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BUSINESS
February 26, 1995
Grants, low-cost loans offered for home repairsSprucing up the house may be easier than ever with government-funded home-improvement grants and subsidized loans -- and middle-class homeowners are welcome to apply.Robert Berko, executive director of the Consumer Education Research Center in Orange, N.J., installed replacement windows and repaired his driveway with the help of a $5,000, seven-year, no-interest loan from his local utility company.He found the financial resource in the 208-page "1994 Consumers Guide to Home Repair Grants and Subsidized Loans" that his organization publishes every 18 months.
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BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | February 15, 2013
Attorneys General in Maryland and 29 other states have reached a $29 million settlement with Toyota Motor Corp. designed to strengthen protections for consumers impacted by safety defects and prevent miscommunication over faulty equipment. Toyota had failed to warn consumers in a timely manner about known problems with unintended acceleration caused by sticky accelerator pedals and floor mat pedal entrapment, according to a complaint filed Thursday by the Maryland AG's Consumer Protection Division.
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NEWS
By Capital News Service | October 3, 2007
The dangers and allure of marijuana, alcohol and other illegal drugs are well covered in TV commercials and school programs, but it has been a different story when it comes to inhalant abuse. Yesterday, the state Departments of Education and Health kicked off the Maryland Inhalant Abuse Prevention Program, intended to educate parents and teachers about the warning signs and dangers of what is popularly known as "huffing." The Partnership for a Drug Free America reported in 2005 that 22 percent of eighth-graders nationwide had used common household items such as cooking spray or air freshener at least once for a quick high.
BUSINESS
By Liz F. Kay, The Baltimore Sun | September 9, 2010
Sweepstakes company Publishers Clearing House will pay $3.5 million to Maryland, 31 other states and Washington D.C. as part of an additional court agreement resolving allegations of deceptive marketing practices, the Maryland Attorney General's office announced Thursday. Maryland will receive $40,000 for consumer education as part of the payment. A supplemental consent judgment was filed in Baltimore Circuit Court Thursday, modifying the terms of a 2001 consent judgment against Publishers Clearing House.
BUSINESS
By Shanon D. Murray and Shanon D. Murray,SUN STAFF | January 23, 2000
In advance of the opening of Maryland's electricity market to competition this summer, the state Public Service Commission will launch a $6 million consumer education program April 1. The PSC will employ newspaper, radio and television advertising in addition to billboards and brochures in the Herculean task of explaining to consumers what choice of electricity providers means. The campaign also will feature a Web site, consumer guidebook, and a toll-free call center. The goal, said PSC Chairman Glenn F. Ivey, is for the commission to establish itself as a neutral resource as competing electricity suppliers flood consumers with marketing pitches.
BUSINESS
By Liz F. Kay, The Baltimore Sun | September 9, 2010
Sweepstakes company Publishers Clearing House will pay $3.5 million to Maryland, 31 other states and Washington D.C. as part of an additional court agreement resolving allegations of deceptive marketing practices, the Maryland Attorney General's office announced Thursday. Maryland will receive $40,000 for consumer education as part of the payment. A supplemental consent judgment was filed in Baltimore Circuit Court Thursday, modifying the terms of a 2001 consent judgment against Publishers Clearing House.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | February 15, 2013
Attorneys General in Maryland and 29 other states have reached a $29 million settlement with Toyota Motor Corp. designed to strengthen protections for consumers impacted by safety defects and prevent miscommunication over faulty equipment. Toyota had failed to warn consumers in a timely manner about known problems with unintended acceleration caused by sticky accelerator pedals and floor mat pedal entrapment, according to a complaint filed Thursday by the Maryland AG's Consumer Protection Division.
BUSINESS
By Georgia C. Marudas and Georgia C. Marudas,Evening Sun Staff | February 27, 1991
Do you have to work overtime to pay your monthly bills?Are you unsure about how much you really owe?Are your monthly payments to creditors, excluding mortgage or rent, more than 20 percent of your take-home pay?If your answer is yes to any of those questions, look out.You may be teetering on the edge of a credit crisis, and the recession could push you over the edge, says Becky Cutler, chairperson of the National Education Committee of the National Foundation for Consumer Credit, a non-profit organization whose regional affiliates offer free credit counseling nationwide.
BUSINESS
By PETER H. LEWIS | March 16, 1992
CD-ROM, a technology that used to be as exciting as a 10,000-page statistical data base, is trying to enter the consumer and education markets on the coattails of its flashier cousin, the audio compact disk.To be successful in the consumer world, CD-ROM -- compact disks carrying information that can be read but not edited -- must prove itself to be colorful, musical, flashy, entertaining and inexpensive.Sony Corp. of America, maker of the Sony Laser Library CD-ROM system for IBM PC-compatible computers, appears to be on the right track.
