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Consumer Confidence Index

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NEWS
By PAUL W. BOLTZ | May 16, 1993
The recession ended more than two years ago, the unemployment rate has fallen 0.7 percent from its recent high, interest rates are at 20-year lows, stock prices are rising nicely, the Cold War is over, inflation is around 3 percent, personal income is rising. Sound like good news?Apparently not. According to consumer sentiment surveys, the nation is still in a recessionary funk. Unfortunately, the survey becomes a self-fulfilling prophecy. Unless and until consumers feel more willing and able to spend, the economy will be moving at a moderate pace that falls well short of the booming 1980s.
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BUSINESS
February 24, 2010
NEW YORK - Americans' outlook on the economy went into relapse in February. Rising job worries sent a key barometer of confidence to its lowest point in 10 months. The Conference Board said Tuesday its Consumer Confidence Index fell almost 11 points to 46 in February, from January. Analysts were expecting only a slight decrease to 55. It was the lowest level since a 40.8 reading in April 2009. A reading above 90 means the economy is on solid footing. - Associated Press
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NEWS
December 21, 1995
Fabian Linden, 79, an economist who developed the consumer confidence index of the Conference Board, died of colon cancer Monday in New York City. He also wrote more than 40 books, including "How We Spend Our Money."Mr. Linden joined the Conference Board, a worldwide business research organization, in 1957. Ten years later, he developed the consumer confidence index, which measures consumer attitudes and buying plans and is widely watched by business executives and Wall Street and is often cited by financial analysts to explain swings in stock and bond prices.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | December 29, 2004
NEW YORK - U.S. consumer confidence jumped to a five-month high last month, beating the most optimistic forecast, as more Americans said jobs are plentiful and the outlook for the economy brightened. The Conference Board's index rose to 102.3 from a revised 92.6 in November, stronger than was first reported. Expectations for the economy over the next six months climbed to the highest level since July. "We expect the consumer to roll into 2005 on a high note, as hiring is poised to accelerate and income gains will pick up as well," said Stephen Stanley, chief economist at RBS Greenwich Capital in Greenwich, Conn.
BUSINESS
February 24, 2010
NEW YORK - Americans' outlook on the economy went into relapse in February. Rising job worries sent a key barometer of confidence to its lowest point in 10 months. The Conference Board said Tuesday its Consumer Confidence Index fell almost 11 points to 46 in February, from January. Analysts were expecting only a slight decrease to 55. It was the lowest level since a 40.8 reading in April 2009. A reading above 90 means the economy is on solid footing. - Associated Press
BUSINESS
By Kristine Henry | November 1, 1998
THE CONSUMER confidence index fell 9.1 points in October, to 117.3, the lowest in nearly two years and the fourth straight monthly drop, according to the Conference Board, a private research group in New York.How important is the consumer confidence index?As the holidays approach, what does the drop mean for retail sales, home sales and sales of big-ticket items?Tim MartinSenior economist, NationsBankOne way to put it into perspective is that the level it is now is close to as high as it got in the 1980s, when the economy was doing very well.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | January 26, 2000
NEW YORK -- U.S. consumers are starting the year more confident about the economy than ever before and ready to push the record-bound expansion well into 2000, a report yesterday indicated. Abundant jobs, a rising stock market and a Jan. 1 that passed without major computer crashes helped drive the consumer confidence index to 144.7 in January, its highest ever, Conference Board figures showed. "It's the consumer that powers this economy, and this is evidence that there's more fuel in this economic expansion," said Richard Yamarone, senior economist with Argus Research Corp.
NEWS
September 9, 1991
Consumer demand, the locomotive of the Reagan years, is in caboose position as this recovery (if it is a recovery) chugs along uncertainly. What is driving the economy is the manufacturing sector. As September began, the Commerce Department was able to report rising construction and a solid 6.2 percent jump in new orders for manufactured goods, a key component in what is now a six-month upward trend in the government's index of leading indicators.Compared with most other recent economic upturns, however, there is little sign of a return of the consumer to the marketplace.
