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By David Conn and David Conn,Annapolis Bureau | February 14, 1992
ANNAPOLIS -- A House committee finished yesterday a grueling three-day marathon on health care reform by examining a plan supporters say will expand health care coverage and lower costs by empowering the consumer.The system, known as the tax "credit/voucher plan," or "consumer choice," would require every Marylander to buy health insurance and every company to offer it.But instead of leaving the burden of payment largely in the hands of employers, House Bill 376 would give everyone a sufficiently large tax credit or tax voucher to buy the coverage himself, according to its proponents.
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NEWS
By Jeffrey H. Joseph | November 5, 2013
A little-noticed yet significant report card was issued recently measuring the progress of the fledgling Consumer Financial Protection Bureau thus far. The report by a Bipartisan Policy Center task force comes after almost a year's worth of in-depth review and analysis and seems to support what critics of the CFPB have been saying all along: This unaccountable bureaucracy harms business and consumers alike. While reading the report's characterization of the bureau's standard operating procedures, one is more likely to envision the workings of a Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde versus those of a federal bureau charged with protecting millions of consumers.
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NEWS
By TRB | November 25, 1993
Washington.--Critics who complain that President Clinton's health-care plan has ''too much government'' are onto something, but they don't have it exactly right. The problem isn't too much government; it's too much politics. The Clinton plan will force society to make explicitly, through the political system, decisions on painful questions like limiting choice and rationing care that will be made in any event.Alternative plans will make these same decisions covertly, and possibly less sensibly.
NEWS
By Marc Kilmer | August 5, 2013
With full implementation of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) less than two months away, Marylanders may expect their health insurance to become more affordable. It's right there in the title of the law, after all. However, if you plan on buying an individual insurance plan through Maryland's state exchange, you will probably be paying more for insurance, thanks to the ACA. Affordable insurance was a key selling point of health care reform. When he signed the bill into law, President Barack Obama claimed, "This legislation will also lower costs for families," and state-run health insurance exchanges would be a primary vehicle to help consumers realize these lower costs.
BUSINESS
By Kevin L. McQuaid and Kevin L. McQuaid,SUN STAFF | January 20, 1998
A coalition of businesses and power generators in favor of busting Maryland's monopolistic electric supply system urged lawmakers in Annapolis yesterday to speed up planned deregulation by two years.Calling customer choice for electricity "the most pressing consumer issue in Maryland today," the Alliance for Customer Choice of Electrical Suppliers and Services (ACCESS) encouraged the state's General Assembly to pass laws that would promote full competition by July 2000."Our message is very simple: Deregulation and competition equal lower costs and create improved products and services," said Tom Saquella, president of the Maryland Retailers Association and a member of ACCESS.
NEWS
By ANDREW RATNER | August 22, 1992
A conversation I overheard in the newsroom a few years agodefined the difference between city and suburban life.Two colleagues were talking about shopping at the Swedish furniture emporium, IKEA, just beyond the Beltway in White Marsh. ''You would travel way out there?'' marveled one of them, undoubtedly a city resident. I was taken aback by that reply, because I commuted twice as far to get home each evening.As shown by demographics and rising political clout, more people than ever are willing to commute past the IKEAs of the world to find a home.
NEWS
By Robert Kuttner | December 14, 1990
WE NEED universal health insurance because 37 million Americans have no health insurance to pay the doctor, right?Wrong. Our present system does leave a lot of people out -- but that's not the worst thing that ails it. Worse still is how it squanders scarce resources and increasingly denies freedom of choice to consumers.Conservative critics will tell you that universal health systems like the Canadian one are guilty of the sin of "rationing." The Wall Street Journal recently RobertKuttnerran an editorial column titled, "Canadians Cross Border to Save Their Lives."
NEWS
May 3, 2013
To the age-old question of how many conservatives does it take to screw in a light bulb, we now have a definitive answer: Just one, but it will take him weeks to chase down a vintage incandescent bulb because he won't touch an energy-efficient one. At least that's the obvious conclusion to draw from a new study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. The study, put together by researchers from Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania and Duke University's Fuqua School of Business, asked hundreds of people to pass judgment on light bulb options.
