credit card companies estimate. And, while a recession may loom, there was no sign of slumping demand at last week's Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas. The show, which draws thousands of exhibitors and several hundred of thousand of visitors every year, offered a mind boggling array of new or improved devices aimed at feeding our technological obsessions.
NEWS
January 13, 2008
IF YOU HAVEN'T ALREADY noticed, Americans are going increasingly crazy over electronic tools and toys. More than half the dollar value of presents exchanged last Christmas was for consumer electronics, credit card companies estimate. And, while a recession may loom, there was no sign of slumping demand at last week's Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas. The show, which draws thousands of exhibitors and several hundred of thousand of visitors every year, offered a mind boggling array of new or improved devices aimed at feeding our technological obsessions.
BUSINESS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,Sun reporter | January 10, 2008
To a tech lover, the annual Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas is sort of like a four-day long Christmas morning - but better. Thousands of exhibitors trot out their biggest and best in new technology toys, promising a year full of product releases, and possible pipe dreams - from 150-inch TVs to driverless cars. And Maryland's small delegation (17 local organizations and companies were there in all) held its own on the coolness factor, with Hunt Valley-based TESSCO Technologies' diamond-encrusted iPhone case and Towson University's role in making radio accessible to hearing-impaired people.
BUSINESS
By Alex Pham and Alex Pham,Los Angeles Times | November 3, 2007
William Wang likes being disruptive, and television shoppers are paying the price - a lower price. In 2002, when plasma TVs were selling for $10,000, the Taiwanese-born entrepreneur set out to sell one for $2,999. He fulfilled his ambition a year later, shipping a 46-inch model with a $2,799 price tag, about half what other brands then charged. Now his Irvine, Calif., company, Vizio Inc., is the No. 1 maker of flat-panel TVs in North America, outselling entrenched Asian competitors in the second quarter.
BUSINESS
By Leslie Earnest and Adrian G. Uribarri and Leslie Earnest and Adrian G. Uribarri,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 1, 2007
It was a return policy made in shopper heaven, but it became hellish for Costco Wholesale Corp. Customers at the membership warehouse chain could buy a snazzy big-screen television, use it indefinitely and take it back anytime. They could use their refund to buy a newer model - often for a cheaper price. Costco's generous policy was a big hit with consumers. "It was probably the best return policy in retail," said Jamil Brush, 30, a claims examiner from Los Angeles. "They pretty much would take back anything."
NEWS
By Martin Zimmerman and Martin Zimmerman,Los Angeles Times | February 11, 2007
It's a sunny, breezy Friday morning in Huntington Beach, Calif., and the parking lot of the Central Park Sports Complex looks like a cross between a Best Buy blowout and the Museum of Consumer Electronics. The jetsam of America's love affair with electronic gadgetry is stacked on pallets as cars intermittently pull up to unload more televisions, computer monitors, cell phones and the odd electric fan. Here's a wood-paneled Akai reel-to-reel tape deck, redolent of the 1970s. Over there, a carton of cell phones, some as big as a shoe.
NEWS
By Hanah Cho and Hanah Cho,SUN REPORTER | November 23, 2006
Inside a back office at the Best Buy in Columbia is a huge, wall-length replica of the store's floor plan - the kind of diagram a coach might use to help instruct players. Color-coded stickers highlight where each of the 225 employees will be positioned tomorrow - beginning with the 5 a.m. rush for steep discounts on laptops and flat-screen televisions. Red lines indicate where cash register lines will begin and end. And six green dots represent where workers will stand outside the store to make sure nobody sneaks ahead of the hundreds expected to be in line.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | October 21, 2003
Sony Corp., the world's second-largest maker of consumer electronics, plans to cut as many as 20,000 jobs, about 10 percent of its work force, by March 2006 as it stops making televisions in Japan and reduces administration costs, the Nihon Keizai newspaper said. "We are going to exit unprofitable business, sell or dispose of nonstrategic assets, reorganize global manufacturing, slim down sales and back office divisions, especially in Japan," spokesman Shigenori Yoshida said, without providing details.
BUSINESS
By Rory J. O'Connor and Rory J. O'Connor,Knight-Ridder News Service | March 23, 1992
SAN FRANCISCO -- Sony Corp., which late last year began selling the first hand-held CD-ROM player, plans to release a second, more powerful device in the United States this fall that will play more advanced CD-ROM XA disks.Microsoft said it has agreed to provide Sony with multimedia software, based on its multimedia viewer for the Windows environment, to control the player.It marks Microsoft's entry into the world of digital consumer electronics, an emerging market where it will face stiff competition from Apple Computer, which already has a partnership with Sony and is pursuing other deals with Japanese consumer electronics firms.
BUSINESS
By MEREDITH COHN and MEREDITH COHN,SUN REPORTER | December 7, 2005
The most common phrases uttered in a car this year, according to a recent insurance company survey, were "Are we there yet?" "Do you know where you are going?" and "You missed the turn." That's probably comforting news to the makers and sellers of GPS units who believe this holiday season will propel their technology further into the consumer mainstream. Sales of Global Positioning System equipment have doubled as average prices have dropped during the past four years. The latest, and top-of-the line, versions offer real-time traffic information, weather updates and new radio channels.
BUSINESS
By HANAH CHO and HANAH CHO,SUN REPORTER | November 27, 2005
Eric Strassman's holiday shopping list used to include more toys, sweaters and jewelry than any electronics gear. Now, technology plays a bigger part - making up half of his shopping list, thanks to lower prices and more choices. "Buying a camera 10 years ago, you had one choice. You bought the instant camera or the 35 mm. Now you have the digital," said Strassman, who lives in Lutherville. "If you wanted audio equipment, you either bought a cheap stereo or expensive stereo. Now, you have MP3 players and iPods."
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.