BUSINESS
June 29, 1994
Home sales, confidence riseConsumers shrugged off rising mortgage rates in May and surprisingly bought more new homes than in April, the Commerce Department said.Sales rose 4.2 percent, to a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 738,000 units, and were a strong 16 percent higher than levels a year earlier, when they were at a 635,000-unit rate.In another piece of evidence that consumers are optimistic about their prospects, the Conference Board in New York said its Consumer Confidence index hit its highest level in June in nearly four years.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | December 1, 2004
NEW YORK - The Consumer Confidence Index unexpectedly fell last month to the lowest level in eight months as higher energy prices damped optimism among low-income Americans. The Conference Board reported yesterday that its index dropped to 90.5 from 92.9 in October, suggesting that retail sales are poised to slow. In another development, the Commerce Department reported that the gross domestic product - the value of all goods and services produced in the United States - increased at an annual rate of 3.9 percent in the third quarter.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | December 1, 2004
NEW YORK - The Consumer Confidence Index unexpectedly fell last month to the lowest level in eight months as higher energy prices damped optimism among low-income Americans. The Conference Board reported yesterday that its index dropped to 90.5 from 92.9 in October, suggesting that retail sales are poised to slow. In another development, the Commerce Department reported that the gross domestic product - the value of all goods and services produced in the United States - increased at an annual rate of 3.9 percent in the third quarter.
BUSINESS
By Robert Little and Robert Little,SUN STAFF | October 30, 2002
American consumers are suffering their worst case of economic jitters in almost nine years, according to figures released yesterday, a spooking that could spell doom for the holiday spending season and any hope for a continued recovery from recession. The Consumer Confidence Index, a monthly survey designed to measure the public's faith in the U.S. economy and labor market, declined this month to its lowest level since late 1993. Nearly 28 percent of the consumers polled described the current economic situation as "bad."
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | January 26, 2000
NEW YORK -- U.S. consumers are starting the year more confident about the economy than ever before and ready to push the record-bound expansion well into 2000, a report yesterday indicated. Abundant jobs, a rising stock market and a Jan. 1 that passed without major computer crashes helped drive the consumer confidence index to 144.7 in January, its highest ever, Conference Board figures showed. "It's the consumer that powers this economy, and this is evidence that there's more fuel in this economic expansion," said Richard Yamarone, senior economist with Argus Research Corp.
BUSINESS
By Kristine Henry | November 1, 1998
THE CONSUMER confidence index fell 9.1 points in October, to 117.3, the lowest in nearly two years and the fourth straight monthly drop, according to the Conference Board, a private research group in New York.How important is the consumer confidence index?As the holidays approach, what does the drop mean for retail sales, home sales and sales of big-ticket items?Tim MartinSenior economist, NationsBankOne way to put it into perspective is that the level it is now is close to as high as it got in the 1980s, when the economy was doing very well.
NEWS
December 21, 1995
Fabian Linden, 79, an economist who developed the consumer confidence index of the Conference Board, died of colon cancer Monday in New York City. He also wrote more than 40 books, including "How We Spend Our Money."Mr. Linden joined the Conference Board, a worldwide business research organization, in 1957. Ten years later, he developed the consumer confidence index, which measures consumer attitudes and buying plans and is widely watched by business executives and Wall Street and is often cited by financial analysts to explain swings in stock and bond prices.
BUSINESS
June 29, 1994
Home sales, confidence riseConsumers shrugged off rising mortgage rates in May and surprisingly bought more new homes than in April, the Commerce Department said.Sales rose 4.2 percent, to a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 738,000 units, and were a strong 16 percent higher than levels a year earlier, when they were at a 635,000-unit rate.In another piece of evidence that consumers are optimistic about their prospects, the Conference Board in New York said its Consumer Confidence index hit its highest level in June in nearly four years.
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