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BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2011
Breaking up with a bank can be hard to do — and expensive if you don't do it right. Patsy Pahr of Towson says the mark left on her credit when she tried to close her Capital One credit card years ago came back recently to threaten her business license. And Norman Chase, a retired filbert farmer in Oregon, discovered that leaving $3.21 in an unused checking account led to a debt collector pursuing him for hundreds of dollars. Ending a relationship with a bank takes a little more work than starting one up. Both sides bear responsibility, but consumers should be extra vigilant.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Erik Maza and The Baltimore Sun | November 9, 2011
A Baltimore County man who sued Kooper's Tavern and Poncabird Pub over an obscure identity law has voluntarily dropped the lawsuits. A lawsuit against the Middle River bar Catches stands. In September, Ronald L. Bradley, of Baltimore County, sued The Fells Point bar and Poncabird Pub in East Baltimore, as well as Catches, for printing the expiration date of his credit in sales receipts. He claimed that was in violation of the Fair and Accurate Credit Transaction Act, a federal law that aims to prevent identity theft.
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BUSINESS
By Leslie Cauley and Leslie Cauley,Staff Writer | March 27, 1992
After seven years of steady declines in long-distance phone rates, it appears that the good fortune of consumers has finally run out: Phone rates are on the rise.Long-distance rates are creeping up for the first time since the 1984 breakup of AT&T according to a new survey by Consumer Action, a San Francisco-based consumer advocacy group. The survey covered basic rates, which do not include prices for discount calling plans.Although the increase was slight -- 1.86 percent over the past year -- the handwriting is on the wall, said Ken McEldowney, Consumer Action's executive director.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2011
Breaking up with a bank can be hard to do — and expensive if you don't do it right. Patsy Pahr of Towson says the mark left on her credit when she tried to close her Capital One credit card years ago came back recently to threaten her business license. And Norman Chase, a retired filbert farmer in Oregon, discovered that leaving $3.21 in an unused checking account led to a debt collector pursuing him for hundreds of dollars. Ending a relationship with a bank takes a little more work than starting one up. Both sides bear responsibility, but consumers should be extra vigilant.
BUSINESS
By Leslie Cauley and Leslie Cauley,Staff Writer | March 27, 1992
After seven years of steady declines in long-distance phone rates, it appears that the good fortune of consumers has finally run out: Phone rates are on the rise.Long-distance rates are creeping up for the first time since the 1984 breakup of AT&T, according to a new survey by Consumer Action, a San Francisco-based consumer advocacy group. The survey covered basic rates, which do not include prices for discount calling plans.Although the increase was slight -- 1.86 percent over the past year -- the handwriting is on the wall, said Ken McEldowney, Consumer Action's executive director.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Erik Maza and The Baltimore Sun | November 9, 2011
A Baltimore County man who sued Kooper's Tavern and Poncabird Pub over an obscure identity law has voluntarily dropped the lawsuits. A lawsuit against the Middle River bar Catches stands. In September, Ronald L. Bradley, of Baltimore County, sued The Fells Point bar and Poncabird Pub in East Baltimore, as well as Catches, for printing the expiration date of his credit in sales receipts. He claimed that was in violation of the Fair and Accurate Credit Transaction Act, a federal law that aims to prevent identity theft.
BUSINESS
By Susan E. Kinsman and Susan E. Kinsman,Hartford Courant zHC bvB | March 15, 1992
You've seen them.The television commercials selling long-distance telephone companies with claims of cheaper rates, less hassle or better reliability than their competitors.Actress Candice Bergen, for example, is selling U.S. Sprint Corp. -- the third-largest long-distance company -- on its rates, reliability and the fact that she is a customer.There are other gimmicks.Perhaps you found a $20 check in the mail. Free cash -- in exchange for switching your long-distance service to MCI Telecommunications Corp.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2011
Consumer advocates aren't getting their first choice to lead the new Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. Despite the setback, this is still a big week for consumer protection. Thursday is the one-year anniversary of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act , the date when some of the law's significant consumer-friendly provisions kick in. Creditors, for instance, will have to begin providing credit scores to certain credit-challenged customers — for free.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | October 25, 2010
The last of the credit card reforms kicked in just two months ago, but get ready soon for reform version 2.0. The Federal Reserve last week released proposed amendments to the Credit Card Accountability Responsibility and Disclosure Act to clarify language and close a loophole that could allow subprime lenders to charge high, upfront fees. "The CARD Act, ever since it was introduced, has needed clarity," says Curtis Arnold, founder of CardRatings.com. "There are a lot of gray areas.