NEWS
By Jeffrey H. Joseph | November 5, 2013
A little-noticed yet significant report card was issued recently measuring the progress of the fledgling Consumer Financial Protection Bureau thus far. The report by a Bipartisan Policy Center task force comes after almost a year's worth of in-depth review and analysis and seems to support what critics of the CFPB have been saying all along: This unaccountable bureaucracy harms business and consumers alike. While reading the report's characterization of the bureau's standard operating procedures, one is more likely to envision the workings of a Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde versus those of a federal bureau charged with protecting millions of consumers.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Kusnet and David Kusnet,Special to the Sun | September 5, 1999
Ever since Adam and Eve were evicted from Eden, people have seen work as a grim necessity that gives structure, as well as sustenance, to our lives.But in today's turbo-charged economy, where new jobs last little longer than Hollywood marriages, does the lack of structure in our work threaten our identity and integrity?So asks the respected sociologist and workplace-watcher Richard Sennett in his "The Corrosion of Character: The Personal Consequences of Work in the New Capitalism" (W. W. Norton & Co., 176 pages, $23.95)
NEWS
May 3, 2013
To the age-old question of how many conservatives does it take to screw in a light bulb, we now have a definitive answer: Just one, but it will take him weeks to chase down a vintage incandescent bulb because he won't touch an energy-efficient one. At least that's the obvious conclusion to draw from a new study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. The study, put together by researchers from Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania and Duke University's Fuqua School of Business, asked hundreds of people to pass judgment on light bulb options.
BUSINESS
By JON VAN and JON VAN,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | October 25, 2005
For Comcast Corp. Chairman and Chief Executive Officer Brian L. Roberts, the key challenge in today's digital video world is how to become the Google of television. Roberts, who heads the nation's largest cable television provider, said broadband Internet makes the traditional cable TV business obsolete. As a result, he said, Comcast is stressing its on-demand video service, which enables customers to view movies and programs whenever they want. Consumers are beginning to get more choices in how they view video content, whether it is online, on mobile phones or new delivery schemes coming soon from the phone companies.
NEWS
By Sara Engram and Sara Engram,Special to the Sun | July 27, 2003
Across the state, yoga teachers are spinning out instructions and inspiration, while students of all ages bend, stretch and sometimes creak their way into unfamiliar positions. What keeps them coming back is a feeling of relaxed fitness and overall well-being that has fueled a yoga boom in Baltimore. But booms crest, and not everyone is convinced that yoga's latest surge in popularity can support all the studios and teachers that make up the Baltimore-area yoga scene. Some are even wondering how much yoga is too much.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Kusnet and David Kusnet,Special to the Sun | September 5, 1999
Ever since Adam and Eve were evicted from Eden, people have seen work as a grim necessity that gives structure, as well as sustenance, to our lives.But in today's turbo-charged economy, where new jobs last little longer than Hollywood marriages, does the lack of structure in our work threaten our identity and integrity?So asks the respected sociologist and workplace-watcher Richard Sennett in his "The Corrosion of Character: The Personal Consequences of Work in the New Capitalism" (W. W. Norton & Co., 176 pages, $23.95)
BUSINESS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,SUN STAFF | June 27, 1999
A greener energy future for America may be found atop BJ's Wholesale Club in Conshohocken, Pa.As shoppers cruise the discount store's aisles, 1,400 solar panels stretched out on the roof generate power cleanly and noiselessly for sale to customers in the Philadelphia area.The 43-kilowatt array, installed in April, produces enough energy to serve just a handful of homes. But to some, it represents the vanguard of a "green power" revolution, made possible by bringing competition to the traditionally dirty business of generating electricity.
BUSINESS
By Kevin L. McQuaid and Kevin L. McQuaid,SUN STAFF | January 20, 1998
A coalition of businesses and power generators in favor of busting Maryland's monopolistic electric supply system urged lawmakers in Annapolis yesterday to speed up planned deregulation by two years.Calling customer choice for electricity "the most pressing consumer issue in Maryland today," the Alliance for Customer Choice of Electrical Suppliers and Services (ACCESS) encouraged the state's General Assembly to pass laws that would promote full competition by July 2000."Our message is very simple: Deregulation and competition equal lower costs and create improved products and services," said Tom Saquella, president of the Maryland Retailers Association and a member of ACCESS.
BUSINESS
By JON VAN and JON VAN,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | October 25, 2005
For Comcast Corp. Chairman and Chief Executive Officer Brian L. Roberts, the key challenge in today's digital video world is how to become the Google of television. Roberts, who heads the nation's largest cable television provider, said broadband Internet makes the traditional cable TV business obsolete. As a result, he said, Comcast is stressing its on-demand video service, which enables customers to view movies and programs whenever they want. Consumers are beginning to get more choices in how they view video content, whether it is online, on mobile phones or new delivery schemes coming soon from the phone companies.
NEWS
By TRB | November 25, 1993
Washington.--Critics who complain that President Clinton's health-care plan has ''too much government'' are onto something, but they don't have it exactly right. The problem isn't too much government; it's too much politics. The Clinton plan will force society to make explicitly, through the political system, decisions on painful questions like limiting choice and rationing care that will be made in any event.Alternative plans will make these same decisions covertly, and possibly less sensibly.
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