NEWS
By Mary Gold and Mary Gold,Contributing writer | January 27, 1991
"Did you know that Burpee seeds were 50 percent off at Hechinger last week?" asked Lee Richardson.I had to admit that I had unknowingly missed the sale. Regrettably, most area gardeners didn't know, speculates Richardson, and there should be a way for them to be informedof such events.There are, he maintains, many more questions, most of them more universal in scope, that should concern the gardener as consumer.Richardson, a longtime Howard County resident, has been involved with consumer advocacy agencies and non-profit organizations for many years.
NEWS
By Capital News Service | October 3, 2007
The dangers and allure of marijuana, alcohol and other illegal drugs are well covered in TV commercials and school programs, but it has been a different story when it comes to inhalant abuse. Yesterday, the state Departments of Education and Health kicked off the Maryland Inhalant Abuse Prevention Program, intended to educate parents and teachers about the warning signs and dangers of what is popularly known as "huffing." The Partnership for a Drug Free America reported in 2005 that 22 percent of eighth-graders nationwide had used common household items such as cooking spray or air freshener at least once for a quick high.
BUSINESS
By Shanon D. Murray and Shanon D. Murray,SUN STAFF | January 23, 2000
In advance of the opening of Maryland's electricity market to competition this summer, the state Public Service Commission will launch a $6 million consumer education program April 1. The PSC will employ newspaper, radio and television advertising in addition to billboards and brochures in the Herculean task of explaining to consumers what choice of electricity providers means. The campaign also will feature a Web site, consumer guidebook, and a toll-free call center. The goal, said PSC Chairman Glenn F. Ivey, is for the commission to establish itself as a neutral resource as competing electricity suppliers flood consumers with marketing pitches.
NEWS
By Donna R. Engle and Donna R. Engle,SUN STAFF | March 20, 1997
A tabletop soccer game, bananas, hamburgers and a "shopping village" earned New Windsor Middle School eighth-graders community service credits toward graduation and garnered their teacher a state award.Sarah A. Thompson and students in her family and consumer science course worked with first-and fifth-graders at nearby Elmer Wolfe Elementary School on three projects to help improve literacy."The little kids relate very well to the older children, and the older ones want to be role models for the younger," Thompson said.
BUSINESS
February 26, 1995
Grants, low-cost loans offered for home repairsSprucing up the house may be easier than ever with government-funded home-improvement grants and subsidized loans -- and middle-class homeowners are welcome to apply.Robert Berko, executive director of the Consumer Education Research Center in Orange, N.J., installed replacement windows and repaired his driveway with the help of a $5,000, seven-year, no-interest loan from his local utility company.He found the financial resource in the 208-page "1994 Consumers Guide to Home Repair Grants and Subsidized Loans" that his organization publishes every 18 months.
BUSINESS
By PETER H. LEWIS | March 16, 1992
CD-ROM, a technology that used to be as exciting as a 10,000-page statistical data base, is trying to enter the consumer and education markets on the coattails of its flashier cousin, the audio compact disk.To be successful in the consumer world, CD-ROM -- compact disks carrying information that can be read but not edited -- must prove itself to be colorful, musical, flashy, entertaining and inexpensive.Sony Corp. of America, maker of the Sony Laser Library CD-ROM system for IBM PC-compatible computers, appears to be on the right track.
BUSINESS
By Georgia C. Marudas and Georgia C. Marudas,Evening Sun Staff | February 27, 1991
Do you have to work overtime to pay your monthly bills?Are you unsure about how much you really owe?Are your monthly payments to creditors, excluding mortgage or rent, more than 20 percent of your take-home pay?If your answer is yes to any of those questions, look out.You may be teetering on the edge of a credit crisis, and the recession could push you over the edge, says Becky Cutler, chairperson of the National Education Committee of the National Foundation for Consumer Credit, a non-profit organization whose regional affiliates offer free credit counseling nationwide.
NEWS
By Donna R. Engle and Donna R. Engle,SUN STAFF | March 20, 1997
A tabletop soccer game, bananas, hamburgers and a "shopping village" earned New Windsor Middle School eighth-graders community service credits toward graduation and garnered their teacher a state award.Sarah A. Thompson and students in her family and consumer science course worked with first-and fifth-graders at nearby Elmer Wolfe Elementary School on three projects to help improve literacy."The little kids relate very well to the older children, and the older ones want to be role models for the younger," Thompson said.
NEWS
By Mary Gold and Mary Gold,Contributing writer | January 27, 1991
"Did you know that Burpee seeds were 50 percent off at Hechinger last week?" asked Lee Richardson.I had to admit that I had unknowingly missed the sale. Regrettably, most area gardeners didn't know, speculates Richardson, and there should be a way for them to be informedof such events.There are, he maintains, many more questions, most of them more universal in scope, that should concern the gardener as consumer.Richardson, a longtime Howard County resident, has been involved with consumer advocacy agencies and non-profit organizations for many years.
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