NEWS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | July 19, 2010
The big win for consumers in the Wall Street reform that cleared Congress last week is the creation of a consumer protection agency designed to look out only for them. Federal regulators have had the dual duties for years of protecting consumers in money matters and ensuring the safety and soundness of the nation's financial institutions. But when it came down between the two, consumer protection often took a back seat. "They used to say you were more protected from sausages than mortgages at the federal level," says Terry Connelly, dean of Golden Gate University's business school.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2011
Consumer advocates aren't getting their first choice to lead the new Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. Despite the setback, this is still a big week for consumer protection. Thursday is the one-year anniversary of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act , the date when some of the law's significant consumer-friendly provisions kick in. Creditors, for instance, will have to begin providing credit scores to certain credit-challenged customers — for free.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | October 25, 2010
The last of the credit card reforms kicked in just two months ago, but get ready soon for reform version 2.0. The Federal Reserve last week released proposed amendments to the Credit Card Accountability Responsibility and Disclosure Act to clarify language and close a loophole that could allow subprime lenders to charge high, upfront fees. "The CARD Act, ever since it was introduced, has needed clarity," says Curtis Arnold, founder of CardRatings.com. "There are a lot of gray areas.
NEWS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | July 19, 2010
The big win for consumers in the Wall Street reform that cleared Congress last week is the creation of a consumer protection agency designed to look out only for them. Federal regulators have had the dual duties for years of protecting consumers in money matters and ensuring the safety and soundness of the nation's financial institutions. But when it came down between the two, consumer protection often took a back seat. "They used to say you were more protected from sausages than mortgages at the federal level," says Terry Connelly, dean of Golden Gate University's business school.
BUSINESS
By Leslie Cauley and Leslie Cauley,Staff Writer | March 27, 1992
After seven years of steady declines in long-distance phone rates, it appears that the good fortune of consumers has finally run out: Phone rates are on the rise.Long-distance rates are creeping up for the first time since the 1984 breakup of AT&T according to a new survey by Consumer Action, a San Francisco-based consumer advocacy group. The survey covered basic rates, which do not include prices for discount calling plans.Although the increase was slight -- 1.86 percent over the past year -- the handwriting is on the wall, said Ken McEldowney, Consumer Action's executive director.
BUSINESS
By Leslie Cauley and Leslie Cauley,Staff Writer | March 27, 1992
After seven years of steady declines in long-distance phone rates, it appears that the good fortune of consumers has finally run out: Phone rates are on the rise.Long-distance rates are creeping up for the first time since the 1984 breakup of AT&T, according to a new survey by Consumer Action, a San Francisco-based consumer advocacy group. The survey covered basic rates, which do not include prices for discount calling plans.Although the increase was slight -- 1.86 percent over the past year -- the handwriting is on the wall, said Ken McEldowney, Consumer Action's executive director.
BUSINESS
By Susan E. Kinsman and Susan E. Kinsman,Hartford Courant zHC bvB | March 15, 1992
You've seen them.The television commercials selling long-distance telephone companies with claims of cheaper rates, less hassle or better reliability than their competitors.Actress Candice Bergen, for example, is selling U.S. Sprint Corp. -- the third-largest long-distance company -- on its rates, reliability and the fact that she is a customer.There are other gimmicks.Perhaps you found a $20 check in the mail. Free cash -- in exchange for switching your long-distance service to MCI Telecommunications Corp.
BUSINESS
Yvonne Wenger | May 7, 2012
A survey of 549 community-based organizations suggests that housing discrimination is on the rise, particularly targeting disabled individuals, immigrants, minorities and families with children, according to the nonprofit Consumer Action . Locally, Baltimore Neighborhoods Inc. has said it found similar problems. The organizations, which has sent “testers” out in the region to inquire about available housing, filed suit last year and in 2010 over alleged discrimination.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | July 22, 2012
Cathy Pelekakis, who was without power for six days after the June derecho, quickly made a few calls to complain: to her state representative, the Baltimore County executive and the Maryland Public Service Commission. Next on her list: a letter to Comcast. "I don't appreciate the fact they are charging me for services that I never received through no fault of my own," says the 60-year-old Dundalk resident. "I'm going to ask them to compensate me for that time. … It's not much, $5 or $10. It's the principle behind it. " Thousands of Marylanders are likely feeling much the same.
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